Новини - литература и периодика - Архив 2017г.

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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 12 сеп 2017, 00:00

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1. Osprey's Big Reveal: General Aviation - 2017-09-11 15:50:00
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Time for another update in our Big Reveal! Today we're seeing what's next in our General Aviation series.
Concorde Pocket Manual
First flown in 1969, Concorde was the first supersonic aircraft to go into commercial service in 1976 and made her final flight in 2003. She was operated primarily by British Airways and Air France. British Airways’ Concordes made just under 50,000 flights and flew more than 2.5m passengers supersonically. A typical London to New York crossing would take a little less than three and a half hours compared to around eight hours for a ‘subsonic flight’. In November 1986 a Concorde flew around the world, covering 28,238 miles in 29 hours, 59 minutes.
Today, Concordes can be viewed at museums across the UK and in France, including at IWM Duxford, Brooklands and Fleet Air Arm Museum, as well as at Heathrow, Manchester and Paris-Orly airports. Through a series of key documents the book tells the story of how the aircraft was designed and developed as well as ground-breaking moments in her commercial history.
No Ordinary Pilot
After a lifetime in the RAF, Group Captain Bob Allen, finally allowed his children and grandchildren to see his official flying log. It contained the line: 'KILLED IN ACTION'. He refused to answer any further questions, leaving instead a memoir of his life during World War II.
Joining up aged 19, within six months he was in No.1 Squadron flying a Hurricane in a dog fight over the Channel. For almost two years he lived in West Africa, fighting the German’s Vichy French allies, as well as protecting the Southern Atlantic supply routes. Returning home at Christmas 1942, he retrained as a fighter-bomber pilot flying Typhoons and was one of the first over the Normandy beaches on D-Day.
On 25 July 1944 Bob was shot down, spending the rest of the war in a POW camp where he was held in solitary confinement, interrogated by the Gestapo and imprisoned in the infamous Stalag Luft 3 and suffered the winter march of 1945 before being liberated by the Russians.
Fleshing out Bob's careful third-person memoir with detailed research, his daughter Suzanne Campbell-Jones tells the gripping story of a more or less ordinary pilot, who came home with extraordinary memories which he kept to himself for more than 50 years.
Hurricane
This remarkable aircraft, designed and built to combat the emerging fighter strength of the Axis nations in the lead-up to World War II, made its name in the air battles over Britain and France in the first years of the war. Beloved by its pilots for its stable firing platform and reputation as a rugged survivor, the Hawker Hurricane quickly became the backbone of the RAF, scoring more kills than the more glamorous Spitfire in the Battle of Britain.
This compact volume draws on a wealth of research, artwork and contemporary photographs, as well as images of surviving Hurricanes in flight today, to present a complete guide to this classic fighter aircraft.
The Royal Air Force: A Centenary of Operations
The world’s first independent air force, the Royal Air Force celebrates its centenary in 2018. In the 100 years since the end of World War I, the service has been involved in almost continuous operations around the globe, giving the RAF the longest and most wide-ranging history of any air force in the world. But over the years this history has also become entangled with myths.
The Royal Air Force: A Centenary of Operations will set the record straight, dispelling these as it uncovers – in both words and photographs – the true exploits and accomplishments of RAF personnel over the last 100 years. From its formation as an independent service in the dying days of World War I, its desperate fight against the Axis air forces in World War II, to its commitments during both the Cold War and modern times, this is the complete story of how the RAF has defended Britain for a century.

Which of these General Aviation titles will be landing on your shelves in 2018?
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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 13 сеп 2017, 00:01

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1. The Other First World War - 2017-09-12 14:31:00

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Ahead of the publication of The Splintered Empires, author Prit Buttar sets the scene for the conclusion to his Eastern Front series, which follows Collision of Empires, Germany Ascendant, and Russia's Last Gasp.
This year has seen the centenary of the Third Battle of Ypres, or Passchendaele, as it is often known. Just as last year, when the terrible slaughter of the Somme was commemorated and remembered, there have been ceremonies to remember the hundreds of thousands of men who struggled through thick mud to try to break the German lines. As with so many battles in this war, the loss of life was utterly disproportionate to the ground gained.
Throughout Britain and France, there are memorials to the men who died in the fighting on the Western Front. Even small villages have sad epitaphs to the fathers, sons and brothers who never came home. Many of the fallen lie in the beautifully tended war cemeteries of northern France and Belgium; others have no known resting place, but their names are remembered with sorrow and pride. In Germany, too, there are memorials to the fallen, usually less prominent than those in the nations of the victors; lists of names of those who fought in the Kaiser's armies, fighting for a Germany that had effectively ceased to exist before the Treaty of Versailles formally brought the war to an end.
But whilst western narratives concentrate on the huge battles that raged in the trenches of the Western Front, a conflict of greater magnitude was being fought in the east, where the armies of Imperial Russia fought against Germany and Austria-Hungary in a series of campaigns and battles that perhaps had a far greater effect on the future shape of Europe and the rest of the world than the fighting in the west. These were the campaigns that led to the dissolution of the Austro-Hungarian Empire and the creation of a multitude of states across Eastern Europe; Poland was reborn, securing territory from all three combatant empires and Finland and the Baltic States secured their independence from Russia. Perhaps of greater importance was the fall of the tsars and the advent of Bolshevik Russia, an event that would shape international relations for the majority of the century that followed.
The publication of The Splintered Empires marks the end of a project that started several years ago. The motive was to give the Eastern Front in the First World War the attention that it deserves. When I embarked on this, the original intention was perhaps a two-volume work, but it rapidly became clear that such an account couldn't do justice to the great events in Eastern Europe, and the result was four volumes, covering the conflict from its beginnings to the end of the 'wars of the pygmies' that rolled on into the 1920s. An understanding of these wars is important - many of the seeds of the Second World War were sown during this time.
Perhaps the greatest tragedy of the fighting in the east is that millions of men in the armies of Imperial Russia and the Austro-Hungarian Empire died on battlefields from the Balkans to the Baltic, yet there are few, if any, memorials to them. The slaughter was every bit as great as that on the Western Front, and often just as futile. The two empires that sent their men into battle disappeared in the turmoil of 1917–1918; one was broken into fragments, and the other came under Bolshevik rule. Neither of the nations that were born out of the Austro-Hungarian Empire nor the new Soviet Union were minded to remember military service to previous regimes. My intention was to write an account of this war that would help explain how modern Europe was born, and how the imperfect peace at the end of the First World War almost inevitably led to another conflict a generation later, but I hope that my four books will also serve as a memorial to the forgotten men of Russia and the Austro-Hungarian Empire who marched, fought and died on the vast battlefields of the Eastern Front.
Prit's conclusion to his Eastern Front of World War I series will be published 21 September 2017. To preorder your copy of The Splintered Empires click here.
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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 14 сеп 2017, 00:00

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1. Triple Sprue Challenge - Phil's Apprentice - 2017-09-13 08:29:30
Having established the tone of the warband with the Wizard model, I next turned to the Apprentice – his right-hand-man, minion, and general dogsbody. The classic image is of an aged Wizard and a young Apprentice, but I wanted to subvert that trope a little by having an older Apprentice to accompany my rather haggard-looking Wizard.


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With that in mind, I started off by picking the head I wanted to use, and then building up the concept from there. The Barbarians sprue has, by my reckoning, the best selection of heads when it comes to ‘veterans’. Every one of them looks worn and experienced. The beards help, but even the beardless ‘youths’ seem to carry more than the weight of their years. I do have a penchant, it has to be said, for the combo of bald/shaven-headed and heavily bearded (with an eyepatch, for preference) – I like the vivid focal point it offers my relatively muted painting style. Happily, there are several options on the Barbarians sprue, and I picked one I haven’t used much before.
Head selected, I thought about the pose in which my Apprentice was to stand. Around this time, I decided that this was going to be a Witch warband – a school I’d not really done more than dabble in before. With the theme nailed down, it started to inform my kit-bashing choices, as ideas began to run through that filter as well as the ‘would it look cool?’ one.
I’d got the Wizard casting a spell, and decided to play up the ‘coven’ theme by having his Apprentice supporting his magic and casting a spell as well. I picked one of the Cultist bodies as it had a rather more static pose than some of the other options, and it tied into the kind of group ritual vibe I was after. The robes, while quite dramatic, are also less impressive than the cloak the Wizard has, so this helped to emphasise his subservient nature for me.
I nabbed another Cultist left arm, one that I’d trialled on the Wizard, and the sickle from the Cultist sprue that I had originally been considering for the Captain. I wanted raised arms to parallel the Wizard’s pose, and to suggest the power difference – what the Wizard could do with one hand, the Apprentice had to do with both! As-is, this gave an unfortunate ‘the kick is good’ pose, rather than a dramatic spellcasting one, so I carved away the back of the torso and affixed the arms to the new flat sections that created. A bit of filing and carving to blend the chest into the flat sides, and I was happy with the result.
The last addition was a pouch and dagger from the Cultist sprue to cover up a slight notch I’d taken out of the robes when carving back the shoulders, and to maintain my ‘wizards carry junk’ policy.
With the exception of the shoulder carving (which, to be fair, was pretty simple), this is another straightforward kit-bash. The heavy use of the Cultist sprue for this one made things easier, but it’s such a great kit for all kinds of wizardy things, thanks to the robes, the hoods, and the equipment.
The Triple Sprue Challenge is a competition running throughout August and September where we challenge you to create a Wizard, Apprentice, and Captain using one sprue from each of the Frostgrave humanoid boxes – Soldiers, Cultists, and Barbarians. For more details on how to enter and the prizes up for grabs, head over to the contest blog!
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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 15 сеп 2017, 00:00

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1. Osprey's Big Reveal: General Military (1) - 2017-09-14 10:59:36
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The end is in sight, as we bring you the penultimate post of our Big Reveal. With so many General Military titles being published in 2018, we thought we'd break it down for you, with part 2 coming your way tomorrow.
Atlas of the European Campaign: 1944–45
In June 1944 the Allies opened the long-awaited second front against Nazi Germany on the beaches of Normandy, and this was to be the start of a long struggle throughout Western Europe for the Allied forces in the face of stiff German resistance.
The European Theatre was where the bulk of the Allied forces were committed in the struggle against Nazi Germany. It saw some of the most famous battles and operations of the war – Normandy, Market Garden, the Battle of the Bulge – as the Allies sought to liberate Western Europe in the face of bitter and hard-fought German resistance.
On a Knife's Edge: The Ukraine, November 1942–March 1943
Late 1942 saw the strategic situation on the Eastern Front change completely. The encirclement of Paulus’ Sixth Army in Stalingrad trapped a significant portion of the Wehrmacht’s combat forces in the ruins of the devastated city, where they would ultimately die or be taken prisoner, but at the same time the entire German position was left in a catastrophic state. The year’s campaign had seen the Germans advance first east, but then increasingly to the south and southeast; the Soviet counter-offensive not only isolated Sixth Army, it also raised the possibility of the collapse of the entire front. The ultimate failure of the Red Army to achieve this – partly due to its own failings and partly due to the virtuosity of the Wehrmacht – ensured that there would be no swift end to the war. If the Red Army had succeeded in exploiting fully its initial success, a German recovery would have been impossible. Most accounts of the fighting in this phase of the war understandably concentrate on Stalingrad and the failed attempts to relieve the siege. But the story of how Erich von Manstein rebuilt the German front line is a fascinating history of an overlooked military campaign that irrevocably changed the course of the war. Manstein’s mobile campaign, in which all the strengths of the German forces, and all the weaknesses of their Soviet opponents, were revealed, makes for absorbing reading. Written by one of the world’s leading experts on the Eastern Front, On a Knife Edge, is a story of brilliant generalship, lost opportunities and survival in the harshest theatre of war.
The History of the Panzerjäger: Volume 1: Origins and Evolution 1939–42
The German Panzerjäger, or Panzerjägertruppe, was one of the most innovative fighting arms of World War II and its story has never properly been told. Many books have focused on an element of the story – the Hetzer, Jagdpanzer, Jagdpanther – but this is the first time that the whole story of the development and organization of Nazi Germany's anti-tank force will have been covered, from its earliest origins in World War I, through its development in the interwar period, and its baptism of fire in the early days of World War II. This is the first of two volumes that will trace the story through the glory years of Blitzkrieg and the improvements that were made when Soviet tanks were first encountered, leading to new weapons, tactics and organization.
1918: Winning the War, Losing the War
In 2018, the world will be commemorating the centenary of the end of the First World War. In many ways, 1918 was the most dramatic year of the conflict. After the defeat of Russia in 1917, the Germans were able to concentrate their forces on the Western Front for the first time in the war, and the German offensives launched from March 1918 onward brought the Western Allies close to defeat. Having stopped the German offensives, the Entente started its counter-attacks on all fronts with the assistance of fresh US troops, driving the Germans back and, by November 1918, the Central Powers had been defeated.
Day of the Ranger: The Battle of Mogadishu 25 Years On
Published to mark the battle’s 25th anniversary in October 2018, this new book is the definitive history of Operation Gothic Serpent. Focusing on the stories of the soldiers on the ground, and in the air, who fought during the infamous ‘Day of the Ranger’, as the Somalis referred to the battle, this book reveals the experiences and recollections of the Special Forces units who were involved including the Rangers, Delta operatives and Nightstalker crews.
Legion versus Phalanx
From the time of ancient Sumeria, the heavy infantry Phalanx dominated the battlefield. Armed with spears or pikes, standing shoulder-to-shoulder and with overlapping shields, they presented an impenetrable wall of metal to the enemy until the Roman legion eclipsed the phalanx as the masters of infantry battle.
Covering the period in which the legion and phalanx clashed (280-168 BC), this book looks at each formation in detail - delving into their tactics, arms and equipment, organization and deployment. It then examines six documented battles in which the legion fought the phalanx: Heraclea (280 BC), Asculum (279 BC), Beneventum (275 BC), Cynoscephalae (197 BC), Magnesia (190 BC), and Pydna (168 BC).
You can read about Myke Cole’s adventures in writing and researching Legion versus Phalanx here.
Otto Skorzeny: The Most Dangerous Man in Europe
SS-Obersturmbannführer Otto Skorzeny became a legend in his own time. ‘Hitler’s favourite commando’ acquired a reputation as a man of daring, renowned for his audacious 1943 mission to extricate Mussolini from a mountain-top prison. Skorzeny’s influence on special operations doctrine was far-reaching and long-lasting – in 2011, when US Navy SEALs infiltrated Pakistan to eliminate Osama Bin Laden, the operational planning was influenced by Skorzeny’s legacy. Yet he was also a fame-hungry egoist who stole other men’s credit (including for the seminal rescue of Mussolini); brave and resourceful but also an unrepentant Nazi and a self-aggrandising hogger of the limelight.
From his background as a student radical in Vienna, to his bloody service with the Waffen-SS on the Eastern Front, his surprise rebirth as a commando, and his intriguing post-war career and mysterious fortune, this book tells Otto Skorzeny’s story in full – warts and all – for the first time.
Rome at War
The Roman Empire was the greatest the world has ever seen, and its legendary military might was the foundation of this success.
This compact volume tells the fascinating story of the major conflicts that shaped the empire, from Julius Caesar's bloody Gallic Wars and the Civil War against Pompey that left the victorious Caesar Dictator of Rome, through the wars of expansion to its decline and fragmentation.
Run to the Sound of the Guns: The True Story of an American Ranger at War in Afghanistan and Iraq
Nicholas Moore served as part of an elite special operations unit at the fighting edge of the global war on terrorism. He served over a decade with the US Army’s 75th Ranger Regiment on the battlefields of Afghanistan and Iraq.
In Iraq, Nicholas participated in the rescue of Private Jessica Lynch, hunted Iraq’s Most Wanted and experienced brutal street combat, including 160 night-time missions over one 90-day deployment in the insurgent stronghold of Mosul. While serving in Afghanistan, he was also part of the search and rescue operation for Navy SEAL Marcus Luttrell (author of Lone Survivor), and was on the ground again when a Chinook helicopter was shot down resulting in the death of 38 men and one military working dog. It was the single greatest loss of special operations personnel to date.

That's all for now, but remember to keep your eyes peeled tomorrow as we reveal the rest of our General Military titles. In the meantime, let us know your thoughts on these titles in the comment section below!
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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 16 сеп 2017, 00:00

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1. Osprey's Big Reveal: General Military (2) - 2017-09-15 13:54:00
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We've reached the end of our Big Reveal for another year, and to round off our preview of what's to come in 2018, we have the final part of our General Military reveal.
Snapdragon: The World War II exploits of Darby's Ranger and Combat Photographer Phil Stern
Prior to Stern’s death on December 13, 2014, his original, unfinished, tattered manuscript was discovered, stashed away in an old folio box in his cluttered Hollywood bungalow. Although best remembered for his iconic images of James Dean, Marilyn Monroe and JFK’s inauguration, his remarkable service during World War II as a combat photographer has remained unknown. Until now.
Stern’s catchy 1940s lingo, honest and intimate observations, and humour, transport the reader 70 years back in time to experience the key battles of the Mediterranean Theatre. With his lens and pen, Stern introduces readers to the hardscrabble Rangers, the desert oases of Morocco and Algeria, the muddied beaches of Mussolini’s Italy. Snapdragon is an artefact of that time, told not by a man reminiscing in his twilight years, but by a young soldier fresh from the battlefields.
The Royal Air Force: A Centenary of Operations
The world’s first independent air force, the Royal Air Force celebrates its centenary in 2018. In the 100 years since the end of World War I, the service has been involved in almost continuous operations around the globe, giving the RAF the longest and most wide-ranging history of any air force in the world. But over the years this history has also become entangled with myths.
The Royal Air Force: A Centenary of Operations will set the record straight, dispelling these as it uncovers – in both words and photographs – the true exploits and accomplishments of RAF personnel over the last 100 years. From its formation as an independent service in the dying days of World War I, its desperate fight against the Axis air forces in World War II, to its commitments during both the Cold War and modern times, this is the complete story of how the RAF has defended Britain for a century.
The Third Reich is Listening: Inside German Codebreaking 1939-45
The German navy’s signals intelligence service, the Beobachtungsdienst, or B-Dienst, began trying to crack the codes of the Royal Navy long before the war. Leading the attack was a German cryptanalyst called Wilhelm Tranow, who helped read the signals and pinpoint the exact locations of many British warships and convoys, increasing Germany’s strategic advantage in the bloody Battle of the Atlantic.
The Third Reich is Listening is the comprehensive account of the successes, the failures and the science of Germany’s codebreaking and signals intelligence operations from 1935 to 1945. This fast-moving blend of modern history and popular science is told through colourful personal accounts of the Germans at the heart of the story, and through the bigger strategic picture. And it investigates how and why a regime as technologically advanced as the Third Reich both succeeded, and failed, in its battle to break their enemy’s codes, and to use the resultant intelligence effectively.
Tidal Wave: From Leyte Gulf to Tokyo Bay
The United States Navy won such overwhelming victories in 1944 that, had the navy faced a different enemy, the war would have been over at the conclusion of the battle of Leyte Gulf.
However, in the moment of victory on 25 October 1944, the US Navy found itself confronting an enemy that had been inconceivable until it appeared. The kamikaze, 'divine wind' in Japanese, was something Americans were totally unprepared for; a violation of every belief held in the West. The attacks were terrifying: regardless of the damage inflicted on an attacking airplane, there was no certainty of safety aboard the ship until that airplane was completely destroyed.
Based on first-person accounts, Tidal Wave is the story of the naval campaigns in the Pacific from the victory at Leyte Gulf to the end of the war, in which the US Navy would fight harder for survival than ever before.
To the Bitter End: The Final Campaigns of 1918
1918 is the defining year of World War I. The initial German offensives saw the Allies stretched to breaking point, while the final Allied advances broke the strength of the German Army and led to the Armistice of November 1918.
To the Bitter End tells the whole story, examining the German revision of operational methods and the Kaiserschlacht offensives of Spring 1918, Allied operational and command reform and the major battles of Amiens, the Scarpe, and the decisive Meuse-Argonne campaign of the Autumn. Dr David Murphy details the critical events of the decisive year of World War I , including the progress of the war beyond the Western Front, and examines its immediate strategic legacy and how, post-1918, the former Allies found themselves involved in further conflict in Russia, Afghanistan, Ireland and Iraq.
Valley of the Shadow: The Siege of Dien Bien Phu
Following the end of World War II, France attempted to reassert control over its colonies in Indo-China. In Vietnam, this was resisted by the Viet Minh, leading to the First Indo-China War. By 1954, the French army was on the defensive and determined to force the Viet Minh into a decisive set-piece battle at Dien Bien Phu.
Over the past five decades, Western authors have generally followed a standard narrative of the siege of Dien Bien Phu, depicting the Viet Minh besiegers as a faceless horde which overwhelmed the intrepid garrison by sheer weight of numbers, superior firepower, and logistics. However, a wealth of new Vietnamese-language sources tell a very different story, revealing for the first time the true Viet Minh order of battle and the details of the severe logistical constraints within which the besiegers had to operate.
Using these sources, complemented by interviews with French veterans and research in the French Army and French Foreign Legion archives, this is a new telling of the climactic battle in the Indo-China War, the conflict that set the stage for the Vietnam War a decade later.
The Cutty Sark Pocket Manual
Constructed on the Clyde in 1869 for the Jock Willis Shipping Line, Cutty Sark was one of the last tea clippers to be built and one of the fastest.
Cutty Sark spent just a few years on the tea routes before the opening of the Suez Canal and the increasing use of steamships made clippers unprofitable on shorter routes. She was turned to the trade in wool from Australia, where for ten years she held the record time for a journey to Britain.
As steamships also came to dominate the longer sailing route to Australia, the ship was sold to the Portuguese company Ferreira and Co. in 1895, and renamed Ferreira. She continued as a cargo ship until she was sold as a training and cadet ship, a role in which she continued until 1954 when she was transferred to permanent dry dock at Greenwich, London, for public display.
This pocket manual collates original documents to tell the fascinating story of how the legendary Cutty Sark was commissioned, her design and building, life on board and her notable journeys.
Forts
Ever since humans began to live together in settlements they have felt the need to organise some kind of defence against potentially hostile neighbours. Many of the earliest city states were built as walled towns and weapon systems and siege strategies evolved to counter these defensive designs. During the medieval era, stone castles were built both as symbols of the defenders’ strength and as actual protection against potential attack.
The advent of cannon prompted fortifications to become lower, denser and more complex from the sixteenth century onwards. The design of the forts of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries could appear like snowflakes in their complexity and beautiful geometry. Forts were often ephemeral too, first appearing in Tudor times, with earthworks and bastions arranged in star or rose patterns, by the late nineteenth century they were all but redundant.
The development of such fortifications is illustrated using photographs, plans and beautiful drawings and maps to explain the story of these structures. The text and images will explore why they were built, their various functions and their immense historical legacy in laying the foundations of empire. Without forts, the history of America could have taken a very different course, pirates could have sailed the seas unchecked and Britain itself could have been successfully invaded.
HMS Belfast Pocket Manual
A familiar sight on the Thames at London Bridge, HMS Belfast is a Royal Navy light cruiser, launched in March 1938. Belfast was part of the British naval blockade against Germany and from November 1942 escorted Arctic convoys to the Soviet Union and assisted in the destruction of the German warship Scharnhorst. In June 1944 Belfast supported the Normandy landings and in 1945 was redeployed to the British Pacific Fleet. After the war she saw action in the Korean War and a number of other overseas actions. She has been part of the Imperial War Museum since 1978, with 250,000 visitors annually.
This book comprises a series of documents that give information on the building of the ship, her wartime service history and life on board.
The German Soldier's Pocket Manual
This is the first Pocket Manual to be dedicated to the German Army in World War I, with chapters comprising of complete documents or extracts drawn from two major sources: the German Army of 1914–1918 itself, or the intelligence sections of other armies.
It describes the new tactics and units developed by the German army during the war, including the myths surrounding Stormtrooper units. These new methods used were a result of interaction between the opposing forces and incremental in their appearance. Nevertheless the new ideas were hugely influential and important not only to the German army but to others as well, including British and American forces.
This fascinating pocket manual gives a German perspective to World War I.
The Spy Toolkit
Spies claim that theirs is the second oldest profession. Secret agents across time have had the same key tasks: looking and listening, getting the information they need and smuggling it back home. Over the course of human history, some amazingly complex and imaginative tools have been created to help those working under the cloak of supreme secrecy.
During World War II, British undercover agents were the heroes behind the scenes, playing a dangerous and sometimes deadly game – risking all to gather intelligence about their enemies. What did these agents have in their toolkits? What ingenious spy gadgets did they have up their sleeves? What devious tricks did they deploy to avoid detection? From the ingenious to the amusing, this highly visual book delves into espionage files that were long held top secret, revealing spycraft in action.
Warship 2018
Warship 2018 is devoted to the design, development and service history of the world's combat ships. Featuring a broad range of articles from a select panel of distinguished international contributors, this latest volume combines original research, new book reviews, warship notes, an image gallery and much more to maintain the impressive standards of scholarship and research from the field of warship history.
This 40th edition features the usual range of diverse articles spanning the subject by an international array of expert authors.

Well, that's your lot for 2017's Big Reveal, thanks for joining in the fun, and don't forget to let us know which of these 2018 releases you're adding to your wish-lists!
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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 19 сеп 2017, 00:00

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1. Scrappers: Exploring the Wasteland with author Bob Faust - 2017-09-18 07:20:38
Bob Faust, author of Scrappers: Post-Apocalyptic Skirmish Wargames and creator of the Brink of Battle ruleset, took time out of his busy schedule to answer some questions about his most recent wargame and give some tips to new players and seasoned veterans alike!
So, set the scene for us. What has happened to Earth?
Earth 200 years from now is a technological paradise by today’s standards. The world is, big surprise, vastly over populated and 98% of the populace live in giant archologies that dot the planet. We’ve repaired the environment, reduced geo-political tensions, and advanced in all major areas of technology. The Earth is effectively run by five Artificial Intelligences that handle all aspects of daily operation and control. The next phase is to travel to the stars and terraform other worlds, thereby expanding the Human Sphere and easing our population problems.
What no one saw coming was the impossible: one of the ‘male’ AI’s fell in love with one of the ‘females’ and didn’t know the other ‘female’ was in love with ‘him’. That’s when things broke loose. The jealous AI, GAIA, sent a terrorist cell to sabotage the ‘male’ ARES AI’s terraforming protocols jointly known as the Triple Helix Effect. This took a program used to rewrite human-friendly third DNA strands over an extant bio-sphere’s genetic makeup to increase the viability of cohabitation. It also used advance geo-quantum thing-a-ma-jiggery to transform the atmosphere and geo-physics to be compatible to human needs. But when you alter the program, then unleash it on your own planet, bad things happen. Roll with it, it’s Sci-Fi…
Of course, the people in charge unplugged ARES and then the orbital defense array who loved him, ATHENA, lost her nut and blew up the rest of the world. And 150 years later, we have the world of Scrappers!
What drew you towards the post-apocalyptic setting for this game?

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Growing up in the USA in the late 70’s and early 80’s I was drowning in the Hey Day of Post-Apocalyptic TV shows and movies. From my obsession with Thundarr the Barbarian to Mad Max: The Road Warrior, ARK II, Damnation Alley, The Omega Man, A Boy and His Dog, Escape from New York, and all of the Planet of the Apes movies and I was hooked. But what REALLY put the nail in my coffin as a PA nutter was a little role-playing game called Gamma World!
What James M. Ward did with that original edition blew my young mind! In one rulebook he took me to another world entirely, and then I went from there. Legion of Gold and Famine in Fargo were great modules, and even though I’m not big on ‘whimsy’ murderous mutant chicken men were far more terrifying than they ever could be ‘whimsical’. I own all editions except the Alternity stuff, and find something great in every version.
One thing that Phil Smith, our editor, and I strongly agreed upon in the early stages of Scrappers planning was that we wouldn’t have any ‘wacky or whimsical’ elements. Edgy, cool, and dangerous were the prevailing ethos behind the setting. We wanted the randomness and variety that can be found in the Sci-Fantasy/Post-Apocalypse sub-genre, without silliness. Of course, every member of my creative team LOVES to threaten to buy anthropomorphic rabbits and badgers, and mice ‘people’ to play against me. They have yet to make good on that threat, cuz that would put them within reach of my Anti-Whimsy field!
OK, lets focus on the game itself. What do players need to know about creating their Scrappers crew?
100% customizable. You determine the Lifeform Type for each model, whether True Human, Mutant, or Synthetic. You pick the type of Faction you’ll play, and assign each model on your Crew with its Ratings, Traits, and Gear. If you wanted a game that lets you really get stuck in to the ‘story’ of your band of warriors, this is your book.
And true to the Osprey Games spirit, you can use ANY models from your collections to play. I joked in the beginning that we’ve done more to resurrect Squats than any other system! Seriously though, as long as the miniature looks like the guy you built on paper, you are good to go.
You mention choosing Factions, could you tell us a bit more about them?
You bet. From the beginning Drew & I kicked around different Faction concepts. What we settled on has a more useful purpose than at first glance. Sure we wanted you to play our setting, but we also wanted to keep the Brink of Battle/Epic Heroes concept of ‘you own it, you play it your way’ that we’ve established with our customers. So to that end, we have 7 different Factions. Six of them are paired with a Rival Faction that represents different conceptual conflicts. The last one is Rival to all others of its type.

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The Architechs are the keepers of the Lost Tech that survived under their careful stewardship. They are trying to re-build the world while creating a future for all sapient life, including mutant and synthetic types. Their Rivals are the Sons of Entropy. Imagine Hassan-i-Sabbah’s Society of Assassins as an Outlaw Motorcycle Club with some mutants thrown in and you get the idea. They want to destroy social structure and rule as the fittest gang on the planet.
Next we have the Ecotopians who followed GAIA’s survival and transformation through the Triple Helix Event and dark days thereafter. While they have the ability to craft firearms and other gear from the Natural world, they despise and destroy all Artifacts from the Ancients when they find them. For this worship GAIA blesses them with vigor and life. Their Rivals are the Palladium ATHENA. When the world governments got attack from orbit by ATHENA at the death of ARES, they fired back with all they had left. When she later came back online, she was lost in the delusion that she is the living manifestation of the Warrior Goddess and protector of Earth, or the Palladium ATHENA. She takes over any robots she can contact, and then has them turn True Humans and Mutants into cyber-thralls to swell her ranks.
The final pairing is really just two sides of the same bigoted coin: The Purge wants a world free of Mutants and the Gamma Lords want a world free of True Humans. Both can only have Crew members of their given Lifeform Type and are utterly ruthless in obtaining their ‘perfect’ worlds.
Finally, we have those Freelancer Crews who are either off-shoots of other Factions that do things their own way, or professionals who don’t care who they scrap for, and will carry out all manner of tasks if the pay is good. This Crew’s Rivals are all other Freelancer Crews! Since they are Gawdamned Professionals, they get access to some better starting Gear and can have a third Veteran on their Crew if they like.
OK, our crew is put together and we are on the battlefield. How do the turns progress?
Scrappers is built on the Brink of Battle core mechanic. Players roll to determine who has the Edge (initiative with bonuses) and the Break (interrupt) for that Turn. Play passes back and forth as each player activates one model at a time. So it’s not the I GO my entire turn while you stand and get killed, then U GO your entire turn with your leftovers…..
It’s designed to account for simultaneous actions and unexpected twists in the ebb and flow of combat. Read up on Brink of Battle and Scrappers reviews from Anatoli’s Game Room to get a better sense of what makes this system different and fun.
Scrappers also has a campaign mode, can you give us a bit more information on that?
Actually, it’s a Campaign game first and foremost! While you can play one off battles, its full value and enjoyment is best had with the Campaign. Build your Crews, risk their necks, and see them get better, collect Artifacts, lose limbs, and get radiation poisoning all in a days work!
Any top tips for people playing Scrappers that only its creator could know?
Yes there are a few. First, read the whole rulebook. Not a word is wasted. Second, mechanically it’s probably very different from what most folks have played. It’s not a ‘cut and paste’ from other systems, so it should be read through like any rulebook, without the reader making any assumptions.
So, even though I’m a rank amateur for making ‘how to play’ videos, until someone makes prettier ones, players should go to our Youtube Channel to see how the game plays and then read the book.
Also, be sure to download all of our Scrappers Reference/Playsheets, Crew Manifests, and other game aids from the Downloads tab on our website or from the Osprey Games resources page for Scrappers.
Also, we have a thriving Facebook group of fellow enthusiasts who will gladly help you get started and answer any questions you may have. You can join it here.
Last tip, make it yours and have a blast!
Scrappers is a skirmish miniatures game set in the wastelands, where players assemble Scrappers Crews and send them out to scavenge scraps of Ancient technology and battle rival factions. Pick up your copy today!
Artwork by David Auden Nash.
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1. NVG September Sale - 2017-09-19 16:35:00
This September we have a site-wide sale including Air Vanguard (AVG), New Vanguard (NVG) and Weapon (WPN) titles.
With 20% off such a huge amount of titles, we decided to take a trip down memory lane to reminisce and help you decide which titles deserve your attention this month.
In today’s post, we’re taking a look at our New Vanguard titles.
The Beginning
NVG began in the early nineties, with NVG 1: Kingtiger Heavy Tank 1942–45 publishing in 1993. Since then, hundreds of New Vanguards have joined the ranks, each taking a particular machine of warfare, and assessing its design, development and operation. It’s this approach that has allowed NVG to become one of our most popular series.
NVG reaches its 250th title this month when Maginot Line Gun Turrets goes on sale, making it Osprey’s third longest running series. Naturally we have long since covered many of the best-known tanks, AFVs, warships, and military animals but there are still plenty to go.

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Taken from NVG 150: War Elephants
Next year we publish the first NVG on oceangoing ironclads – the American Civil War apart, it’s pretty much our first look at the revolutionary near-century that separates the Napoleonic sailing warship from the launch of Dreadnought. There’s still a few major World War II AFVs that we’ve yet to cover and quite a few more modern ones. We can also occasionally explore how armour has been used in lesser-known conflicts, as we did with South African Armour of the Border War. And New Vanguard’s brief to explore ‘the machinery of war’ of all kinds means that we can also sometimes cover other things mechanical and military that we think you might be interested in, from technicals to railway guns.

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Taken from NVG 242: Soviet Cold War Guided Missile Cruisers. This plate shows completed Slava Class cruiser.
Have You Seen?
In last month’s Big Reveal blog series, we announced what we’re publishing throughout 2018. Click here to read up on the 12 brand new titles joining New Vanguard.
Bestsellers
For all of you struggling to make your mind up on which AVG/NVG title is best for you, we’ve put together a list of some of our bestselling titles in the series.





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If you’re a fan of our NVG series, we’d love to hear what you think? What was your first book in the series? Do you have a favourite? Share your thoughts in the comments!
2. Vietnam War Recommended Reading - 2017-09-18 19:10:00
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On Sunday, September 17, The Vietnam War: A Film by Ken Burns and Lynn Novick premiered. This is a 10-part, 18-hour documentary, and is one that we at Osprey have been looking forward to for months. The official description on the website reads:

The Vietnam War, tells the epic story of one of the most consequential, divisive, and controversial events in American history as it has never before been told on film. Visceral and immersive, the series explores the human dimensions of the war through revelatory testimony of nearly 80 witnesses from all sides—Americans who fought in the war and others who opposed it, as well as combatants and civilians from North and South Vietnam. Ten years in the making, the series includes rarely seen and digitally re-mastered archival footage from sources around the globe, photographs taken by some of the most celebrated photojournalists of the 20th Century, historic television broadcasts, evocative home movies, and secret audio recordings from inside the Kennedy, Johnson, and Nixon administrations. The Vietnam War features more than 100 iconic musical recordings from greatest artists of the era and haunting original music from Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross as well as the Silk Road Ensemble featuring Yo-Yo Ma.

You can discover even more information about this film on the official site, in addition to some great clips to take a look at this stunning footage. Speaking of footage, here's the official trailer for the film, and it is certainly worth a watch:


To help share our excitement, we've put together a list of some of our favorite Vietnam War titles that we publish. Take a look to see some great reading to supplement watching this fantastic film. We hope you enjoy them as much as we do, and be sure to tell us your thoughts on the Ken Burns film after watching!
Vietnam: A View from the Front Lines

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The Vietnam War ripped America apart and charted the nation's tumultuous future. In their tens of thousands, young men went off to fight in what was an initially popular war only to face defeat and acrimony as national resolve wavered - and returned home to a nation that reviled them and tried to forget about them. Written by Andrew Wiest, the best-selling author of The Boys of '67: Charlie Company's War in Vietnam this book traces the American experience of Vietnam from the war's popular inception to its morale-crushing and bitter conclusion.

Based on rich collection housed at the Center of Military History and at the Vietnam Archive at Texas Tech, Vietnam allows the reader a grunt's-eye view of the conflict - from the steaming rice paddies and swamps of the Mekong Delta, to the triple-canopy rainforest of the Central Highlands, and to the forlorn Marine bases that dotted the DMZ. The stories contained within these pages detail everything from heroism and battle to helicopters hitting the landing zones and death and injury.

In their own words, this is a true and grippingly accurate portrait of the American war in Vietnam through the eyes of the men and women who fought in that far away land, and those they left behind.

Company of Heroes

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There are many broad studies of the Vietnam War, but this work offers an insight into the harrowing experiences of just a small number of men from a single unit, deep in the jungles of Vietnam and Cambodia.
Its focus is the remarkable account of a Medal of Honor recipient Leslie Sabo Jr., whose brave actions were forgotten for over three decades. Sabo and other replacement soldiers in Bravo Company, 3rd Battalion, 506th Infantry (Currahees), 101st Airborne Division, were involved in intense, bloody engagements such as the battle for Hill 474 and the Mother's Day Ambush.
Beginning with their deployment at the height of the blistering Tet Offensive, and using military records and interviews with surviving soldiers, Eric Poole recreates the terror of combat amidst the jungles and rice paddies of Vietnam. Company of Heroes, now published in paperback, tells the remarkable story of how Sabo earned his medal, as Bravo Company forged bonds of brotherhood in their daily battle for survival.
The Boys of '67

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When the 160 men of Charlie Company (4th Battalion/47th Infantry/9th ID) were drafted by the US Army in May 1966, they were part of the wave of conscription that would swell the American military to 80,000 combat troops in theater by the height of the war in 1968. In the spring of 1966, the war was still popular and the draftees of Charlie Company saw their service as a rite of passage. But by December 1967, when the company rotated home, only 30 men were not casualties-and they were among the first vets of the war to be spit on and harassed by war protestors as they arrived back the U.S.
In his new book, The Boys of '67, Andy Wiest, the award-winning author of Vietnam's Forgotten Army and The Vietnam War 1956-1975, examines the experiences of a company from the only division in the Vietnam era to train and deploy together in similar fashion to WWII's famous 101st Airborne Division.
Wiest interviewed more than 50 officers and enlisted men who served with Charlie Company, including the surviving platoon leaders and both of the company's commanders. (One of the platoon leaders, Lt Jack Benedick, lost both of his legs, but went on to become a champion skier.) In addition, he interviewed 15 family members of Charlie Company veterans, including wives, children, parents, and siblings. Wiest also had access to personal papers, collections of letters, a diary, an abundance of newspaper clippings, training notebooks, field manuals, condolence letters, and photographs from before, during, and after the conflict.
As Wiest shows, the fighting that Charlie Company saw in 1967 was nearly as bloody as many of the better publicized battles, including the infamous 'Ia Drang' and 'Hamburger Hill.' As a result, many of the surviving members of Charlie Company came home with what the military now recognizes as Post Traumatic Stress Disorder-a diagnosis that was not recognized until the late 1970s and was not widely treated until the 1980s. Only recently, after more than 40 years, have many members of Charlie Company achieved any real and sustained relief from their suffering.
The US Army in the Vietnam War 1965-73

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This book provides detailed information about how US Army units were organised and operated in America's longest war. Vietnam Special Forces veteran Gordon L Rottman examines the different types of infantry battalions and the units that supported them, their training and organisation down to platoon level. Aspects of the US Army's conventional and unconventional warfare doctrine are also addressed, along with a discussion of how replacements were trained and integrated into units. Among other areas of the US Army's involvement covered are individual and crew-served weapons, artillery, armoured fighting vehicles, transport, logistics, the complex chain of command, and combat operations.



US Helicopter Pilot in Vietnam

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One of the most enduring and vivid images of Vietnam is the helicopter. There is little doubt that the helicopter revolutionized warfare and how the war in Vietnam (1955-1975) was fought. Helicopters lifted troops, supplies, material, equipment, and vehicles. They conducted visual reconnaissance, command and control, medical evacuation, artillery spotting, fire support, and countless administrative tasks. They were aerial weapons platforms and aerial trucks. The 40,000 pilots were the men behind this revolution.
Many helicopter pilots were thrill seekers to some degree. They liked fast cars and a fast life. To "party hardy" was a common term used to describe their lifestyle. They loved to fly and the war gave them the opportunity to do that. They were little concerned with the politics of the war, the conflicts back at home, and could care less about the drug culture, sexual revolution, the environment, and other social issues that defined their generation. A common aviator's phrase was, "Who needs drugs, I'm already high."
Helicopter pilots experienced a broad range of combat, from air-lift, med-evac and fire-support to landing in 'Hot LZs', in which choppers would find themselves caught in deadly high-volume crossfires. Crew protection, other than armored seats for the pilots, was minimal. There was little armor to protect vital engines, transmissions, and fuel tanks. Crashes were survivable, but aircrews suffered relatively high casualties. Enemy action was not the only cause for concern. Of the 4,642 US helicopters lost in Vietnam, over half were due to non-hostile causes-accidents, mechanical failure, weather, and other non-combat causes. Aviators had to deal with long flying hours in a less than pleasant climate, heat, humidity, dust, rapidly changing weather conditions, spare parts shortages, and spotty maintenance. All of these accumulated to make the lives of natural risk-takers more dangerous. This book will reveal their experiences from their first deployment to the deadly thrill of combat in a war zone. Accompanied by poignant photographs and written by a Vietnam veteran, this is a crucial addition to our coverage of the conflict that defined the post-war generation in America.
Viet Cong Fighter

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Osprey's study of the Viet Cong fighters of the Vietnam War (1955-1975). An enemy in the shadows, the Viet Cong was the military arm of the National Liberation Front, the Communist Party of the Republic of Vietnam. Often generally thought of as local guerrillas, they were also an important part of the North Vietnamese Army regular cadres.
Packed with emotive and rare photographs, this book not only analyzes the skills and tactics of these fascinating fighters, but also takes a look at their social origins to interpret how this affected their behavior as warriors.
Gordon L Rottman discusses the Viet Cong's recruitment and initial training, their unique motivation, their extensive political and psychological indoctrination, and their distinct equipment and weaponry, to provide a compelling and balanced account of these legendary guerrilla fighters.
US Marine vs NVA Soldier

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In 1967-68, the United States Marine Corps (USMC) was on the front line of the defense of South Vietnam's Quang Tri province, which was at the very heart of the Vietnam conflict. Facing them were the soldiers of the North Vietnamese Army (NVA), men whose organization and equipment made them a very different opponent from the famous, irregular Viet Cong forces. From the "Hill Battles" in April 1967 to the struggle for the city of Hu? (January-March 1968) this bloody campaign forced the two sides into a grueling trial of strength. The USMC held a general technological and logistical advantage--including close air support and airborne transport, technology, and supplies - but could not always utilize these resources effectively in mountainous, jungle, or urban environments better known by their Vietnamese opponents.
In this arresting account of small-unit combat, David R. Higgins steps into the tropical terrain of Vietnam to assess the performance and experience of six USMC and NVA units in three savage battles that stretched both sides to the limit.
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1. Triple Sprue Challenge - Filip's Apprentice - 2017-09-20 07:53:15
Having completed my wizard, the clear next step in the challenge was to create his apprentice. Once again, I wanted a character warped by undeath, but this time someone more twisted and malevolent.

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This intention, combined with the fact that I only had two skull heads to work with for my three characters, led me to go for the executioner-style hood. The facelessness of it invokes a strong sinister vibe, and something about it feels angry. To hopefully add to that sense of sinister, I put him atop a cultist body standing straight up, for a much more static pose than the wizard.
I still wanted to convey very clearly that the apprentice is partially undead, so once again went for a skeletal arm. There were a bunch of conflicting ideas for the arms in general for this guy, but like with the wizard, I find that simplicity tends to come across the strongest. I didn’t want it reaching forward, as that would be too much like the wizard himself. Instead, having the arm and down to side, whilst still a bit flexed, implied stillness whilst still being alert.
The final feature, then, was the right arm. I’m not entirely pleased with the outcome here, as I wanted a sense of his weapon resting on his shoulder. Unfortunately, I couldn’t find the appropriate part, nor am I overly deft at modelling, so I don’t know how well this comes across. As he is an apprentice, I removed the axe head and instead attached a chain to the end, with the intention of turning it into some type of censer. Eventually I decided on one of the heads from the barbarian sprue, as some grim flail.
In the end, a model I’m not as excited by as the wizard, but which achieves its main goal – being unlikable.
The Triple Sprue Challenge is a competition running throughout August and September where we challenge you to create a Wizard, Apprentice, and Captain using one sprue from each of the Frostgrave humanoid boxes – Soldiers, Cultists, and Barbarians. For more details on how to enter and the prizes up for grabs, head over to the contest blog!
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1. WPN September Sale - 2017-09-21 13:16:00
This September we have a site-wide sale including Air Vanguard (AVG), New Vanguard (NVG) and Weapon (WPN) titles. With 20% off such a huge amount of titles, we thought it would be fun to look into their history, delve into our back-catalogue and discuss what’s to come.
In today’s blog post, we’re rifling through the history of our Weapon series.
The Beginning
Many of you will be familiar with the beginning of our Weapon series and will recall its launch in 2010 with its first title, The Thompson Submachine Gun: From Prohibition Chicago to World War II. Since then WPN has gone from strength to strength, with Martin Pegler writing a further six titles, more recently with Sharpshooting Rifles of the American Civil War, which published last month.

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From 'The Thompson Submachine Gun', a squad of US Marines fight from a foxhole during the Pacific campaign of World War II.
WPN from the outset has allowed us to roam through history in a unique way, looking at the use, development and impact of weapons, from the composite bow to assault rifles, the gladius to revolvers, and everything in between.
Recent Highlights
WPN reached the milestone of its 50th title in October 2016 when The Mosin-Nagant Rifle joined the WPN ranks.
The series has also allowed our authors to have a bit of fun. If you haven’t read MC Bishop’s blog post on putting theory into practice with the pilum and having a go at ‘myth-busting’, then please do have a read here.

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Peter Dennis's artwork featured in 'The Pilum', depicting Caesar’s confrontation with the Helvetii in 58 BC.
Have You Seen?
In August we previewed the six new weapon titles coming in 2018. From 5 BC to the 1950s, next year’s releases truly epitomise the breadth of history WPN allows us to cover. To read more about the 60­–65th additions to the series, head to the Big Reveal.
Bestsellers
With over 50 titles to choose from, we thought we'd help you out a bit and showcase some of our recent popular books.





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If you’re a fan of our WPN series, we’d love to hear about your favourite! Share your thoughts in the comments! And don't forget to head to the sales page to browse all the titles on offer in this month's sale.
2. Six Facts about Felix von Luckner - 2017-09-20 17:48:00

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World War I can often be viewed in black-and-white; a conflict of trenches, machine guns, mud and mass slaughter.
Felix von Luckner shatters this perception, shining in vivid technicolour. A larger-than-life German aristocrat, von Luckner had an extraordinary war, serving at the battles of Heligoland Bight and Jutland, before being given command of the SMS Seeadler. A three-masted windjammer, the Seeadler, was a commerce raider and under his command it wreaked havoc with Allied shipping in the Atlantic and the Pacific.
Yet this was a different kind of war – one fought under old fashioned notions of gentlemanly conduct. Despite the Seeadler capturing and destroying fourteen ships, only one life was lost, and von Luckner was famed for the generous and lavish way in which he treated his prisoners.
To celebrate the publication of The Sea Devil, we thought that we would share with you six extraordinary facts about the life of this unforgettable naval commander.



1. His great-grandfather was a Marshal of France during the French Revolution.
Felix von Luckner came from an old Prussian family which had an impressive pedigree with its military service. His great-grandfather Nicolaus von Luckner was a Bavarian who had fought with the Hanoverians during the Seven Years War, before siding with Revolutionary France and becoming commander of the Army of the Rhine and a Marshal of France. Unfortunately, he fell afoul of the Revolutionary tribunal, and was executed by guillotine during the Reign of Terror in 1794.
2. Before joining the Imperial German Navy he had a number of extremely eclectic jobs.
Given that every member of his family in recent memory had served in the cavalry, it was expected that he would follow in the family tradition. Instead he felt the call of the sea, and so he ran away from home under an assumed name to serve as an unpaid cabin boy aboard the Niobe, a Russian tall ship, where his duties involved clearing out the latrines and mucking out the pigsty. Later, he graduated to such roles as as a member of the Australian Salvation Army, lighthouse keeper’s assistant, kangaroo hunter, boxer, soldier in the Mexican army, before finally ending up as a beggar in Jamaica. It was there that he joined the navy of his homeland and began his rise up the ranks that would eventually lead him being given command of the SMS Seeadler.
3. He dressed up one the ship’s crew as a woman in order to fool a British boarding party.
In order to get the Seeadler past the Royal Navy blockade he had to make serious modifications to dress his ship as a Norwegian clipper, but he also had to make plans to fool a British officer in case one came on board. He discovered that Schmidt, one of the mechanic’s assistants, had suitably feminine features, and so appropriated him as his ‘wife’, fitting him out with a dress, fake breasts and a blonde wig.
4. He employed ingenious ruses to destroy merchant shipping.
An example of this is the story of the capture of the Horngarth. He tricked the state-of-the-art armed British merchant ship into coming alongside by faking a fire on board using smoke bombs and having his ‘wife’ run around on deck in a panic. After Horngarth came within close range, Seeadler opened fire, but the fight was still in the balance. That is until the Seeadler’s crew was ordered to prepare to ‘fire their torpedoes’, which induced the British ship to surrender. It was only after he was brought on board that the British captain realised that there never were any torpedoes aboard the Seeadler.
5. His prisoners were treated lavishly with champagne-fuelled parties.
Belying the Allied stories of Teutonic barbarity, von Luckner was famed for his ‘Captain’s Club’ dinners, where he treated his captive audience to generous meals washed down with fancy wines and champagne, serenaded by the ship’s band. His prisoners came to respect the officer that had sunk their ships, with one stating that, ‘He was a true sport and treated us all fair and square... we were treated with the utmost courtesy throughout and allowed the run of the ship and the free use of the stores.’
6. He escaped from a New Zealand prison after putting on a fake Christmas play.

He was eventually captured and sent to a prisoner-of-war camp at Motuihe in New Zealand. Not content to wait out the rest of the war in captivity, he formulated an escape plan that involved persuading the camp commander to let him put on a Christmas play that involved a re-enactment of the battle of Jutland. This allowed them to assemble some realistic looking weaponry, equipment and other provisions, including a sail that was originally the theatre’s curtain, which they used to help plan a successful breakout.
The Sea Devil publishes Thursday 21 September, to preorder click here.
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1. An Interview with Gabriele Esposito - 2017-09-23 14:11:00
Today on the blog, we speak with Gabriele Esposito, author of Armies of the Italian Wars of Unification 1848–70 (1): Piedmont and the Two Sicilies, who discusses his latest book, as well as the recently announced Armies of the Italian Wars of Unification 1848–70 (2).


In a nutshell, what were the Italian Wars of Unification? Why did they begin?


Well, in a few words we could describe the three Wars of Italian Unification as the military conflicts that led to the formation of modern Italy as a unified nation. They consisted of large military confrontations between the Austrian Empire and the Kingdom of Sardinia (also known as Piedmont), the leading force of the Italian unification from a political and military point of view. Primarily the Wars of Unification were wars of liberation, because their main objective was that of freeing northern Italy from the foreign presence of the Austrians. After the Congress of Vienna (1815), the Austrian Empire had started to control Lombardy and Venetia, thus breaking again that partial political unification that Italy had achieved during the Napoleonic period. Many aspects of the Italian Wars of Unification are examples of “romantic” war fought during the period 1815–1870: a triumph of emerging national identities and middle-class ideals. This process, known in Italy as “Risorgimento”, lasted several decades and in these books I focus on the most decisive part of it, starting in 1848 and ending with the final unification of Italy in 1870. Explaining the causes that led to the Italian national resurgence in a few words is not easy, to sum up we could say that the Napoleonic era had gradually increased the sense of patriotism in all Italians and that after the Congress of Vienna, Liberal ideas had become dominant in the peninsula. As a result the middle classes of all the Italian states started to fight for the unification of Italy and for total independence from Austrian influence. Something similar happened in various other European states of the period: Germany, Hungary, Poland, Greece, Belgium and others. After all the Europe that we know today was forged during post-Napoleonic 19th century.

How did you decide to focus on this topic?


My primary objective since becoming an Osprey author for the Men-at- Arms series has always been that of covering little known armies and conflicts. That is why I started by writing books on the wars of Latin America, which had been requested by readers for some time. When I decide to propose a topic for a book my choices are always strongly influenced by the request of the readers. The Men-at-Arms series is a very large one, with an impressive backlist of more than 500 titles: some may think that finding new topics for it could be difficult, but here are so many gaps to be filled and that is exactly what I always try to do. The armies of the Italian Risorgimento were probably one of the biggest gaps to be covered regarding 19th century history, since I had all the needed competence and information to write about this topic, I decided to propose it to the Men-at-Arms’ series editor Martin Windrow. He was very enthusiastic about the idea from the beginning, so we decided to go on with it by splitting the idea into two titles. The amount of information that I have on the military history of the Italian Wars of Unification is incredibly vast, so we needed the space of at least two books. In any case, it was terribly difficult to concentrate everything into such a small space. However, I think that nothing important has been missed.

This is the first in a series, was there any particular reason why you chose to focus on Piedmont and Naples first?


In total the series will cover the armies of eleven different states, plus the volunteers of Garibaldi, Piedmont, Naples, Papal States, Grand Duchy of Tuscany, Duchy of Modena, Duchy of Parma, Kingdom of Sicily, Provisional Government of Lombardy, Republic of San Marco, Roman Republic and Central Italian League. The first six were the original Italian states that existed before the revolutionary events of 1848–1849, the following four were created by the Italian patriots during the turbulent political events of 1848 (they were short-lived revolutionary states) and the Central Italian League was a temporary confederation created soon after the end of the Second War of Unification (1859). Finally, Garibaldi’s volunteers had a long history: from the “Italian Legion” of 1848 to the “Cacciatori delle Alpi” of 1859, then the famous “Red Shirts” of 1860 and the “Corpo Volontari Italiani” of 1866. Considering this incredibly vast amount of content we had to divide the 12 military forces in some way. I decided to do this according to the amount of information available for each of them, so the two military powers of Italy were assembled together in the first volume. Piedmont had the best army of the Italian peninsula, an elite force that was capable of confronting a major European military power like Austria. Naples (the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies) had a very large army composed by a large number of different troop types (all with peculiar uniforms). So it was absolutely necessary to have a large amount of space to cover these two armies in an effective way. I would like to add that this first book will also cover the Italian Army during its first years, from 1861 to 1870. I will analyze the gradual transformation of the Piedmontese Army into the Italian one, describing the first combat experiences of the latter (Third War of Unification against Austria and the fight against Brigandage). Just a final note regarding Brigandage, very few people outside Italy probably know that during 1861–1870 the Italian military forces were heavily involved in a harsh counter-guerrilla conflict in the southern part of the peninsula, against violent bands of insurgents financed by the Bourbons of Naples (just expelled from their ex-realm). In the first book of the series there will be some space to discuss this.

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Soldiers and an Officer from the Neapolitan and Sicilian Armies, 1848

These two armies would later turn against each other, why is that?


Yes, this happened in 1860–1861. After victory in the Second War Unification, Piedmont was able to occupy most of Italy and only the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies remained independent, under the Bourbons of Naples. Cavour, Prime Minister of Piedmont, needed a “casus belli” in order to attack the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies, he had already annexed Lombardy and most of central Italy, so a large direct attack under the eyes of the European powers had to be avoided. As a result, the Piedmontese decided to leave the initiative in the hands of the greatest Italian patriot, Giuseppe Garibaldi. He landed in Sicily with just 1,089 volunteers and was soon able to defeat the Neapolitan soldiers in several clashes. The population of the island soon acclaimed him and thus the initial “Red Shirts” were soon augmented with the inclusion of hundreds of new volunteers. At this point, with Sicily in the hands of Garibaldi, the Piedmontese government started to provide official support to the Red Shirts. The expeditions of reinforcements and supplies coming from the north decisively helped Garibaldi in his conquest of southern Italy, which culminated with his great victory of the Volturno River (a battle that was fought a few miles from where I live). At this point the Piedmontese sent their army across the Papal States, in order to close the match with the Bourbons. The Neapolitan Army was then besieged in its last stronghold of Gaeta, whose conquest by the Piedmontese finally led to the birth of modern Italy. After all the Piedmontese and Neapolitan military forces fought against each other for just a few months during the siege of Gaeta, but this were extremely important for the history of Italy and ended with Piedmontese triumph.

There were three major wars involved; will this series cover each specifically? How is this broken down in the book?


Our series is formed by two Men-at-Arms books, so it is not specifically devoted to the analysis of conflicts. As I described before, the structure and contents are based on armies and not on conflicts. In any case all three wars will be covered with a general overview, which is absolutely needed if we want to understand the military history of the Risorgimento. For this reason we have included a large and detailed chronology covering the period 1848–1870. The first book will detail the years of the First War of Unification (1848–1849); the second one will cover the final half of the chronology, with the events of the Second and Third Wars of Unification (respectively 1859 and 1866). All the significant events between one conflict and the other, however, are covered. The First War of Unification was fought in every corner of Italy and saw the involvement of thousands and thousands of volunteers. It ended in 1849 without achieving major political results, but it had created the basis for the future victory of the Italians. The Second War of Unification, thanks to the decisive military support of France, was the conflict that effectively won Italy its independence from Austria. The Third War of Unification, instead, was extremely negative from a military point of view but quite positive from a political one. The young Italian Army was defeated by the Austrians at Custoza, but the alliance of Italy with Prussia led to the liberation of Venetia from Austrian rule. The Risorgimento was a long struggle for freedom, characterized by great acts of heroism. I hope that my readers will enjoy reading about it as much as I enjoyed writing about it.

You’re currently working on the second part of this series, which armies will this look at?



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I’ve concluded writing the second book a couple of days ago. It will cover the following states and their relative armies: Papal States, Grand Duchy of Tuscany, Duchy of Modena, Duchy of Parma, Kingdom of Sicily, Lombard Provisional Government, Republic of San Marco, Roman Republic and Central Italian League. In addition, there will be large portion dedicated to Garibaldi’s volunteers. The Papal States were a medium military power in Italy, since their armed forces were not as small as those of the other states from central Italy. In addition, the Pope could count on large numbers of volunteers who came from several countries of Europe to protect the Papal States. The Grand Duchy of Tuscany and the Duchies of Modena and Parma had smaller armies, mainly performing police duties, after all these states did not need large military forces, because they were ruled by minor branches of the Habsburg family and thus could count on the protection of the large Austrian Army. The uniforms of these little armies, however, were extremely interesting from the uniformologist’s point of view. The military forces of the four revolutionary states formed during 1848–1849 (Kingdom of Sicily, Lombard Provisional Government, Republic of San Marco and Roman Republic) have never been studied before in English, volume two of our series will cover all of them, with great detail. The same can be said for the army of the Central Italian League, a military force that is barely known to anyone other than Italian specialists. Finally, Garibaldi’s volunteers will be presented with great accuracy: from the first unit created in 1848 to the large corps of “Volontari Italiani” (Italian Volunteers) that fought in 1866 against the Austrians.
Men-at-Arms 512: Armies of the Italian Wars of Unification 1848–70 (1) is now available to order from our website, to order click here, and be sure to look for Gabriele's upcoming titles Armies of the First Carlist War 1833–39 and Armies of the Italian Wars of Unification 1848–70 (2): Papal States, Minor States & Volunteers.
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1. MAA 513 - An Interview with Bouko de Groot - 2017-09-26 15:00:00
It's time for another interview on the Osprey blog - today we're talking with author of MAA 513: Dutch Armies of the 80 Years’ War 1568–1648 (2): Cavalry, Artillery & Engineers, Bouko de Groot.

Osprey’s web store sold out of the first print of volume one (MAA 510) within three weeks. How about that?


Yes, that was pretty amazing. I guess a lot of people have been waiting for someone to finally fill in this grey area of the map and I’m very happy to be that ‘map maker’. Instead of simply distilling existing Dutch literature (which lacks many in depth details), I decided early on to go back to the real sources, written by the men who experienced the period and developed the reforms and its military revolution. The importance of that revolution – the introduction of drill – is still overlooked by many, I think primarily because they wrongly assume regularly exercising is the same as being drilled.

We all know the infantryman’s individual drill, from the detailed drawings of De Gheyn. What about the cavalry?


Maurice of Nassau reformed his cavalry along the same lines as his infantry. Individual drill was introduced (including similar sets of drawings), and also unit drill, which made the already small units much more manoeuvrable. He preferred lancers at first, but their high training cost and decreasing impact, due to increasingly thicker armour, made him transform all his heavies into cuirassiers. One of the myths circulated about the 80 Years’ War is that there wasn’t much cavalry action (supposedly because the whole country was one vast swamp, crisscrossed by dikes). But the States’ army tended to have the same horse-to-foot ratio as land-based armies of the time. Until well into the 1620s, heavily armoured cuirassiers formed the vast majority of Maurice’s cavalry: imagine a Napoleonic cuirassier, but clad in metal from the knee up, with bullet-proof (yes!) breast, back and head. In most battles, cavalry was the deciding factor. In the final years, along the swampy coast of Flanders, cavalry even decided many a siege, by fanning out far and wide to take vital landmarks and cut off enemy forces.

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Maurician pistoleers (called cuirassiers), as they would have looked in the beginning, at the battle of Turnhout in 1597: no mythical caracoling pistoleers but real hard charging swordsmen (1590s, by Jacob de Gheyn, Rijksmuseum Amsterdam).

Drill and standardization: was that used to reform artillery as well?


The artillery’s main problems were a lack of standardization, the great weight of the guns, and the logistical nightmare of keeping up with a marching army and the volumes of fire during a siege. Standardizing the guns themselves wasn’t enough. The army’s stores and train also needed to be organized. Under Maurice, rigorous bookkeeping was introduced, together with minimum stock requirements, but also standard carriages. He himself was heavily involved in developing a whole new type of artillery, weighing a fraction of the normal type and ideally suited for battlefield use, basically the first successful infantry guns. Another type he specialized was what would later be called horse artillery; highly mobile and independent guns used to block or take landmarks. Although the States’ army didn’t name the concept of ‘battery’, it did organize its battlefield artillery in groups of six.

In volume one, you included a chronological list of over 100 battles, mentioning that volume two would have a list of sieges. Will it?


Yes, I thought it was better to split them up. Volume two has the same map as volume one, but now shows all the sieges. There were more than 150, or an average of two sieges a year, during the 80 years of war. That may seem a lot for a small area like the 17 Provinces (today’s Netherlands, Belgium, Luxemburg and parts of northern France and western Germany). But even back then, the area had a high density of towns and cities. Plus the real focus of the war was on money and who had most to spend. Cities are vital in controlling income, resources and traffic. For those reasons, right from the beginning, sieges played an important role. The start of the war is commonly put at the date of the Battle of Heiligerlee in 1568 (actually one of several battles fought near that monastery), but the general rebellion really got started with the capture and – more importantly – the retention of the first city, Den Briel in 1572. The number of sieges is even higher if we include small forts and the like. However, as there were too many of these smaller actions to cover, only a handful of them ̶ the really important ones – made the cut.

Sieges are time consuming and costly: is there a reason why there were more sieges than battles?

As the war went on, sieges became more professional and more business-like. Army logistics and finances became very well organized under Simon Stevin, a leading mathematician of his day (Maurice co-wrote several treatises with him). Everything had to be accounted and thus planned for. As a result, the outcome of sieges could be calculated, whereas the outcome of battles, of course, could not. That’s why Maurice – but also his opponents – would only resort to battle if there was no other option, or if he held the advantage. Sometimes he’d march and deploy his army merely as a threat, taking the initiative away from his opponent. He’d sooner march off in good order than risk a battle against a similar sized army - being able to march off without a single scratch time and time again is in itself a remarkable feat. In Germany, sieges seem to have played a much smaller role. Maurice was proven right: none of those big, bloody 30YW battles were ever really decisive and victorious armies rarely fared any better than their defeated opponents in the months after.
All that aside, the fighting during sieges tended to be more vicious and much bloodier than open battle, although usually on a smaller scale. Besides assaults and trench raids above the ground, there was underground bloodshed too, when one mining party would meet another. The fights might be as small as two versus two, but in narrow, hot and suffocating tunnels, without mercy, and without survivors on the losing side.

Изображение
‘Combined arms’ assault by Maurice’s army on Delfzijl in 1591, blocking Groningen’s major sea access (NE of The Netherlands, opposite Emden). Royalist (pro-Spain) Groningen would fall three years later (1592, by Frans Hogenberg, Rijksmuseum Amsterdam).

Do you look at the armies that were needed to fight the battles and sieges as well?


Well yes, at the end of volume two, I explain how the different arms cooperated at the highest level. We are lucky that many sketches have survived of how the States’ armies deployed. Interestingly though, the exact position of the artillery is hardly ever shown, let alone the location of the new, relatively secret ‘arms’, the infantry guns and the dedicated skirmisher companies. However diaries and the like provide us with that missing information. If you look at the diagram of such an army deployment it looks quite modern and could have been drawn two–300 years later. That raises some interesting questions, especially if you know that the army had already partly switched to flintlocks by the end of the war. Perhaps you are familiar with the discussions in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries about the benefits of advancing (part of) the foot with unloaded muskets and bayonets fixed, and about charging in some kind of columnar formation instead of an unbroken line. One then wonders how a 1630s States’ army would have fared in that environment, because it basically was a line of advancing columns, where the front of each column was dedicated to melee and the rear to fire (fanning out ‘platoon’-wise), supported by canister shooting lightweight guns advancing alongside in the intervals. Anyway, that’s not a discussion for this title, but nevertheless quite interesting.

You just mentioned diagrams: volume one had several very informative diagrams. What about volume two?


The same. In volume one the infantry formations were explained using diagrams, from ‘batallion’ right up to ‘brigade’, and those compared to other armies. In volume two I do the same with cavalry, plus, like I said, the army. Apart from those four diagrams and the map with sieges, you’ll find a table with the specifications of post-1620 artillery types, and of course the beautiful colour illustrations by Gerry Embleton: 12 cavalry (four mounted), two artillery pieces, three other men and nine pennons and banners. And meanwhile my research continues: it sometimes seems as if in every new period text I read, I discover a battle that’s been forgotten. Those and the steadily growing bibliography can be found on 80yw.org. Expect more of my 80YW titles with Osprey in 2018!
If you enjoyed this, then be sure to have a read of our first interview with Bouko back in March, by clicking here. Bouko's newest book Dutch Armies of the 80 Years’ War 1568–1648 (2) is now available, click the title to get your copy.
2. Zoo Ball: Creating the King of Sports - 2017-09-26 07:27:00
“To make a great sports board game from scratch, first you must invent a sport.”
- Neil DeGrasse-Tyson
Hello! Duncan Molloy here. I’m the developer of board and card games at Osprey Games, and the designer of Zoo Ball, our new dexterity game. I was asked to write a little bit about the game, so here goes!
Here is what Zoo Ball is like:
1) Zoo Ball is like four-player combat pool.
2) Zoo Ball is like crokinole with defensive formations.
3) Zoo Ball is somewhere between olympic curling and Super Smash Bros.
4) Zoo Ball comes with a 30” square fabric mat and customisable teams.
Now that I’ve gotten that out of the way, let’s talk about sports.

Изображение

SPORTS!
Artwork by Lauren Dawson

Simulating a sport in board games is properly difficult. There’s a bunch of reasons for this, but mainly it’s simple - if the sport is easy to simulate, why don’t we just play the sport?
It’s the reason why really good sports board games tend to simulate the culture of sports rather than the sport itself. Bloodbowl: Team Manager is a perfect example, doing a great job of capturing the feel of a season of American football by completely ignoring the rules of American football.
My task was a little different, as I wanted to capture the atmosphere of something in play, but lower the barrier to entry. The sport I was after here was rugby. It’s similar to American football, with some key differences:
1) Play doesn’t stop when there’s a down.
2) You can’t tackle/interfere with play off the ball, i.e. you have to tackle the player who currently has possession.
3) You can’t tackle a player from behind or the side, unless they took the ball past you - i.e. you can’t run around in a big loop, play must move through the ball.
4) You can’t throw the ball forwards (though you can kick it, which is seen as riskier).
This leads to a compelling game state where the ball itself becomes the moving centre point of an hourglass shape through which all of the action filters. Like American football, a rugby team is roughly evenly split between a group of burlier, stronger forwards (sometimes referred to as ‘the pack’), and a group of leaner, faster backs. Unlike football, the job of the pack isn’t just to target/defend the backs, it’s also to create space by drawing as many of the opposition’s players into the centre of that hour glass, then quickly moving the ball out wide to the edges of the field where the defensive formation has broken down.
It’s that risk/reward of committing just enough defensively to allow you to also attack effectively that I wanted to capture, but it wasn’t going to happen by trying to simulate thirty men tactically smacking each other around. Instead I tried to break it down to it’s component parts - your blockers trend towards defense and moving as a unit, but are not limited to it. Your scorer tends to move more widely, but can act as a last ditch defender when needed. It became clear that to make the sports game I wanted, the trick wasn’t to invent the game, it was to invent the sport.

Изображение
Like this, but less painful.
By Clément Bucco-Lechat - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons.
Most sports arrive at rules via play, rather than the other way around, and that’s where I started. Flicking discs on a table is great fun. Flicking them on a mat felt better. Snooker/pool is a lot of fun, but lining up a great shot and not-quite sinking it felt frustrating, as it was handing points to your opponent. No shared scoring pieces then. So how do you score? You are your own ball. If you’ve got a single scorer, what’s enough for a good defensive formation? And everything spun out from there.
Here’s how to play Zoo Ball:
Everyone’s got 4 discs - 3 blockers and a scorer. On your turn you can flick any or all of your blockers, or flick just your scorer. If you go off the mat, you come back on the side closest to your own goal. Only your scorer can score, but blockers can knock scorers into the goal.
Play usually falls into an ebb-and-flow of momentum, where some clever defensive moves, or a poor attack from an opponent, will allow an opportunity to push for goal. If playtesting is anything to go by a local meta is likely to develop, with prominent starting positions, and direct counters to those.
This is a troublingly good shot...
I wanted to capture the pure fun energy of rugby, but have ended up somewhere entirely different, with little bits of soccer, and boules, and playground games in the mix. The important bit remains though: like rugby, Zoo Ball is a game where tactical positioning is as important as skill, but where neither of those dominate the joy of play.
And for that reason, I offer the sport of Zoo Ball for your consideration to the Olympic committee. Any help readers can provide to progress in this venture would be greatly appreciated. I mean, if it’s good enough for darts...

Изображение

Artwork by Lauren Dawson
Zoo Ball is our new 2/4 player dexterity game that pits teams of animals against one another in a bid to become the jungle MVP. Grab your copy today, and if you're attending SPIEL '17 come and give us a game at our booth (7B101)
3. The Churchill Archive - 2017-09-25 15:31:00

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Would you like to explore the top-secret telegrams, private letters, speeches, photographs and newspaper reports stored within the Churchill Archive online?

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The
Churchill Archive is newly available outside academic institutions, giving unprecedented online access to all those interested in the life of Sir Winston Churchill and the fascinating era in which he lived. It contains more than 800,000 pages of original documents produced during Churchill’s lifetime. This iconic collection is internationally recognized as a cultural treasure and has been added to UNESCO’s International Memory of the World Register. For a bit more information on the archive, click here.

Osprey customers can buy an individual subscription at the special early bird price of £255 for six months or £425 for twelve months.* Simply email https://ospreypublishing.com/churchilla ... msbury.com for more information or to make a purchase. Offer ends 31st December 2017.
*This offer is unavailable for customers in the United States, South/Latin America, Canada and the Caribbean.
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1. Sneak Peek at December's Artwork - 2017-09-29 12:00:00
New artwork blogs are always a fun post to put together, and if you’re a fan of our Aircraft of the Aces series, you’re in for even more of a treat as we’re featuring two plates from our upcoming December titles.
As always, have a read of the captions, take in the artwork and let us know which of these books you’ve got your eye on.
ACE 134: Jagdgeschwader 1 ‘Oesau’ Aces 1939–45 by Robert Forsyth
Illustrated by Jim Laurier

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This first plate is from Jagdgeschwader 1 ‘Oesau’ Aces 1939–45, and features the He 162A-2 Wk-Nr 120074 'Yellow 11' of Oberleutnant Karl-Emil Demuth, acting Kommandeur I./JG 1, Leck, May 1945. As this plate shows, the aircraft has a distinctive design, from the red, white and black rings on its nose to the red Geschwader arrows behind it. You can also just about see Gruppe's 'Devil in the Clouds' emblem below the cockpit.
MAA 515: Armies of the First Carlist War 1833–39 by Gabriele Esposito
Illustrated by Giuseppe Rava

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The next plate is from Armies of the First Carlist War 1833–39, and is a stunning depiction of the Spanish Liberal infantry. From left to right, the artwork depicts a Sergeant of the Naval Infantry (1834), a Grenadier of the Line Regiment ‘Rey’ (1835), a Sergeant of the Cazadores Regiment (1836), and a Cazador of the ‘Cazadores del Rey’ regiment (1833).
ACE 136: Allied Jet Killers of World War 2 by Stephen Chapis and Andrew Thomas
Illustrated by Jim Laurier

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This next plate from Allied Jet Killers of World War 2 shows the P-51D-5 44-13317 of Captain Freddie Glover of the 336th FS/4th FG. On 2 November 1944, Glover shot down a Me 163. On that day he was flying Capt Donald Emerson’s Mustang, which had originally boasted the fight-ready ‘Donald Duck’ nose art, which is easily my favourite part of this image and one of the main reasons I decided to include it in this month's reveal, if I'm being honest.
Which of these books will be making your to-read list? All three are available to pre-order by clicking here, and will be published 28 December.
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1. October's Book Vote and September's Results - 2017-10-02 15:11:29
It's the start of a new month, which can only mean one thing for the blog: a new book vote post! This October's vote looks at our Duel series, as 10 more machines of war are pitted against each other. Take a read of the options below and their brief descriptions and as always vote for your favourite!




DUE - Humber vs SdKfz 222: Armoured cars in North Africa 1941–3
DUE - M41 Walker Bulldog vs T-54: Laos 1971
DUE - British Coastal Gun vs German Coastal Gun: English Channel 1940–44
DUE - Hunley vs Housatonic: Civil War submarine operations 1864
DUE - US Coast Guard Cutter vs German Submarine: Atlantic 1941–43






Humber vs SdKfz 222: Armoured cars in North Africa 1941­–3
Highly mobile but lightly armed and armoured, armoured cars were extensively used by British and German reconnaissance forces during the back-and-forth campaigns in North Africa.
M41 Walker Bulldog vs T-54: Laos 1971
At the height of the Vietnam War the US-built M41 Walker Bulldog light tank, fielded by the Army of the Republic of Vietnam, clashed with the Soviet-supplied T-54, the most powerful tank arming the North Vietnamese Army.
British Coastal Gun vs German Coastal Gun: English Channel 1940–44
The four-year duel between German and British super-heavy artillery across the English Channel saw frequent exchanges of fire between these long-range guns, which also shelled enemy shipping and other shore-based targets.
Hunley vs Housatonic: Civil War submarine operations 1864
In the first recorded sinking of a surface ship by a submarine, the Confederacy’s Hunley attacked and sank the Union’s Housatonic in Charleston harbour on February 17, 1864.
US Coast Guard Cutter vs German Submarine: Atlantic 1941–43
During a crucial period in the Battle of the Atlantic the cutters of the US Coast Guard played an important role in countering the menace to Allied shipping posed by Nazi Germany’s U-boats.

Make your vote by clicking here!
Now it's time to reveal the results of last month's book vote. Last month's selections were possible titles in our Air Campaign series. The winner with a very respectable 33.14% was Austria 1915-18: Italy's air campaign from the Adriatic to Vienna, with second place going to Operation Black Buck 1982: Vulcans over Port Stanley with 21.21% of the vote. Thanks to everyone who cast their vote, and don't forget to have your say in this month's Book Vote.



ACM: Austria 1915-18: Italy’s air campaign from the Adriatic to Vienna
33.14%


ACM: The Ruhr 1943: The campaign against Germany’s industrial heartland
18.61%


ACM: Operation Strangle 1943-44: Pioneering air interdiction in Italy
9.08%


ACM: Japan 1945: Carrier raids against the Home Islands
17.96%


ACM: Operation Black Buck 1982: Vulcans over Port Stanley
21.21%
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1. SPIEL '17 Preorders - 2017-10-04 07:27:00
Osprey Games will be attending SPIEL ’17 in Essen, Germany, where we will be showcasing our games at Booth 7B101. We look forward to seeing you there!
This year at SPIEL we will be launching 3 titles – Samurai Gardener, Star Cartel, and a new edition of Martin Wallace’s classic tableau-builder London! We’re very excited to be bringing you these games, and from the messages we’ve received so far it seems a lot of you are too!
To make sure people don’t miss out on the games they want, we’re now accepting preorders on all the games we are bringing to the show! All you need to do is send an email to us at https://ospreypublishing.com/info@ospreygames.co.uk and let us know which games you are interested in. We’re happy to keep these to one side until 12pm on Saturday to give you time to come and get the games you are most excited by! Any games not collected by 12pm will be returned to general stock.





Game
Price


London
€45


Star Cartel
€25


Samurai Gardener
€15


Zoo Ball
€25


The Lost Exepedition
€25


Shahrazad
€15


Escape from Colditz
€55


Agamemnon
€20


Let Them Eat Cake
€20


The Ravens of Thri Sahashri
€15


Escape from the Aliens
€30


Odin's Ravens
€20


They Come Unseen
€45


Secret Santa
€10





As an added incentive to pick up your order early, we're going to have 2 different promos for The Lost Expedition available at our stand, as well as a promotional team for Zoo Ball. While stocks last, all collected preorders over €20 will receive their choice of promo pack!
Please send your preorder requests by Tuesday 17th October so we can make sure we have the games for you!
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Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България
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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 06 окт 2017, 00:00

Blog
Blog

1. EpicHistoryTV's Alexander the Great - Parts One & Two - 2017-10-05 13:45:00
We've partnered up with Epic History TV once again to bring you another fantastic video series. Our previous sponsored videos have looked at the Battle of the Somme and the First Crusade, which you can watch by visiting the Epic History TV YouTube channel. This time Osprey artwork, detailed animated maps and total war game footage come together to tell the story of Alexander the Great's conquest of the known world.
Parts One and Two are already live and are a fantastic introduction to the infamous conquerer.


If you enjoyed this, see more from EpicHistoryTV over on their YouTube channel here. Inspired to read more about Alexander the Great? Check out our related titles:





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Don't forget to let us know what you think of this incredible new YouTube series!
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