Новини - литература и периодика - Архив 2019г.

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1. December Book Vote and Last Month's Results - 2019-12-02 10:05:00
It's the final book vote of the year. This December sees us take to the skies, with five Combat Aircraft books battling it out for your vote. Have a read of the titles and their descriptions below and then vote for which title you'd like to see join the COM list.

COM: RB-47 Units in Combat

COM: Ju 52/3m Transport and Minesweeping Units 1941-45 COM: USAF and USMC RF-4 Phantom II Units of the Vietnam War
COM: USAAF A-20 Havoc Units of the ETO/MTO

COM: Macchi C.202 Folgore and C.205V Veltro Units in Combat


RB-47 Units in Combat
Throughout its brief operational life time the Boeing B-47 earned a reputation as a Strategic Air Command bomber that never saw combat. In fact, multiple reconnaissance variants of the B-47 were involved in aerial combat between 1952 and 1965, with three shot down or damaged beyond repair. Intercepts by hostile fighters were far more common, and crews were frequently awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross for valor under extremely hazardous conditions. This is the story of these clandestine missions during the height of Cold War confrontation between the United States and the Soviet Union.

Ju 52/3m Transport and Minesweeping Units 1941-45
The Ju 52/3m was the backbone of the Luftwaffe – a crucial link in the ‘supply chain’ for German forces on every battlefront, but also offering flexibility into other combat roles such as minesweeping. Without it, and the bravery and dedication of its crews, many German victories and war aims would not have been possible.

USAF and USMC RF-4 Phantom II Units of the Vietnam War
Aviators in the USAF and USMC RF-4 units flew some of the most dangerous missions of the war, particularly when they had to follow up airstrikes to provide bomb damage assessment. Unarmed, they were required to fly straight and level along predictable routes against defences which were well prepared for their arrival.

USAAF A-20 Havoc Units of the ETO/MTO
The Havoc can be listed among the lesser known Allied war-winners of World War 2, being the first American-built and USAAF manned bomber to attack Europe in World War 2. It played a major role in neutralising crucial German airfields and railway marshalling yards prior to D-Day, destroying key bridges to trap retreating German armour from the Falaise Pocket, making key interventions against road and rail networks during the Battle of the Bulge and in providing accurate and devastating close support for the American armies in their advance across North Africa, Sicily, Italy and northwest Europe.

Macchi C.202 Folgore and C.205V Veltro Units in Combat
Macchi’s C.202 Folgore (Thunderbolt) and follow-on C.205V Veltro (Greyhound) were, by some margin, the most potent Italian-built fighters fielded by the Regia Aeronautica and the fascist Aeronautica Nazionale Repubblicana (ANR) in World War 2. Indeed, thanks to their licence-built Daimler-Benz engines, the aircraft could more than hold their own against the best Allied fighters in the Mediterranean and North Africa.

Make your vote by clicking here!
Last month we asked you what would you like to see published in our Elite series. Thank you to everyone who voted and provided feedback, the full results are listed below!
ELI: European Battle Tactics 1715–91 15% ELI: European Siege Tactics 1453–1815 11% ELI: Close Air Support Tactics 1914–45 27% ELI: Armies of the Indo-Pakistani Wars 1947–71 26% ELI: The Athenian Army 20%

Did your favourite win? Which Combat Aircraft title did you vote for? Let us know in the comments!


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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 03 дек 2019, 18:00

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1. Christmas Delivery 2019 - 2019-12-03 09:33:32
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Christmas is fast approaching, so we wanted to share with you all some information regarding Christmas delivery!
To ensure your orders arrive in time for Christmas, please place them before Monday 9 December if you're in the US and Wednesday 11 December if you're in the UK.

For overseas orders, we will be working hard alongside our distributors to ensure a timely delivery, but unfortunately, we cannot account for post in your region.
Whilst we cannot guarantee Christmas delivery for print on demand titles, we do not currently anticipate any additional delays.
To help you get the perfect gifts this year, we have extended our Black Friday sale until Wednesday 11 December.
Browse the website for 30% off selected books, eBooks and games!


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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 06 дек 2019, 18:00

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1. Osprey's Christmas Gift Guide 2019 - 2019-12-04 12:41:27
Are you looking for the perfect present for someone this Christmas? With a few days left of our 30% off sale, we've put together a guide of books included in the sale that make great gifts!
To ensure your orders arrive in time for Christmas, please place them before Monday 9 December if you're in the US and Wednesday 11 December if you're in the UK. Click here for more information regarding Christmas delivery.
Armour
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Soviet T-55 Main Battle Tank
Containing more than 400 stunning contemporary and modern photographs, and written by two experts on Soviet armour, this authoritative book tells the complete story of the T-55, one of the most widely produced tanks of all time.

Panzerartillerie
Drawing on original material from German archives and private collections, including some images that have never been published before, German armour expert Thomas Anderson explores the formation and development of this force from its early days in the 1930s, through the glory days of Blitzkrieg warfare to its eventual decline in the face of the challenges of the Eastern Front.

Tanks
From the primitive, bizarre-looking Mark V to the Matilda and from the menacing King Tiger to the superlative M1 Abrams, Professor Ogorkiewicz shows how tanks gradually acquired the enhanced capabilities that enabled them to become what they are today - the core of combined-arms, mechanized warfare.



Aviation:
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Air Combat
The battle for the skies in World War II fuelled a race between rival air forces to develop ever faster and more capable fighter aircraft - and the struggle for air superiority was never over until the war itself ended. Air Combat explores clashes of some of the finest planes and pilots, in key theatres of the war.

Storm of Eagles
This remarkable volume is a must-have for anyone interested in World War II aviation, combining classic photographs with never-before-seen wartime images.
Naval:
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German submarine U-1105 'Black Panther'
This highly illustrated book uses many new and previously unpublished images to tell the full story of this remarkable U-Boat, evaluating the effectiveness of its late war technologies, document its extensive postwar testing and detail all the features still present on the wreck site today.

Scapa 1919
In June 1919, the German High Seas Fleet attempted to sink itself in the Flow to prevent it being broken up as war prizes. Of the 74 ships present, 52 sunk and 22 were prevented from doing so by circumstance and British intervention. Marine archaeologist and historian Dr Innes McCartney reveals for the first time what became of the warships that were scuttled, examining the circumstances behind the loss of each ship and reconciling what was known at the time to what the archaeology is telling us today.

Cold War Fleet
Created by two of the most acclaimed naval photographers in the world, this stunning book is a window back in time to the Royal Navy of the Cold War, showing a fleet created to defend Britain and other NATO countries from Soviet attack. Featuring every kind of ship from aircraft carriers and destroyers to auxiliary vessels, this is a peerless resource for any enthusiast of naval history.
World War II

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Atlas of the Blitzkrieg
In September 1939, Nazi Germany launched its infamous Blitzkrieg invasion of Poland, bringing about the outbreak of World War II. Faced with highly tactical and accelerated attacks aimed at disrupting the line of defence and encircling vulnerable troops, Allied forces broke under pressure. Featuring 98 detailed maps, this impressive atlas shows, in intricate detail, the fighting and physical challenges faced by the German attackers and Allied defenders.

The Second World War
This book tells the stories of the men and women who lived and died during the Second World War, from politicians to factory workers, and from High Command to the conscripted men on the front lines. The experience of war is brought to life through a wealth of contemporary documentation, private writings and historical research, whilst the political, military and historical significance of the war is assessed and examined.

Snapdragon
Phil Stern is remembered for his iconic images of Old Hollywood stars, but his remarkable service during World War II as a combat photographer with Darby’s Rangers has remained largely unknown. Until now. Stern’s catchy 1940s lingo, honest and intimate observations, and humor, paired with his striking combat photography will transport you 70 years back in time to meet the hardscrabble Rangers and experience some of the key battles of the Mediterranean Theater.

World War II Battle by Battle
This compact gift book takes thirty of World War II's most significant clashes, both the famous and the lesser known, and presents their stories in a concise, easy to digest format, accompanied by beautiful Osprey artwork plates in full colour that illuminate a key moment in each battle.

Illustrated Histories
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The Pirate World
Often romanticised in print and on the silver screen, real-life pirates were a brutal menace that plagued the high seas. In this book, Angus Konstam separates myth from reality, tracing the history of piracy through the centuries, from the pirates who plagued the Ancient Egyptians to the Viking raids and on to the era of privateers.


Maps of War
There is little documented mapping of conflict prior to the Renaissance period, but, from the 17th century onwards, military commanders and strategists began to document the wars in which they were involved and later, to use mapping to actually plan the progress of a conflict. Using contemporary maps, this sumptuous new volume covers the history of the mapping of war on land and shows the way in which maps provide a guide to the history of war.


Forts
Forts explains the history of human fortifications, and is beautifully illustrated using photographs, plans, drawings and maps to explain why they were built, their various functions and their immense historical legacy in laying the foundations of empire.

Pocket Manuals
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Each pocket manual contains a collection of key documents that examines the history and design of various vehicles,


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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 10 дек 2019, 18:00

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1. 5 Board Games for Christmas 2019! - 2019-12-06 09:17:42
Are you looking for a new board game to play this Christmas? Here are 5 games you could bring to the tabletop for the holiday season! Judge Dredd: Helter Skelter Designed by Martin Wallace - 2-4 players / 30-60 minute play time

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Something in the multiverse has shattered, and now the universe is bleeding. Throughout Mega-City One there are reports of invaders wreaking havoc. Celtic barbarians in Ezquerra Block. Russian nobles in Apetown. And rumours of fragments of other universes, waiting to be claimed.
Head to the streets of Mega-City One with Judge Dredd: Helter Skelter, a new miniatures board game combining Martin Wallace's critically-acclaimed Wildlands rules with the worlds of 2000 AD. Four unique factions bring iconic characters from Sláine, Nikolai Dante, and Strontium Dog crashing into Mega-City One, all intent on finding the shattered fragments of their own universe and crushing anyone who gets in their way.
Things are going to get rough, but one thing is certain. No matter what universe you are from, you still have to answer to the Law!
Order your copy of Judge Dredd: Helter Skelter today! Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell: A Board Game of English Magic Designed by Marco Maggi and Francesco Nepitello - 2-4 players / 60-80 minutes

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Set during the events of the cult-classic book, Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell sees players delve into the world of English magic, developing their talents and expanding their social reach as they aim to become the most celebrated magician of the age.
Take on the role of an aspiring magician, including the titular characters Jonathan Strange and Mr Norrell themselves, and start them down the path to greatness. Build up your power and status by travelling across Europe and London, performing feats of magic and attending social engagements. The most celebrated magician will face the gentleman with the thistle-down hair, but only the strongest will defeat him.
Order your copy of Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell: A Board Game of English Magic today! Escape from the Aliens in Outer Space Designed by Santa Ragione - 2-8 players / 20-45 minutes

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A mysterious alien plague has crept aboard the spacestation and is transforming the human crew into horrendous monsters! The remaining crewmen desperately try to save their lives by escaping from the derelict spaceship, but in the darkness the aliens are lurking…
HUNGRY FOR HUMAN FLESH!
This a game of strategy and bluff set on a badly damaged deep space research station. Each player's identity and position is kept secret: you will need to interpret the movements and behaviours of the other players to learn where, and what, they really are.
Order your copy of Escape from the Aliens in Outer Space today! The Lost Expedition Designed by Peer Sylvester - 1-5 players / 30-50 minutes

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Legendary explorer Percy Fawcett marched deep into the Amazon in search of El Dorado. He was never seen again. Your team is following in his footsteps, but in searching for riches you must be careful not to lose the greatest treasure of all - your life.
Make the best of your food, your ammunition and your health, as you plunge deep into the jungle. Choose your path carefully to ensure you're ready for the pitfalls which may occur. Play solo or co-operatively to survive the expedition, or play head-to-head to see which group can reach the lost city first.
From award-winning designer Peer Sylvester and acclaimed comic artist Garen Ewing, The Lost Expedition is a game of hard choices on the road to El Dorado.
Order your copy of The Lost Expedition today! London: Second Edition Designed by Martin Wallace - 2-4 players / 60-90 minutes

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From acclaimed designer Martin Wallace and the team at Osprey Games comes London: Second Edition.
After the devastation of the great fire, many competing developers want to see their vision for the city realised. Will you combat poverty and increase employment, building iconic monuments as a testament to your ingenuity, or simply make the trains run on time?
Grow your city through the decades, as you vie to become an icon of London.
Order your copy of London: Second Edition today!


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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 12 дек 2019, 18:00

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1. Designer Blog - Game Mechanics in Paleomythic: A Roleplaying Game of Stone and Sorcery - 2019-12-11 11:56:43
Publishing on 12 December, Paleomythic: A Roleplaying Game of Stone and Sorcery is one of the two launch titles for the new Osprey Roleplaying series. Written by Graham Rose, the game transports players to the land of Ancient Mu - a harsh, prehistoric world of biting cold winters, savage predators, and hostile tribes. Today, Graham is on the blog to tell us a little more about the mechanics of the game!
I endeavoured to make Paleomythic as simple for the GM and players as possible, whilst still evoking the unique aspects of the setting. Fundamental to the game therefore is a single mechanic known as a ‘test’. Tests are used to resolve activities and events in Paleomythic, from crafting tools and gathering food, to throwing a spear or resisting the effects of a poison.
Since the sum total of the characters traits is a reflection of their overall competence and ability, a test is made based on this factor. The player rolls a number of dice six sided dice equal to the number of traits possessed by the character. If any of them result in a 6, the test is a success.
An activity will almost certainly be affected by one trait more than another. The game factors this in by conferring a bonus die to the test for a relevant trait. Thus a character with the trait agile gets a bonus die when trying to leap a ravine, a character with the trait dexterous gets a bonus die when crafting a tool and so on.

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Artwork by John McCambridge
A flaw has the opposite effect; robbing the character of a die when it is relevant to a test. A weak character loses a die when trying to lift a heavy weight, a sickly character loses a die when attempting to resist the effects of a disease.
Possessing the right tool for an activity can be very beneficial in Paleomythic. If a character attempts an activity with the correct tool, a bonus die is gained. However, tools have a habit of breaking; they are after all made from fragile or unreliable materials.
When characters engage in combat, their most valuable tool is a weapon. There are many weapons in Paleomythic, such as axes made using flint or animal claws, cudgels topped with skulls, whips lined with fangs, spears tipped with bones and more. Like tools, weapons confer a bonus die. They can also cause combat effects, such as ruining armour or inflicting bleeding wounds. However, like any other tool, weapons can break, leaving a character vulnerable to a better equipped foe.
As may be evident, combat in Paleomythic can be brutal and risky. Each time a character is wounded, they temporarily lose a trait. This affects their overall ability, making them less capable in combat as the wound takes its’ toll on the character both physically and psychologically.
Fortunately, various tactics are available to characters, and these are explained concisely so that the flow of combat isn’t interrupted by too much referencing of the rules. A character stuck for a weapon can try to take a foes, a character facing a skilled foe can perform a feint to wrong foot them. Characters can leap into combat, shove foes, smash their weapons or trick them into stepping onto sharp pottery fragments. All of this is possible and easy to resolve in Paleomythic.
Activities and hazards are covered extensively in Paleomythic. These use the simple test mechanics, and detail such actions as climbing, leaping, carrying loads, performing, scavenging and so on.

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Artwork by Mars Oosterveld
Crafting is an important activity described in this section of the rules. Every item available in the extensive list of goods can be crafted by characters, and the rules detail the materials and relevant tool required to make an item.
Other important activities, such as foraging and hunting are described. When characters forage, there are guidelines for the amount of food collected (based on the terrain and season), as well as the type of food. When hunting, the tests required to stalk a beast are detailed, so a hunt challenges a number of areas of character ability.
The world of Ancient Mu is at times brutal and full of danger. The rules therefore detail the effects of disease, poison, exposure and even the impact of fear. Again, all of these hazards are resolved using the simple test procedure.
I strived to create rules which would be unobtrusive during play, and to be easy to both learn and remember. Likewise, players will hopefully find the mechanics useable and congruent to the setting, so that they help to create adventures that are compelling and fun.
Eager to start your adventures in Ancient Mu? Order your copy of Paleomythic: A Roleplaying Game of Stone and Sorcery today!


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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 13 дек 2019, 18:01

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1. Duel Hits 100 - 2019-12-13 09:12:38
With the publication of Duel 100: Me 262 vs P-51 Mustang coming up, we asked Nikolai Bogdanovic, Duel Series Editor for land and naval warfare, to reflect on this fantastic milestone.

The milestone of 100 published titles is a momentous achievement in the life of any series, and leads to a moment of pause, reflection and certainly some celebration. After all, we must be doing something right to get that far.
Duel can now firmly consider itself one of the vieux moustaches, proudly parading alongside the sprightly 100+ veterans of Men-at-Arms (500+ and still fit to fight), New Vanguard, Aircraft of the Aces, Campaign, Combat Aircraft, Elite, Fortress, and Warrior. Chests out, you are fine examples all to more recent series recruits, and to others yet to be conceived.
Since the first titles were published back in 2007, Duel has explored a wide variety of opposing military technologies. Each ensuing year, a steady flow of titles has issued in the series, from a pleasingly broad range differing periods. We’ve covered land, sea and submarine warfare, and have ranged from Byzantium to blitzkrieg and beyond; from fighting sail to 20th-century fleet action. We’ve explored Greek fire and Indian Centurions; Chi-Has and Char B1s; Tigers, Panthers and Wolfpacks. We’ve stretched from East Rome to the Eastern Front, through uncivil Civil Wars to a long, Cold one. In its totality, the Duel series provides a fascinating overview of how competing military technologies are conceived, developed, applied, and assessed, before they are inevitably overtaken in the endless march of progress in firepower, protection and manouevre.
When any new series is born into the Osprey stable, it takes a little time for the concept to translate into something concrete; you never quite know what forms the ideas for the illustrations and text will take in the first few volumes. Once you’ve worked through the first volumes, you have a much better idea. Luckily, with Duel, this one all went smoothly and the concept stood strong from the up.
But there’s no resting on laurels. In many ways, proposing the first 100 titles has been the easy part. The next 100 will be more challenging, as we strive to offer you topics that push your research and hobby interests onward and provide fresh inspiration. We need to cast new light on by now established subject matter. What helps is the comparative approach that Duel can offer, a unique selling point.
On a reflective note, no series could reach this kind of milestone without the much-appreciated contributions of several parties.
Firstly, there are our amazing authors, who spend much of their lives researching, considering, exploring and explaining. Without their dedication to the growing body of research, knowledge and understanding, and their desire to share this with you, there would be no series at all.
Secondly, there is you, the reader. Your support for the series is never taken for granted. You tell us when we get it right, and you also tell us when you think we’ve got it wrong. With such a large output of work, across all of history, there are always going to be moot points, and long may they continue; they make our subjects more engaging and more involving – a democracy of knowledge and understanding. Your ideas and suggestions for new titles are always welcome, and do keep them coming. We’ll always seek to publish something on an interesting and important topic; although it may take a while to reach the right moment to do so, we’ll get there in the end. There’s a lot of polite queuing in series publishing.
Thirdly, we must celebrate the wonderful array of talented illustrators and cartographers who have contributed to the Duel series. Their talents translate raw research and information into stunning, vivid reconstructions, packed with detail, which help our readers understand the technologies better, and lead them to further their own research and contributions to the fields in which they specialise or find interesting.
Finally, we should salute the backroom staff, of former series editors (not least for your vision and foresight) and designers, as well as those who market and sell the books so that you know what’s coming out, when and how you can get access to it. They have all contributed to making sure our fantastic authors have an audience with which to interact.
I’m looking forward to the next 100 Duel titles. We’ve got some great topics lined up, ready to fire as an opening salvo – including a colourful examination of Spanish and English late 16th-century galleons; the German 88mm in the AT role against Allied armour in North Africa; the clash of the capital ships of the Royal Navy and the Kriegsmarine in World War II; the Pacific Theater USMC Sherman M4A2 pitted against the Japanese Type 95; US submarines and IJN anti-submarine escorts in the POA; and the fascinating array of Arab and Israeli armour employed in the 1967 Six-Day War. We’ll continue to aim for as wide a variety in subjects covered as we can, offering novelty and enticement, while seeking to maintain the highest quality that our loyal readers have come to expect. Here’s to a 200 celebration, at some future point.


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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 16 дек 2019, 18:06

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1. Visiting Thermopylae with Myke Cole (#1) - 2019-12-16 10:05:25
Osprey author, Myke Cole is on a research trip around Greece ahead of his upcoming book The Bronze Lie: Shattering the Myth of Spartan Warrior Supremacy. Read on to find out more about his first stop: Thermopylae.
I’m writing this from Graviá, a tiny mountain town not far from Thermopylae, the site of the famous battle in 480 BC and the topic of Nic Fields’ great Osprey title Thermopylae 480 BC: Last Stand of the 300 (Campaign 188).

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I also cover Thermopylae as one of four “focus battles” in my forthcoming book The Bronze Lie: Shattering the Myth of Spartan Warrior Supremacy, and I am here on a research trip surveying the battlefields for all four of those battles (the other three being – in date order from the oldest – Pylos/Sphacteria, Leuctra, and Sellasia). I got to use Nic’s book as a guide to surveying the battlefield, and dove a bit deeper on some of his sources as well.
Thermopylae is one of the most famous, popularly dramatized, and politically sensitive battles in ancient history. Much of this is due to the popularity of Frank Miller’s hit 1998 comic book 300 and Zack Snyder’s even more celebrated 2006 film adaptation of it. This battle, more than any other, laid the foundation for the Spartans’ legendary reputation as history’s greatest warriors. It’s a legend I examine in the book and one I’ve already started deconstructing in other short pieces. The popular myth is that Thermopylae was a glorious suicide mission, a fated last stand where 300 brave Spartans sold their lives so dearly and caused so many casualties that the massive Persian juggernaut they opposed was doomed to defeat at the later battles of Salamis (another great Osprey title – Campaign 222:Salamis 480 BC), Plataea (Campaign 239: Plataea 479 BC), and Mycale.
As I’ll argue in The Bronze Lie, I strongly disagree with this. I do not believe Thermopylae was a glorious last stand. It was a paltry three-day delay for the Persians, who went on to burn Athens. They could well absorb the casualties they sustained. The Greeks (the approximately 7,000 Greeks – not a mere 300 Spartans) utterly failed in their strategic objective – to delay the Persian army enough that its enormous size would cause it to starve. The land battle wasn’t even the main Persian objective. The real fight was at sea – off Artemisium – a scrap that Fields does good justice to in his book. The Spartan king Leonidas’ likely apocryphal response of “ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ” (“Come and take them”) to the Persian king Xerxes’ demand that the Spartans surrender their arms is an inspirational cry for the political right around the world (and in particular, pro-gun advocates in the US). It shouldn’t be. Because Xerxes did indeed come and take them, killing every Spartan and Thespian (all the other Greeks had either fled or surrendered) in the process.

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The bronze statue of Leonidas at Thermopylae. Below him reads the ill-considered words in Greek: “Come and take them.”
Herodotus’ narrative of the battle has a Greek traitor named Ephialtes leading the Persians through a secret route (the Anopaia Path) after they fail to defeat the Greeks in the pass via a frontal assault. The problem with this story is it assumes the Persians were idiots who failed to perform critical pre-battle intelligence work. Persia was a vast and incredibly sophisticated empire in 480 BC and they were known for excellent use of intelligence. They were also known for meticulous preparation before invading Greece, including conducting reconnaissance, laying in stores, building roads, establishing lines of communication, and making diplomatic overtures to smooth the way. I cannot bring myself to believe they would have failed to reconnoiter at Thermopylae, and more importantly to have recruited an intelligence network of locals who provided Xerxes with an effective map of the area before battle was even joined. My point is this – Xerxes likely had several local guides in the area before he even showed up. The Anopaia path was no secret. Xerxes knew, and Leonidas knew he knew. Leonidas’ stationing of 1,000 Phocian troops to guard the pass is usually seen as a token force sent because Leonidas didn’t expect the secret to be discovered. I see this force as a legitimate blocking effort (very likely under a Spartan xenagos – a commander of non-Spartan troops) Leonidas was counting on to hold the path against the attack he knew would certainly come. 1,000 men is not paltry when you consider the example set at Marathon in 490 BC, when 10,000-odd Athenians and Plataeans soundly defeated a Persian army at least 2–3 times their number.
Fields uses as his guide to the Anopaia Path a 1980 article by Paul Wallace that originally appeared in the American Journal of Archaeology. I can see why Fields picked it – Wallace hiked the route himself, even going so far as to make the march at the exact same time as the Persians did (and only carrying the same amount of rations), timing where he arrived at each spot and matching that up to Herodotus’ description before settling on what he was certain was the correct route. I was impressed by the article and tried out Wallace’s first part of the path (the only part Wallace really disputes) – starting at the tiny village of Vardates, and on up to the mountain hamlet of Eleftherochori. Verdates is almost impossible to find; I was reduced to driving in the general direction and then using my horrible Greek to ask for directions. I got out of my car, took a picture of the town sign and cheered when I finally figured it out. It does match up to Wallace’s description, as does Eleftherochori, precipitously perched on the mountain at the end of a road with sheer cliff faces (and no guard rail) dropping off to one side. Cutting east from Eleftherochori, I made it some of the way toward Lake Nevropolis, which Wallace’s route suggests, before thick mud, lack of a road, and finally failing light forced me to head back. I’ll come back and try the route again in its entirety, but I do think Fields is on good ground starting with Wallace.


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Vardates was so hard to find that I couldn’t resist taking a triumphal photo of the town sign.



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View from just outside Eleftherochori. The town is perched on a mountain top with steep cliffs (and no guardrail in spots) on the drive up.


While the location of the Anopaia Path is in dispute, the location of the battlefield itself is not, owing largely to one thing – the Kolonos, the small hill where the Spartans and Thespians (and Thebans, but these surrendered before the last stand truly began) retreated and were killed to the last man. We know the Kolonos is the actual location because in 1939 Spyridon Marinatos excavated it, discovering around 100 arrowheads (and some spear heads) that matched known Persian designs (you can see these now in the Athens Archaeological Museum). This exactly matches Herodotus’ description that the defenders were surrounded and slaughtered with a hail of arrows. From the Kolonos, we can figure out the rest of the battlefield with a high degree of accuracy, further proven by the remains of the old Phokian wall (also found by Marinatos) that Herodotus tells us the defenders rebuilt and used.


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The inscription atop the Kolonos hill, written by Simonides: “Go, traveler. Tell the Spartans we lie here, obedient to their laws.”


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The remains of the Phocian wall the Greeks defended.

The hot springs from which the battle takes its name (Thermopylae means “hot gates”) are there, and there’s even a pool you’re welcome to take a dip in if you’re feeling brave (the water is really warm, but it also stinks like rotten eggs from the sulfur content. Some French tourists were swimming in it when I was there, but I declined). The rushing waters are beautiful – steam rises from them, and the rock beneath is bright teal-blue.


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The hot springs from which Thermopylae gets its name. The rocks beneath are a vibrant blue.

Across the road from the Kolonos are the monuments for the battle, which are deeply moving, no matter what you think happened on that day in 480 BC. There’s the 1955 memorial to the 300, with Leonidas front and center – a striking bronze statue above his ... ahem ... rather ill-considered slogan (ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ). I prefer the 1997 memorial to the Thespian dead, despite the modern and extremely phallic sculpture (literally every friend I show it to immediately asks “why did they emphasize the penis?”) This is because while the Spartans get all the credit for Thermopylae, the truth is that their contribution was paltry compared to their available muster. The 700 Thespians who died represented an entire generation of fighting men for the much smaller city.


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The memorial to the Thespian dead at Thermopylae.
I hope you’ve enjoyed these pictures from my tour of the battlefield, and that you’ll check out Nic Fields’ great guide, made even better by Steve Noon’s amazing illustrations. I’ll give my own detailed theory of what happened at Thermopylae when The Bronze Lie comes out.
For now, I have to hit the books – I’ll be heading about an hour southeast tomorrow to Leuctra, where, in 371 BC, Thebes snapped Sparta’s spine, ending Sparta as a militarily relevant power for the remainder of its history.
Follow Myke Cole here:
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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 18 дек 2019, 18:00

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1. Designer Blog: Combat in Oathmark: Battles of the Lost Age - 2019-12-18 10:39:31
Having given us a look at his Oathmark design goals, author Joseph A. McCullough is back on the blog to look at combat in his upcoming mass-battle fantasy wargame.
Once I had my Oathmark ‘Design Goals’ in place, the next question was, ‘Where Do I Start’. Although I’ve written a few games, I knew that Oathmark would be more difficult and complex than anything I had worked on before. Despite this, the actual design process is basically the same for all games: pick one little piece, create that, then pick another and try to get it to fit with the first one. Then repeat, modifying what you’ve done as necessary, until you’ve done all the pieces.
So, to begin, I asked myself a question: ‘What collection of dice would be the most fun to roll during combat?’
Traditionally, mass-battle games have gone with either a ‘bucket of dice’ approach or rolling one die for the unit. Neither of these completely appealed to me. Rolling a bucket of dice can be fun once-in-a-while, but over the course of a game it can quickly become tedious to gather all of the dice, roll them, and then count up all of the results. It tends to slow the game down. That said, I like the idea of rolling only a single die for my unit of 20 dwarves even less. I mean, 20 dwarves deserve more than one die, don’t they?

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I decided that the best answer lay somewhere between – a small handful. I eventually settled on 5. It’s enough dice to feel like you are making a serious attack, but not so many that you can’t roll them with one hand. It also fit neatly with the growing idea that most units in the game would be arranged into ranks of five figures.
You won’t always roll five dice during a combat, but you will in most of them!

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Artwork by Jan Pospíšil
Of course, once I knew how many dice, I had to decide which type. Players who know me from Frostgrave will probably be surprised to hear that I haven’t used d20s. No, reading 5d20, especially if there are modifiers, is a big ask for your brain. Conversely, I didn’t want d6 because I wanted more potential outcomes. So, I settled on d10. This die has a lot of advantages. Not only does it have more potential outcomes than a d6, but the probability of those outcomes is more intuitive. Added to this, most people are trained from birth to think of math in terms of the number 10 (Base 10 and all that), and thus maths in and around that number is generally pretty easy.
So 5d10. That is what you are going to need to play Oathmark. In fact, those are the only dice you will need. That said, one of those 5 should be a different colour than the rest. That’s your ‘Champion Die’, but we will get into that another day…
Previous: Oathmark Design Goals
Next: Building Kingdoms in Oathmark (coming soon!)


2. Designer Blog: Design Goals for Oathmark: Battles of the Lost Age - 2019-12-18 10:01:53
Coming in April 2020, Oathmark: Battles of the Lost Age is a mass-battle fantasy wargame designed by Joseph A. McCullough, creator of Frostgrave and Frostgrave: Ghost Archipelago. Over the coming months, Joseph will be giving us a look at the design process behind the game.

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To start off this Oathmark blog series let's go back to over two years ago, when I first sat down with Phil Smith, Head of Osprey Games, to discuss the project from top-to-bottom. Together, we sketched out what we wanted Oathmark to be. Later, I translated that sketch into a list of design goals which I’m going to share with you today as a starting point for exploring the various facets of the game. So, here’s the list.
• Rules that focused on moving large units around on the table, but where one figure equals one man (orc, elf, dwarf, whatever) and featuring individual casualty removal.
• A combat system that featured fast, bloody results.
• A game that focused more on tactical play than special rules, power units, or ‘combinations’.
• The inclusion of a true campaign system that added a sense of narrative flair to the games.
• An opened-ended army construction system that allowed players to freely mix races and that also integrated with the campaign system.
• A classic fantasy feeling without binding players to a fixed, heavily-defined fantasy world.
That is where it all began! Sounds simple, right? Well, two years later, and we are just hammering out the last details!
Over the coming weeks and months, I’ll be back to discuss each of the above points in more detail, and give you guys some more insights into the game and the design process that went into it, starting with a look at combat in Oathmark. Next: Combat in Oathmark


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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 19 дек 2019, 18:00

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1. Sellasia with Myke Cole (#3) - 2019-12-18 17:05:00
Osprey author, Myke Cole is on a research trip around Greece ahead of his upcoming book The Bronze Lie: Shattering the Myth of Spartan Warrior Supremacy. Read on to find out more about his next stop: Sellasia.
I’m writing this from my room in Kokkinórrakhi, in the heights just northeast of Sparta. The Taygetus range, which separates Sparta from its former subordinate neighbor Messenia, rises like a snow-capped wall in the distance.
I spent the day just northwest of the tiny mountain town of Sellasia (do not try to drive there. The winding, narrow streets abut sheer cliffs and are barely wide enough for one car – and traffic flows both ways!). I visited this site because it’s where the Battle of Sellasia (actually the 2nd Battle of Sellasia) was fought in 222 BC. In this battle, the Antigonid (most people call them ‘the Macedonians’) king Antigonus III Doson defeated the Spartan king Cleomenes III, ending the reformist Spartan’s brief revival of Spartan power and permanently consigning Sparta to the dustbin of history. The battle is significant not just because it doomed Sparta’s bid to come back from the dead after its decisive defeat at Leuctra just shy of 150 years earlier, but also because it’s a great example of Spartans fighting not as hoplites, but as Hellenistic pezhetairoi (foot companions), armed with the 21-inch sarissa pike held in two hands. I discuss Hellenistic phalanxes in great detail in my Osprey book Legion Versus Phalanx. There’s no Osprey Campaign series book for Sellasia, and I have made a mental note to tackle this as well, once my desk is clear.
For the site of Sellasia, I started with J. D. Morgan’s article ‘Sellasia Revisited’ in The American Journal of Archaeology, vol. 85, no.3 (1981). Morgan himself is working off descriptions of the battle in Polybius, and also in Plutarch’s Vita Cleomenes and Vita Philopoemen. Here’s the gist of the battle (there’s a lot more detail, which I give in my forthcoming book, The Bronze Lie): Cleomenes occupied ‘Mount Olympos’ with the Spartan right (leading the noble Spartan Peers – Spartiatai). The Spartan left occupied ‘Mount Euas’ under the command of Cleomenes’ brother Eucleidas with the Spartan Perioeci (the ‘dwellers around,’ a kind of free, but second-class subject of Sparta). The Spartan center, consisting of light infantry and cavalry, occupied the center. Opposite Cleomenes was Antigonus in command of the Antigonid Leukaspides (White Shields). Opposite Eucleidas was the Antigonid right, consisting largely of the Antigonid Chalkaspides (Bronze Shields) and also Illyrian mountaineers and Acarnanian allied troops. The Antigonid center consisted of Greek allies, including the famous Philopoemen. We’re not going to worry about the center for the topographical discussion that follows.



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“Mount Olympos” where King Cleomenes III was posted with the Spartan right.

Morgan positions Eucleidas and the Spartan left on the modern double-humped peak of Tourles. This is ‘Mount Euas.’ He puts Cleomenes and the Spartan right on a flat saddle on the modern peak of Melissi. The problem with this position is that it leaves the road through the pass wide open, going around the east of Cleomenes’ supposed position. The Spartans were seeking to block the Antigonid approach through the pass (and on to Sparta). They wouldn’t leave the pass open. Once again, I consulted my friend and mentor Michael Livingston. He agreed with Morgan’s positioning of Eucleidas and the Spartan left, but he moved Cleomenes and the Spartan right to another hill further south that would enable the Spartan center to block the pass.

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Modern Tourles was likely “Mount Euas” where Eucleidas was stationed with the Spartan left.

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This ordinary looking road heads through the pass north of Sellasia, which means the Spartans would have sought to block it. The Spartan center would have been posted around here.


Is our resulting theory of the Spartan position correct? Walking the battlefield makes me think it is: Plutarch tells us that Eucleidas was flanked by the Illyrian and Acarnanian troops via a ‘secret way’ and destroyed. He also notes that Cleomenes saw this occurring and that Spartan morale cracked at this point in the battle. Plutarch further tells us that Cleomenes drove the Antigonids back for five furlongs (a little over half a mile) before he saw his brother’s position was hopeless. For Cleomenes to see his brother’s position, he would have to have descended from the heights down into the valley, and so would Eucleidas. I confirmed from walking the battlefield that I could see west from Cleomenes’ position in the valley, but only if the existing olive groves that grow there now were gone. It is impossible to know what grew in that valley in 222 BC, but if the ground was relatively barren, then the view west would have been clear, and we can be reasonably sure of our new position for ‘Mount Olympos.’


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Plutarch tells us Cleomenes pushed the Antigonids back 5 furlongs, likely through this valley.


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The valley north of Tourles, thickly grown with olive trees now, where the Spartan left was flanked and destroyed.

Tomorrow, I take my ‘day off,’ touring Sparta instead of mapping battlefields. Then, I’ll head on to the final battle of this trip – Pylos and Sphacteria on the southwest coast of the Peloponnese.
Follow Myke Cole here:
www.mykecole.com
www.facebook.com/mykecole
www.twitter.com/MykeCole
If you're following along with Myke, catch up on his last blog posts here:
Entry #1: Visiting Thermopylae with Myke Cole (#1)
Entry #2: Leuctra with Myke Cole (#2)


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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 20 дек 2019, 18:00

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1. A Century of Duel Titles - 2019-12-20 10:23:00
With the publication of Duel 100: Me 262 vs P-51 Mustang coming up, we asked Tony Holmes, Duel Series Editor for aviation, to reflect on this fantastic milestone.



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It is appropriate that the 100 titles published in the Osprey Duel series to date are bookended by titles that have one thing in common – the P-51 Mustang. Duel 1, published in September 2007, saw North American Aviation’s thoroughbred fighter pitched in aerial combat with the Fw 190 in the skies over western Europe during 1944-45. Although variants of Focke-Wulf’s deadly ‘butcher bird’ have since featured in three Duels, the Mustang has had to wait until volume 100, published this month, to appear in print once more.


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During the intervening 12 years, all manner of aircraft types have been given the Duel treatment by Osprey’s talented cohort of authors and artists. From the decidedly subsonic Zeppelin and BE 2c that fought it out in the night skies over London, to the blisteringly quick MiG-25 ‘Foxbat’ and F-15 Eagle engaging each other in fleeting combat over the western Iraqi desert, the full gamut of military aviation has appeared in print in the Duel series.
Although I have been fortunate enough to have devised two previous series for Osprey that have also passed the 100-mark (Aircraft of the Aces and Combat Aircraft), when I was asked by the company in 2004 to create another series of books for the aviation list, it took me a little while to come up with a concept that did not repeat what had already been covered by the publisher. My initial proposal was for a series called Dogfight, and this would have exclusively dealt with aircraft only. As much as Osprey liked this concept, the company (and specifically my editorial publisher at the time, Kate Moore) felt that it could be broadened to encompass military and nautical subject matter too, and so the series title Duel was born. The rest, as they say, is history.
All 48 of the aviation titles published to date have rigidly stuck to the same formula first seen in Duel 1 – engaging text laced with first-hand accounts, stunning battlescenes and cover art, accurate technical artwork and quality photography. The authors that have contributed to the aviation titles within the Duel list can attest to the fact that writing a book in this series requires great discipline due to the exacting nature of its content. Compiling references for three dynamic artworks, two cockpits, armament cutaway views and three-views can also be challenging, but Osprey authors are a multi-talented bunch who clearly relish such work as none of them to date have stuck to writing just one title in the series.

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Battlescene taken from Duel 91: Hellcat vs Shiden/Shiden-Kai. Artwork by Gareth Hector.

The consistent high quality of the artwork that has graced the covers and pages of the Duel aviation titles since 2007 has been a trademark of the series. The bulk of this work has been created by just two highly talented artists – Jim Laurier, based in New England, and Scotsman Gareth Hector. Their attention to detail is truly breathtaking, and it is always a personal highlight for me when the artwork files for a new title arrive from them. Jim and Gareth do not work in splendid isolation, however. Their creations reflect the quality references supplied to them by the numerous authors whose work make up the Duel series.

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The Mirage IIICJ’s cockpit view taken from Duel 28: Mirage III vs MiG-21. Artwork by Jim Laurier.



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A6M2/3 Zero-sen model 21 armament view taken from Duel 93: Spitfire VC vs A6M2/3 Zero-sen. Artwork by Jim Laurier

I look forward to commissioning and working on the next 50+ aviation Duel titles as the series strives for a double century. Future subjects for coverage include Spitfires and Fw 190s fighting for supremacy on the Channel front from Dieppe to D-Day, SBD Dauntlesses clashing with Zero-sens in the pivotal Pacific battles of 1942-43, and the fearsome Ju 87G-1 ‘Kanonenvogel’ tackling hordes of T-34s on the Eastern Front.


2. 5 New Creatures coming in Ragnarok: The Vanir - 2019-12-20 08:23:00
Ragnarok: The Vanir publishes on 26th December, and brings a host of new content to the skirmish game of heavy metal combat in the Viking age. Amongst the new content are a vast array of creatures for the Bestiary, some of which you can find below!
The featured artwork is all by RU-MOR, with descriptions from author Tim Korklewski. Akhlut

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The Akhlut is a vicious bease from Skraeling folk tales. They were used to warn fishemen not to be too bold in their hunts near the icy waters. Akhluts are a hybrid of dire wolves and orcas, taking the predatory traits of both creatures to create a species of predator born from the nightmares of thoes that have spun legends into realty. Luckily for those that do wander, the Akhlut is a solitary hunter. However, it is just as dangerous to its prey on land as it is to those foolish enough to enter the waters where they dwell. Wendigo

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A creature that strikes fear in any demimortal at the mere mention of its name, the Wendigo is a remorseless killer that stops at nothing to slaughter its way through the Fractured Realms. Wendigo are a tall, gaunt race of demons that constantly look as if they are starving and dying of hunger. Sores cover their leathery skin, causing a smell of sickness and decay to fill the air in their presence. Its hands end in vicious claws which are used for rending their victims with ease. While it has the body of a humanoid, its head is that of a dead dear with predatory teeth. Kigatilik

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The Kigatilik, also known as "The Claw People", are a horrifying demonic race of creatures that are known for killing shamans, Gothi, and magic users of all kinds. It is said that they feed off of the magics that ebb and flow within the blood of their victims. Kigatilik, with their pale grey skin and bulbous eyes, stand roughly the height of an average mortal. They are typically slender in build and each of their hands end in massive claws the size of small swords. The mere touch of a Kigatilik is said to drain the ability to use mystical effects from their victims. Qalupalik

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The Qalupalik are a demimortal race of cannibals that live deep beneath the frozen waters of The Fractured Realms. Their hideous forms can be seen darting beneath the ice, waiting on the perfect opportunity to pounce upon their prey. Qalupalik are a hideous species with green skin, large fish-like eyes, over-sized mouths filled with razor teeth, and with long, webbed fingers ending in horrid talons. Their favored tactic is to surprise their victims and drag them into the frigid water. Once there, they place them in a satchel to hold them close until the victim is no longer breathing. Tupilaq

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The Tupilaq is a demonic entitiy that was initially created to hunt down a specific enemy. When The Shattering happened, the sorcery used to bind the spirit to the inanimate objects that made up the body of a Tupilaq leaked out into the Worlds, allowing these errant spirits to create their own forms from stone, wood, dead flesh, bone, and any other available material. While the bodies of each Tupilaq are vastly different, their gruesome methods are always the same: hunt down their targets and kill them publicly, brutally, and instill fear in any witnesses.
Want to face off against these monsters? Preorder your copy of Ragnarok: The Vanir today!


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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 21 дек 2019, 18:00

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1. Osprey Year in Review: January - April 2019 - 2019-12-21 10:05:00
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2019 has been a busy, but great year. To mark such a fantastic year, we’re going to take a look back at some of our highlights, from book votes and artwork to published reviews. For the first of this three-part series, let’s cast our minds back to the beginning of the year and look at some of our favourite moments from January to April.
Highlights


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What people said about our books
Hitler’s Death:
“An incisive new book by Luke Daly-Groves has come to the aid of those determined to tell the truth with a brilliant demolition of the conspiracists.” ― The Mail on Sunday
Day of the Rangers:
"This book about the Battle of Mogadishu is a must-read, simple as that."― Soldier Magazine
How to Survive in the Georgian Navy:
“Packed with great facts and a multitude of figures this is a very engaging little book and wherever you dip into, you will find it very hard to put it down.” ― Model Boats
Cold War Fleet:
"All I’ve got is huge praise for this. The quality is exceptional, it is a fabulous title, and if you are remotely interested in the Royal Navy, in naval vessels, or in the Cold War, this has got a huge amount to offer and is highly recommended." ― Geoff Coughlin, Scale Modelling Now


Awe-inspiring Artwork
It's so hard every month to pick out just three pieces of artwork from all of those publishing, so picking out the best of them was a real challenge - but we've had a go nonetheless. Which is your favourite?

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Weapon 66: Weapons of the Viking Warrior by Gareth Williams
Illustrated by Johnny Schumate
Here, two opposing shield-walls approach each other to fight in close order. Within this formation, the spear is the principal weapon. On the left of the scene, archers seek to disrupt the opposing shield-wall by loosing arrows into the enemy’s midst. On the right, a small number of mounted warriors are moving to turn the flank of the opposing shield-wall, again with the hope of causing the formation to collapse.

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Air Campaign 9: Japan 1944–45 by Mark Lardas
Illustrated by Mark Postlethwaite
This illustration depicts a night raid over Akashi shortly after midnight on July 7, 1945. Between 12.15am and 1.27am the raiders dropped 975.9 tons of M-69 incendiaries from altitudes ranging from 6,900 to 8,200ft. The raid devastated Akashi. By sunrise, nearly 60 percent of the city was in ashes.


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Combat 39: Russian Soldier vs Japanese Soldier by David Campbell
Illustrated by Steve Noon

The plate here is titled ‘Fighting to the death on 203 Metre Hill, 30 November 1904’, and depicts the Japanese’s concerted attacks at 203 Metre Hill in an attempt to target the remaining Russian ships at Port Arthur.


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New Vanguard 269: European Ironclads 1860–75 by Angus Konstam
Illustrated by Paul Wright
Another fascinating plate illustrates the Rolf Krake of the Danish navy in action near Dybbøl, 18 February 1864. When the Prussians built a pontoon bridge between Alnor and Egersund to improve their lines of communication, Captain Rothe commanding the Rolf Krake was ordered to sortie from nearby Sønderborg and destroy the bridge. Owing to the shallow water of the Flensburg fjord the Rolf Krake was unable to approach her objective. Instead at 9.30am she was drawn into a duel with an emplaced battery of Prussian 12-pounders at Alnor.

Best of the Blog
Right at the start of the year, we had a look at the trailers for war films coming out this year. How many of them did you see, and what did you think of them?
Film 2019
Our authors not only produce fascinating books for us; they also pull out the stops to create fantastic blog posts. Here are a few you may have missed at the start of this year.
Kulikovo, 1380: A Battle Almost Lost in Myth by Mark Galeotti
The Aerial Dimension of Operation Catapult by Ryan K. Noppen
A “Wild Bill” for a Wild Theater: The Aleutians 1942-43 by Brian Lane Herder


Book Vote Winners
January: New Vanguard
We started this year’s voting with a New Vanguard vote, which had a stand-out winner. Polish Warships 1939-45 claimed victory with 56% of the vote, beating Warships of the Republic of Venice, which had 20%, by a large margin.
February: Weapon
February again saw a clear winner, this time in a Weapon vote. Weapons of the Medieval Knight raced to victory with 31% of the final vote, beating Sniping Rifles of World War I, which achieved 23%.
March: Air Campaign
March's Air Campaign vote was much closer than the previous two, with Syria 2015-2018 winning out with 26% of the vote, a close victory over Channel Front 1941, which had 23%.
April: Duel
April's vote battle of the Duels saw Bf 109 vs I-16: Spain 1937-39 taking 30% of the votes followed by UH-1 Huey Gunship vs NVA/Viet Cong: 1965-73 with 24%.


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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 22 дек 2019, 18:00

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1. The Persian War #2 - 2019-12-22 12:30:00
In his second blog, William Shepherd gives a flavour of the ‘ancient voices’ he built his new book, The Persian War in Herodotus and Other Ancient Voices, around.


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Far more Greeks heard Herodotus’ Historia performed by him in his time than read it from a manuscript. This is how he started his performance, probably quite often to a paying audience:
Herodotus of Halicarnassus presents this Historia to ensure that the events of mankind should not fade in memory over time and that the great and marvellous deeds performed by Hellenes and Barbarians alike should not go unsung, and, additionally, to explain the cause of the war that they fought against each other. (1.1)

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Marathon in 490 was the first clash of Greeks and Barbarians on the mainland of Greece. For the Athenians it was immensely important as a matter of identity and pride. The Persians on the other hand could shrug it off as a minor setback at the end of a successful probe across the Aegean, a temporary delay of the Great King Darius’ plan to extend his empire into Europe and from there to the setting sun.
Herodotus’ account of the battle, just a few hundred words, is the fullest we have. This is his description of its turning point:
The fighting went on for a long time at Marathon. The Barbarians were winning in the centre where the Sacae and the Persians themselves were positioned. They were winning here and broke the Greek centre and drove it inland. But on each flank the Athenians and the Plataeans were winning. They let the routed Barbarians run and wheeled each wing inwards to attack those who had broken through in the centre, and then the Athenians were victorious. The Persians turned and ran, and the Athenians came after them, cutting them down until they reached the shore. (6.113)

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Later sources wrote about this battle with rather more excitement and invention. Justin here lavishly embroiders the story of the tragedian Aeschylus’ brother losing a hand and his life in the fight around the Persian ships.
After killing a great many in the battle and chasing the fleeing enemy to their ships, Cynegirus seized a fully manned trireme with his right hand and would not let it go till he had lost that hand. Even then, with his right hand cut off, he held onto the ship with his left. When he lost this as well, he finally hung onto the ship with his teeth. He had such fighting spirit that, unwearied by so much killing or by the loss of both his hands, but defeated and dismembered, he fought on with his teeth to the last like a wild beast. (Justin Epitome of Trogus’ Philippic Histories 2.9)
Surely the inspiration for the Black Knight in Monty Python and the Holy Grail!
Robert Browning became even more excited:
Run, Pheidippides, one race more! the meed is thy due!
‘Athens is saved, thank Pan,’ go shout!” He flung down his shield,
Ran like fire once more: and the space ’twixt the Fennel-field
And Athens was stubble again, a field which a fire runs through,
Till in he broke: “Rejoice, we conquer!” Like wine thro’ clay,
Joy in his blood bursting his heart, he died — the bliss!

The Great King Xerxes inherited this unfinished business and led the Persians back into Greece in 480. Thermopylae was the land segment of the Greeks’ first line of defence; the simultaneous sea battle of Artemisium off the north coast of Euboea was far bigger and much more significant. Thermopylae is on a par with Marathon as the best-known of the six battles of this war and for the mythology that grew rapidly around it, and it’s almost as much written about; but, like Marathon, it is actually less important than the sea battles of Artemisium and Salamis, and the decisive land battle of Plataea.
We rejoin Herodotus at Thermopylae on the third and final day when the 300 Spartans (and several hundred other Greeks who tend to be overlooked) fight their doomed rearguard action to cover the retreat of the rest of Leonidas’ blocking force.
The Hellenes fought with all their strength and with reckless fury, knowing very well that death was closing in on them, brought by the force that had come over the mountain. By this stage in the battle most of their spears were broken and they were killing the Persians with their swords. And, in the thick of this, Leonidas fell, his excellence proved, and with him fell many other famous Spartans… There was a mighty struggle between the Persians and the Lacedaemonians over Leonidas’ body, and the Hellenes finally dragged it away after four times heroically driving the enemy back. (7.24)
This is the stuff of Homer, and the Greeks were still spiritually quite in touch with the warrior heroes of the Iliad. Many reflecting on Leonidas’ sacrifice would have been reminded of Achilles’ death and of the way he faced it, and even known these words:
My doom I will accept whatever time it is the will of Zeus
Or other immortal gods to bring it on.
Not even mighty Heracles escaped his doom.
Most dear he was to Zeus, Cronos’ son, the king,
But fate and Hera’s fierce anger broke him.
And so, I too will lay me down to sleep in death
If a like fate is wrought for me.
But for now, let me win high renown …
For all your love for me, do not try to hold me back from battle
Or change my mind.
(Iliad 18.115–121, 126)
Later in the year the two sides met again, further south and on the sea at Salamis and Aeschylus was there, though on his death he wished only to be remembered for fighting at Marathon (and not for his supreme tragedies either). His Persae is the nearest thing we have to a first-hand eye-witness account of the Persian War. This is a Persian messenger speaking:
As soon as the white colts of daybreak,
Brilliant to behold, covered the earth,
A cry rang out from the Hellene ranks
Like a triumph song, and a high echo
Bounced back from the island rocks.
Terror gripped the Barbarians,
Terror and shattered hopes. This was not flight!
The Hellenes were singing their sacred paean
And surging into battle with spirits high.
A trumpet call set them all afire.
Straightway, on the command, they dipped their oars,
All striking the ocean brine together.
Swiftly the whole fleet came into view,
The right wing leading in perfect order
And then the whole host coming out against us.
And we could hear a great shout,
‘Sons of Hellas, forward to freedom!
Freedom for the land of your fathers!
Freedom for your children and wives!
Freedom for the shrines of your ancestral gods,
For the tombs of your forefathers!
Now all is at stake!’ …
At first the great stream of Persian ships held its own,
But, when the mass of them crowded into the narrows,
Far from giving support, they crashed into each other
With their bronze-beaked prows shattering all their rowing gear.
The Hellenes systematically worked their way around them
And struck from all directions.
(386–405, 412–417)


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Writing towards the end of the century, when Athens was out for the count in the Peloponnesian War, Timotheus wrote an elaborate ode, also called the Persae. It was chanted over a strummed lyre and full of extravagant metaphors and purple vocabulary. But we are right there, on the straits of Salamis, pulling away at our oars and unable to see anything much of what is going on, least of all in front of our trireme, and we are rammed …
Spray flying from the oars,
The fleets sweep together
Ploughing through the swell
Ram teeth bared.
They close, and curving prows
Rip through the fir-tree limbs.
A strike on one side shatters oars
And throws the rowers all one way.
Then, on the other side, a second strike
Smashes more banks of oars and seafaring pine
And hurls the rowers back again.
(1-11)
Back to Aeschylus:
Capsized hulls covered the open water
Clogging it with wreckage and the dead.
The shores and reefs were draped with corpses.
Every ship was flying in chaos,
Every ship, that is, in the Barbarian fleet.
The Hellenes, like fishermen netting tuna or some other haul of fish,
Battered and skewered with broken timbers and splintered oars,
And screams and groans filled the salty air
Until black-eyed night brought the horror to an end.
(418–428)
Xerxes sailed home with his fleet, never to return, but a very large army stayed behind under the command of a royal prince, Mardonius. Aeschylus sets the scene and points the moral in a prophecy delivered by the ghost of Darius.
… Vain hope drove Xerxes
To leave those chosen troops behind.
Utter disaster lies in wait for them,
Payment of the price of their impious acts and godless thoughts.
For, when they reached the land of Hellas,
Without shame they ravaged sacred images and set temples ablaze.
Altars were smashed, holy shrines ripped from their foundations
And tumbled into shambles of shattered stone.
Such evil have they done, so great will be their suffering.
And more will follow; their river of pain is not dry, still it gushes.
The Dorian spear will make Plataea’s soil a bloody swamp
And heaped up-corpses will send to mortal men,
Even the next three generations, this unvoiced message:
You are mortal, do not think over-mighty thoughts.
For, when hubris has blossomed and ripened on the bough,
It yields a bitter harvest of delusion.
(800–822)
We jump with Herodotus to the final day and climax of the twelve-day battle of Plataea fought in Boeotia, ‘the dancing floor of Ares’. Around 200,000 men were involved in this battle for the future of western civilization, about the same number as at Waterloo, alive and dead after Blücher had arrived, and rather more than fought at Gettysburg or were shipped over the Channel on D-Day.

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The dancing floor of Ares’

The Persians set aside their bows and faced up to the Hellenes, and at first the fighting was along the wall of shields but, when that went down, there was a hard struggle around the sanctuary of Demeter. It went on for a long time because the Barbarians kept seizing the Hellenes’ spears and breaking them. The Persians were not inferior in courage or physical strength, but they were not armed like hoplites or trained in their way of fighting, and they did not have the tactical skill of their opponents.…
Wherever Mardonius was fighting, mounted on his white charger with his picked band of a thousand, the flower of the Persians, there they pressed the enemy hardest. And while Mardonius still lived, they held their own and, fighting back, struck down many Lacedaemonians. But when Mardonius had fallen and when the men around him, the best in his army, had been slain, then the rest were put to flight and gave way before the Lacedaemonians. Their greatest disadvantage was the lack of armour in their equipment. They were, in effect, naked men battling with hoplites….
And on that day, in accordance with the oracle, due compensation was fully paid by Mardonius to the Spartans for the killing of Leonidas, and the most glorious victory ever known was secured by Pausanias, son of Cleombrotus, son of Anaxandridas.
(9.62,64)

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Order your copy of The Persian War in Herodotus and Other Ancient Voices here.


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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 23 дек 2019, 18:00

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1. Sneak Peek at March's Artwork - 2019-12-23 11:59:00
On today's blog post, we're looking at three fantastic pieces of artwork from a few of our March 2020 titles. Let us know what you think in the comments section. If there are any April titles you would like to see artwork from, be sure to mention that too!

Raid 52: Operation Eagle Claw 1980 by Justin Williamson
Artwork by Jim Laurier and Johnny Shumate


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The first piece of artwork, requested by GI Gene, depicts the disaster at Desert One during Operation Eagle Claw. In this illustration, Delta and the Rangers react to the collision between Bluebeard 3 smashes and Republic 4. Delta are wearing blue jeans, black field jackets, black knit caps, and carrying CAR-15s. They are wearing standard US Army LBE and are sporting covered-up American flags on their field jackets. Delta, to blend in easier with the civilian population, have longer hair and some have beards. The Rangers are wearing the standard US Army uniform and carrying CAR-15s. Visible in the background is part of the road watch team, equipped with a M151 MUTT jeep and motorcycle.
Combat 47: French Soldier vs German Soldier by David Campbell
Artwork by Adam Hook

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This next image, requested by KAL9000, shows a flamethrower assault at Mort-Homme from the German point of view. The assault is initiated by the Pioniere team carrying a Kleif M1915 flamethrower, the Strahlrohrführer (‘lance operator’) launching a thick jet of fire out towards the Frenchmen, engulfing a section of the trench in broad splashes of flame and billowing black smoke. At the same time scattered groups of supporting assault troops open fire with their rifles and hurl showers of Stielhandgranaten to suppress any defenders who have not been consumed by the initial inferno. Once the resistance falters, the assault troops, supported by the oncoming waves of infantry, will attack in a Schwarmlinie (‘swarm line’) and seize the position.
Campaign 347: Constantinople AD 717–18 by Si Sheppard
Artwork by Graham Turner

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This final piece of artwork depicts the events on 3 September 717, when the Umayyad fleet entered the Bosporus, dividing into its constituent squadrons to seek anchorage at the European and Asian suburbs of Constantinople. As the enemy vessels drifted towards the city, Emperor Leo III played his trump card and unleashed his dromons, small, fast, and manoeuverable vessels. In addition to their speed, the dromons were armed with the definitive Byzantine terror weapon, Greek Fire. When an enemy vessel came within range, the gunner opened a valve that released the liquid. The Arab ships were immolated, along with their crews.


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1. Desperate Sunset - 2019-12-26 10:50:00
By the middle of 1944, in a last desperate bid to stave off defeat, Japan’s High Command launched the terrifying kamikaze attacks. These attacks are the subject of Mike Yeo's new book Desperate Sunset. Read on to find out more.


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The fanaticism of the Japanese military during the war in the Pacific is well known by anyone with even a passing interest in the genre, and if anything, this fanaticism only grew as Imperial Japan was forced back on all fronts in 1944.
Despite this reputation, the use of tokko (“special attack”) tactics soon after American forces invaded the Philippines in October 1944 was still a nasty surprise. Unbeknownst to the US, Imperial Japan had started formulating plans for its pilots and aircraft to fly one-way missions and deliberately crash bomb-laden aircraft onto enemy ships as early as the middle of 1944, and in mid-October had started organizing dedicated units for such a purpose.
The driving force for these tactics, in addition to the increasingly terrible military situation the Japanese found themselves in, was the sharp decline in pilot quality. Even by 1943, the ranks of Imperial Japan’s painstakingly trained pilots had been ground down by the war of attrition in the Solomons and New Guinea, and the training pipeline could not replace them either in terms of quantity or of quality.
The first successes of the tokko – more popularly known as the kamikaze (Divine Wind, named after the typhoons that destroyed separate Mongol invasion fleets bound for Japan in the 13th century) – came on October 25 in the immediate aftermath of the Battle of Leyte Gulf and about five days after the first missions were flown.
That morning, an American escort carrier (USS St Lo) was sunk and several others damaged, and this heralded a whole new way of war for the Japanese. From that day until the attacks ended with the final Japanese surrender in August 1945, Japan launched hundreds of tokko attacks, sinking and damaging some 300 Allied ships and killing thousands of Allied seamen.

The book
This is not the first English-language book detailing the Japanese tokko campaign against Allied ships in the last ten months on the war. However, the key difference is that Desperate Sunset looks at both Allied and Japanese sources in an attempt to get a fuller account of the campaign.
In addition to using the war diaries, action reports and anti-aircraft reports of US Navy ships attacked by the “Special Attackers,” as well as the after-action reports of the Allied pilots who defended their ships, we will also look at published Japanese lists of Tokubetsu Kogekitai (Special Attack Units), the aircraft they used, and rosters of pilots who were sent on these one-way missions off the Philippines, Formosa, Okinawa and Japan.
The book will also look into some of the lesser-known tokko attacks of the war, such as the attack on the Allied invasion fleet off Balikpapan in the Dutch East Indies on June 25, 1945, as well as the sinking of the British minesweeper HMS Vestal off Phuket in Siam (Thailand) one month later by a Malaya-based tokko unit.
Most importantly, this book cross-references Japanese data with Allied reports in an attempt to shed more light on tokko attacks and reconcile them with Allied reports. During the course of researching the material for the book, it was found that the attackers were wrongly identified by eyewitnesses in many cases. This is understandable, given that identifying aircraft in the heat of battle, especially when confronted with types seldom encountered by Allied seamen, was challenging at best) With the Japanese sources on hand, an attempt can be made to try to correct the record, as can be seen in this excerpt from the book about the attack on the destroyer-escort USS LeRay Wilson off the Philippines on January 10, 1945.
“…the destroyer-escort USS LeRay Wilson (DE-414) was on anti-submarine patrol off the western entrance of the Lingayen Gulf when its crew spotted a twin-engined bomber emerging out of the gloom of the western sky. The ship had little time to react, for the bomber was first observed just 1,000 yards off its port bow, approaching from almost dead ahead and flying just above the surface of the sea. Identified as a ‘Betty,’ this was most likely the modified To-Go ‘Peggy’ bomber flown by Captain Kunio Soga of the Fugaku-tai that taken off from Clark Field at 0400hrs.
“To its crews’ credit, the LeRay Wilson responded admirably to the threat, despite its close proximity. Quickly engaging the bomber with antiaircraft fire, they scored several hits and set its port wing aflame, causing the pilot to veer off his intended flightpath. The last detail was crucial for securing the survival of the 1,350-ton warship, for it would have been unlikely to have survived a direct hit from the explosive-packed ‘Peggy.’ Instead, the bomber’s wing clipped the two 20mm mounts on the portside amidships and plunged into the sea beyond. The broken wing released burning fuel onto the exposed surfaces of the ship and started a fire that took several hours to contain, although the vessel was never in any danger of sinking and was underway again by 1000hrs. Eight crewmen were killed and three others lost at sea, with two more wounded.”
It is hoped that Desperate Sunset will invite a fresh look at this aspect of the Pacific campaign, and continue the increasing recent trend of using published Japanese data and available archives to try and paint a fuller, more accurate, picture of the war in the Pacific by reconciling that with available information from the Allied side.

Desperate Sunset publishes today. Get your copy from the website here.


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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 28 дек 2019, 18:09

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1. Osprey Year in Review: May- August 2019 - 2019-12-28 11:05:00
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Highlights


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What people said about our books
Scapa 1919
“Extremely authoritative, very well referenced throughout – this really is a seminal text on the subject, and I would heartily recommend it.”― Scale Modelling Now
Wade McClusky and the Battle of Midway
“A thoroughly good read.” ― Aeroplane Monthly
Warship 2019
"Detailed and accurate information is the keynote of all the articles, which are fully supported by plans, data tables and stunning photographs." ― Scale Modelling Now
Combat 40: Macedonian Phalangite vs Persian Warrior
"An inspiring account, well-written, and with clear battlefield maps and descriptions." ― Miniature Wargames


Awe-inspiring Artwork
It's so hard every month to pick out just three pieces of artwork from all of those publishing, so picking out the best of them was a real challenge - but we've had a go nonetheless. Which is your favourite?

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Campaign 336: Strasbourg AD 357 by Raffaele D'Amato and Andrea Frediani
Illustrated by Florent Vincent
Here, the surrender of Chnodomar is depicted.The defeated Alemannic king, accompanied by 200 of his men, had attempted to escape following the battle, but was cut off and surrounded by the Romans. He surrendered of his own accord.


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Combat 42: British Airborne Soldier versus Waffen-SS Soldier by David Greentree
Artwork by Peter Dennis
The plate here shows the fight for the Koude Herberg road junction, 20 September 1944, where two platoons from C Coy, 1 Border engaged advancing German forces, knocking out two PzKpfw B2(f) tanks and breaking up the German infantry attack.

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Duel 94: Walker Bulldog vs T-54 by Chris McNab
Illustrated by Johnny Shumate
This piece of artwork shows the engagement around FSB 31 on February 27, 1971, with ARVN M41A3 tanks from the 17th ACS engaging T-54 tanks of the PAVN. The commander of the ARVN unit, Lieutenant Colonel Xuan Dung, ordered his gunner to engage the lead PAVN tank. The very first shot smashed through the lower armor of an enemy T-54, causing the tank to explode with such ferocity that it flipped over onto its back, with the remaining targets destroyed in the ensuing exchange of fire.


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New Vanguard 272: Churchill Infantry Tank by David Fletcher
Illustrated by Henry Morshead
This picture shows a Churchill VI, which is essentially a Mark IV fitted with the 75mm Mark V gun. The tank is transporting infantrymen and crossing a Churchill tank bridge without room to spare at the side, presumably being guided by a dismounted member of the crew.

Best of the Blog
Commemorating the 75th anniversary of the famous D-Day landings, we posted a series of extracts from Steven Zaloga’s Atlas of the European Campaigns 1944-45 looking at the key assaults that occurred that day :
D-Day Assaults
As usual, our authors have produced some fantastic content throughout the summer months. Here are a few of our top picks:
The First Anglo-Sikh War 1845–46 by David Smith
The Castagnaro Riddle by Kelly DeVries, Niccolò Capponi
Wade McClusky and the Battle of Midway by David Rigby


Book Vote Winners
May: Men-at-Arms
May's Men-at-Arms book vote was a close one with The French Army of Africa 1872–1914 taking the lead with 27%, beating The Indo-Pakistani Wars 1947–99 by just 2%.
June: Weapon
There was a competition between Raids resulting in Vlad Dracul’s Night Attack: Biological warfare and mass impalement in the Ottoman Wars, Târgovişte 1462 taking the lead with 33% over Battleship Rampage: Scharnhorst, Gneisenau and Admiral Scheer raid the Atlantic and Indian Oceans 1940–41, which had 25%.
July: Campaign
July's Campaign vote was incredibly tight. The East African Campaign 1914-18 won with 26%, beating The Prussian Crusade 1217–74 by only 1%.
August: Combat
August's book vote was another close one with British Royal Marine vs Argentine Soldier taking 29% of the votes and Iranian Soldier vs Iraqi Soldier taking 25%.


Missed our previous round up? Don’t worry, you can find them here:
January–April


Заключена

Върни се в “Новости от производителите на модели / Manufacturers' news”