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Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България
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1. Osprey's Big Reveal: General Military (1) and Anatomy of a Ship - 2019-09-03 11:23:00
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To navigate your way through the Big Reveal please use the links in the bar above.

On the Big Reveal today, we're unveiling some of our 2020 General Military titles and what's coming up in the Anatomy of a Ship series. Let us know what you think of these books below!

GNA: Be Para Fit
The 4-week formula to elite physical fitness – are you ready to Be PARA Fit?

Revolutionise your lifestyle and transform your fitness with the powerful new programme from Major Sam McGrath, former commander of the legendary PARAs' P Company selection process. Whatever your fitness level, this four-week formula will teach you how to realise your full potential, to master your goals and achieve transformational results.

CHALLENGE yourself and your body as you discover the difference between exercise and effective training.

CONQUER your fears and unlock the true ‘Paratrooper Mindset’, allowing you to believe in your ability to push yourself to new heights.

EMPOWER your life as Major McGrath shows you how to embed elite physical fitness into your everyday life, teaching you how to integrate the essential foundations of good sleep, healthy nutrition, and purposeful activity.

GNA: Blazing Star, Setting Sun
From popular Pacific Theatre expert Jeffrey R. Cox comes this insightful new history of the critical Guadalcanal and Solomons campaign at the height of World War II. His previous book, Morning Star, Rising Sun, had found the US Navy at its absolute nadir and the fate of the Enterprise, the last operational US aircraft carrier at this point in the war, unknown. This new volume completes the history of this crucial campaign, combining detailed research with a novelist’s flair for the dramatic to reveal exactly how, the tide of war finally turned. By the end of February 1944, the Japanese would no longer hold the materiel or skilled manpower advantage. From this point on, the American star was unquestionably on the ascendant, edging Japanese imperialism towards its sunset.

Jeffrey Cox’s analysis and attention to detail are second to none. But what truly sets this book apart is how he combines this microscopic attention to detail, often unearthing new facts along the way, with an engaging style that transports the reader to the heart of the story, bringing the events on the deep blue of the Pacific vividly to life.

GNA: I Will Run Wild
I Will Run Wild tells the story of Americans, British, Dutch, Australians and New Zealanders taken by surprise from Pearl Harbor to Singapore that first Sunday of December 1941, fighting with what they had at hand against a stronger and better-prepared foe, and in so doing creating the basis for the turnaround of fortune and eventual victory.
The book follows the format established in Pacific Thunder and Tidal Wave, using solid historical material and analysis combined with extensive first-hand accounts from new or previously under-utilized sources of events to bring history alive for all readers, from the lay observer to the knowledgeable expert.

GNA: In Good Faith
In Good Faith tells the story from the Japanese surrender in 1945 through America’s involvement in the French Indochina War and the initial advisory missions that followed. It describes how these missions gradually grew in both scope and scale, and how America became ever more committed to the region, especially following the Gulf of Tonkin incident in 1964, which led to the first bombing missions over North Vietnam. It finishes at the climax of one of those operations, Rolling Thunder, and just prior to the first commitment of US ground forces to the war in Vietnam in the spring of 1965. Drawing on the latest research, these two volumes tell the whole story for the first time, including the truth behind the events of the 1964 Gulf of Tonkin incident, which opened the door to Washington’s entry into the war, and which can now be told in full thanks to recently declassified National Security Agency top secret material. Examining in depth both the events and the key figures of the conflict, this is a definitive new history of American engagement in Vietnam.

GNA: Annihilation
This is the third and final book in a trilogy covering the bitter course of World War II in the Ukraine. Under constant pressure from the advancing Soviets, the German Army retreated first beyond the Dnepr, and were then pushed back across the Bug and Dniester. Large numbers of German troops were encircled in the Cherkassy Pocket, and to a lesser extent in the Kamanets-Podolsk and Brody pockets, while German forces in the Crimea were isolated and ultimately destroyed. The casualties suffered by the German forces were immense, forcing the diversion of an increasing proportion of the diminishing strength of the Wehrmacht to the region; this in turn left almost no reserves elsewhere and thus greatly facilitated the devastating blow that fell upon the German Army Group Centre in the summer of 1944.

GNA: Audacious Missions of World War II
Winning World War II was about more than military force. It required guile, and tremendous acts of bravery by Special Forces and intelligence operatives who had the odds stacked against them. Using hundreds of documents and images from The National Archives, including some that have never been seen in print before, this book reveals some of World War II’s most audacious missions.
These include Operation Anthropoid, the plot to assassinate SS General Reinhard Heydrich in Czechoslovakia in 1942, Operation Chariot, the attempt to damage the mighty German warship Tirpitz while she was in dock in St-Nazaire in France; and Operation Mincemeat, a complex plot whereby a corpse, replete with documentation designed to mislead the enemy, was dropped in southern Spain to spread misinformation.

GNA: Blade of a Sword
Combining traditional military history with a trench-level soldier’s view of the Great War, this book tracks the experiences of an elite German regiment throughout the conflict, following the men who fought and died in the service of what would ultimately prove to be a futile cause.
The German 73rd Fusilier Regiment spent the whole of World War I on the Western Front, and was one of the Imperial German Army’s most elite units. Starting with the occupation of Liège, it took part in nearly every major campaign in the West, including the Champagne offensives, the Somme, Vimy Ridge, Passchendaele and the Operation Michael offensives. Using the personal accounts of the soldiers themselves, including Ernst Jünger, author of Storm of Steel, this engrossing story of a regiment at war presents the horror of trench warfare on a human scale, through the eyes of ordinary men-at-arms, as they fought for honour and survival in military history’s most brutal theatre of combat.

GNA: Blood, Metal and Dust
From the high-ranking officer who wrote the still-classified British military analysis of the war in Iraq comes the authoritative history of two conflicts which have overshadowed the beginning of the 21st century. Inextricably linked to the ongoing ‘War on Terror’, the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan dominated more than a decade of international politics, and their influence is felt to this day.
Blood, Metal and Dust is the first military history to offer a comprehensive overview of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, providing in-depth accounts of the operations undertaken by both US and UK forces. Brigadier Ben Barry explores the wars which shaped the modern Middle East, providing a detailed narrative of operations as they unfolded. With unparalleled access to official military accounts and extensive contacts in both the UK and the US militaries, Brigadier Barry is uniquely placed to tell the story of these controversial conflicts, and offers a rounded account of the international campaigns which irrevocably changed the global geopolitical landscape.

GNA: Hitler's Tanks
The Panzers that rolled over Europe were Germany’s most famous fighting force, and are some of the most enduring symbols of World War II. However, at the start of the war, Germany’s tanks were nothing extraordinary and it was operational encounters such as facing the Soviet T-34 during Operation Barbarossa which prompted their intensive development. Tactical innovation gave them an edge where technological development had not, making Hitler's tanks a formidable enemy.
Hitler’s Tanks details the development and operational history of the light Panzer I and II, developed in the 1930s; the 35(t) and 38(t); the medium tanks, the Panzer III and IV, that were the backbone of the Panzer Divisions; the Tiger; and the formidable King Tiger, the heaviest tank to see combat in World War II. Drawing on Osprey’s unique and extensive armour archive, Chris McNab skilfully weaves together the story of the fearsome tanks that transformed armoured warfare and revolutionised land warfare forever.

GNA: British Battle Tanks
This book, the last in a four-part series on British Battle Tanks covering the whole history of British armoured warfare, concentrates on those vehicles that have served following the end of World War II up to the present day.
Starting with the Centurion, the title explores those types that equipped the armoured divisions lined up on the German plains to resist any potential Soviet offensive, as well as in Korea and Suez, including the Chieftain and Conqueror, and modern tanks such as the Challenger 2 which are still in service today. Covering the many variants of these and other tanks in British service as well as their deployments around the world, including in Afghanistan and Iraq, this illustrated volume is a comprehensive guide to the development of British tanks since the Second World War.

ANT: The Battleship USS Iowa
Transferred to the Pacific Fleet in 1944, the USS Iowa first fired her guns in anger in the Marshall Islands campaign, and sunk her first enemy ship, the Katori. The Iowa went on to serve across a number of pivotal Pacific War campaigns. The ship ended the war spending several months bombarding the Japanese Home Islands before the surrender in August 1945.
After taking part in the Korea War, the Iowa was decommissioned in 1958, before being briefly reactivated in the 1980s as part of President Reagan’s 600-Ship Navy Plan. After being decommissioned a second and final time in 1990, the Iowa is now a museum ship in Los Angeles.
This new addition to the Anatomy of the Ship series is illustrated with contemporary photographs, scaled plans of the ship and hundreds of superb 3D illustrations which bring every detail of this historic battleship to life.


2. Gaslands: Refuelled Chop Shop Challenge - Sourmash Mini-Rig - 2019-09-03 07:31:13
The Gaslands: Refuelled Chop Shop Challenge is still going in full swing, with author Mike Hutchinson showing off his impressive creation - the Sourmash Mini-Rig! If you want to show off your cars simply email us at https://ospreypublishing.com/info@ospreygames.co.uk?subject=gaslands%20refuelled%20chop%20shop%20challenge and include 'Chop Shop Challenge' in the subject, and we'll include it in our upcoming gallery of Gaslands awesomness! You can also share your creations on Twitter - just make sure you include #chopshopchallenge in your tweet!
Pete asked me if I wanted to get involved in their "chop shop challenge" and having spent the last three months painting nothing but tiny spaceships, I was well up for a rapid-fire build-and-paint to celebrate the imminent release of Gaslands: Refuelled. I also knew exactly what I wanted to build, as I've been champing at the bit to build a Rusty team since playtesting finished.

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Rusty's Bootleggers
I may have written the rules for them, but I've never got round to building and painting a “high resolution” Rusty team, even though they became pretty much my favourite during playtesting. (So if they turn out to be OP, now you know why!)
They are a bunch of new illustrations in the expanded rulebook, and the one for Rusty is really awesome. I love building cars in homage to David Austin Nash's artwork, and - as fate would have it - I had stumbled across just the right car for the job. (I say "stumbled". I, in fact, mean "stole from a nephew".)
Vehicles in Rusty teams can purchase trailers, which turn them into a sort of mini-war-rig. The trailers get loaded with cargo, each with a different game effect, and so this sponsor provides a very unique hobby challenge for those that are interested in building a fleet of country-and-western-blaring trailer-trash moonshine bootleggers. Of the trailer cargos, I am particularly fond of the "Sourmash Jet Booster" so I roughed out a build for a truck with a ram and a middleweight trailer and two perks, Drive Angry and In For A Penny, to give myself a drink-driving kamikaze bottle-rocket.
Here you can see the final build, before paint:

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The Cheater's Paint Job
As the orange jeep is starting from was already so weirdly similar to the illustration, and my trailer was also an acceptably matching shade of orange, I decided to keep the original paint jobs, and just weather them, rather than starting from scratch.
Weathering existing paint jobs, rather than stripping (which I can never be bothering with) and then priming (which starts you from scratch), can be a really fast and fun way to get a really awesome looking post-apocalyptic team on the table.

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So there she blows. One Sourmash Mini-Rig ready for the table! If you want to find out how Rusty and his trailers work, be sure to order your copy of Gaslands: Refuelled today!


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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 04 сеп 2019, 12:00

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1. Airbus няма да предложи Eurofighter на Канада - 2019-09-03 19:51:01
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Airbus обяви, че заедно с британското правителство, е било взето решение да не се подава оферта за Eurofighter в канадския конкурс за нов боен самолет


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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 04 сеп 2019, 18:00

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1. The Long March - 2019-09-04 09:44:00
Today on the blog Benjamin Lai, author of The Long March 1934–35, writes about a chapter of history, although much revered in China, the details, and especially military aspect, of this campaign was largely ignored in the West. This book is the first book in English to tell the story of the Long March from a military angle.



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The Long March was a strategic retreat undertaken by the Chinese Red Army when being pursued by hordes of government troops. The escape was not only moving its soldiers but their families as well as the supporting staff , as well as all they could take, including the ’kitchen sink‘ from its hideouts in the mountains to a safe haven in the desert plateau in Shaanxi-Gansu in north-west China. It was not a single march but a march by five armies, the First, Second, Fourth Armies, the Seventh Corps as well as the Twenty-Fifth armies, some 304,000 men, women and children. At the end almost two years later, approximately 25 per cent reached the safe haven.
Since that time, the focus of historians and armchair generals when discussing this campaign had been on the reality and facts surrounding the actual march. One of the much-debated points about the Long March was how far did Mao and his armies did walk?
When the West first heard of this event, it was through the pen of Edgar Snow, a leftist American journalist who made the journalist coup of the day by actually interviewing Mao in his rebel safe haven. It was akin to getting a face-to-face interview with Osama bin Laden in the modern context. Edgar asked Mao how far did he walk? ‘Ah,’ said Mao, ‘I don’t know let me think’. After a longish paused, he concluded that he must have walked 25,000 Li. This number was collaborated by Xiao Feng, the Commissar of the First Army headquarter detachment. He wrote in his diary: ‘One day after arriving at the safe haven, Mao told me to collect data from the regiment headquarters of the First Corps, and I presented to him that according to my best estimate the First Army had covered about, 25,000 Li, the longest distance of all the Red Armies’. In Xiao Feng’s dairy, he uses the word Li, a Chinese unit of distance. The trouble with Li is that until the mid-1980s, there was not an agreed standard of measurement. In 1936 when Snow interviewed Mao about the Long March, the Chinese Li can be anything between 500–550 m.

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Last meeting between Mao and Snow December 1970; on the rostrum overlooking Tiananmen Square in Beijing. Mao was using Snow to give a signal to Nixon, that Americans are welcomed to China. After much work behind the scene, in 1972, Nixon was the first American President to visit China.



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The result of Snow’s journalistic coup – the world first western journalist to interview Mao.
Furthermore, when Mao was on the run during the Long March, for much of where he went the Red Army did not have a map of the area and how many kilometres they walked depended on what the farmers told them. Being illiterate, they counted the distance by hours rather than length – you usually will get there by sunset, if you don’t have a cow with you.
In October 2002, two British writers, Ed Jocelyn, who had a PhD in History, and Andrew McEwen, his friend from Essex University, set off to retrace the Red Army's footsteps and record the experiences. According to McEwen, he recorded his retracing of Mao’s journey as 3700 miles or 6000 km, not 8000 miles (or 13000 km) as what is officially registered by Chinese historians. The undertone of this was that the Chinese told a lie. However, the interview was misleading as the journalist did not include McEwen and Jocelyn’s footnote to this claim. In 2002 much of their walk was on modern tarmac paved road while Mao walked on mountain tracks. To avoid the much superior government troops, the Red Army often had to double back and take indirect routes to hide. Usually, the Red Army just didn’t know where they were! Modern Chinese historians are still debating the original track taken as some of the landmarks written in the diaries were simply in the wrong place. In 2005 in his 70th year, veteran Mossad agent turned businessman David Ben Uziel, retraced the path of the III Corps (commanded by Peng Dehuai – who was better known in the West as Commander of the Chinese Forces during the Korean War), part of the First Army (Mao’s force), and recorded more than 12,500 km if he kept off modern roads.
While we may never know exactly how long the Long March was, it was certainly a very long trek. Mao and his followers battled not only an enemy that was hot on their tail but the elements, disease and hunger. This is a story of how a ragtag rebel army wearing straw sandals and equipped with hand-me-down weapons beat a government force ten times their size, with all the modern weaponry of the day, including aeroplanes.

To learn about how Mao rose from obscurity to become a man who would dominate the 20th century, preorder up a copy of CAM 341: The Long March 1934–35: The rise of Mao and the beginning of modern China.


2. Last Days: Zombie Apocalypse: Seasons - Fall - 2019-09-04 07:31:09
Last Days: Zombie Apocalypse: Seasons is a new supplement for Ash Barker's skirmish wargame of survival horror. It introduces a range of new features to the game, which author Ash Barker will be exploring on the blog over the next few weeks. Last week he gave an looked at the challenges posed by Summer, and this week we'll be looking at what you should expect in the Fall!
Oh Fall… the joyous time of unpacking sweaters and being inundated by something called ‘pumpkin spice’ in every major marketing avenue on earth.

I’ve always loved Fall as it marks the transition between two times of the year in Canada. The blazing heat of the summer gives way to a glorious riot of colour as the trees begin to lose their leaves and nature prepares itself for the grip of winter.

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Artwork by Arthur Asa
For a survivor group living without power, running water or other modern conveniences the changing of the seasons can be a reason to be filled with dread. Weather becomes more unpredictable. The nights become longer and the days shorter. The heat of summer potentially gives way at the end of the season to an early freeze. Rival Groups will become more hostile as they too being to feel the worrying onset of the end of the year.

Regardless of the challenges of summer, which may well linger into the Fall, this period will kick off a mad scramble of resource scavenging as not only will Hunger need to be managed (and still quite possibly Thirst), but also the coming Cold will put an immense drain on the resources the Group has available as they must heat the Refuge in addition to keeping everyone well, fed and defended from the Undead. Add to that the environmental dangers of unpredictable and deadly flash floods, tornados or even late-season snowfalls, ice storms and semi-congealed Zombies and there are threats that can creep into the final weeks of Fall and make Winter run even longer.

Savvy Leaders will look to find large scores of Resources during the Fall and build new Refuge Perks to help preserve Food so that precious resources can instead be spent on Fuel. There is also a unique Scenario entitled ‘The Reaping’ which allows for the Groups to attempt to ‘harvest’ the supplies and equipment of an overrun Enclave freshly killed by a horde of Zombies.
Fall can also be an excellent time to be amassing more specialist cold-weather equipment with which to better equip the Characters going forward. While trading in a Scavenge Token for a chance at a cool new weapon may seem like a good idea right now, that Cold Weather gear or Stove may come in extremely handy in the future.
Fall can be challenging, but how a Group performs during these months may well dictate how they survive the coming cold towards the end of the year. It may well pay-off to be Frugal in the short term in order to better survive the dark, freezing months that are ahead…

More about Winter next week!
Last Days: Zombie Apocalypse: Seasons comes out in September 2019 - preorder your copy today and get ready to face new challenges.


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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 05 сеп 2019, 12:00

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1. Saab още не е решил дали ще даде оферта в Канада - 2019-09-04 18:51:27
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Компанията Saab още няма решение за това, дали ще подаде оферта в канадския конкурс за нов многоцелев изтребител. Това съобщава местното издание The Canadian Press, позовавайки се на представители на фирмата.


2. A380 се приземи в София след медицински проблем на борда - 2019-09-04 14:21:12
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Пътнически самолет Airbus A380 на дубайската авиокомпания Emirates се приземи неочаквано на летище София днес, 4 септември 2019 г. Причината за визитата е медицински проблем с един от пасажерите на борда.


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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 06 сеп 2019, 18:00

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1. Osprey's Big Reveal: Men-at-Arms - 2019-09-06 11:23:00
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To navigate your way through the Big Reveal please use the links in the bar above.

Our Big Reveal continues with our Men-at-Arms series. Read on to find out which books will be publishing in 2020 and let us know in the comments which titles you're looking forward to the most.

MAA: Japanese Armies 1868–1878
The restoration of the Meiji Imperial dynasty in 1868, after 250 years of the Tokugawa Shogunate, decisively opened Japan to the outside world and the monarchy embraced modernization, including the creation of a new Westernized army. However, this modernization process was resisted by the traditional Samurai feudal nobility, leading to a series of battles.
During the Boshin War of 1868­–69, a French military adviser, Jules Brunet, changed sides to join the insurgents. They won several engagements before the final crushing of the rebel Ezo Republic. After this point, the Imperial Army continued to modernize along French lines, and social changes began to impoverish Samurai noblemen, who lost their social and political role and their associated privileges. In January 1877, increasing unrest broke out into open rebellion. The Imperial forces were now much stronger and the Samurai made a last stand at Shiroyama on 24 September. This marked the final defeat and displacement of the Samurai class.
This fully illustrated title explores the fall of the Samurai in detail, examining the arms, tactics, key figures of both sides, and charting the increasing Westernization of the Imperial forces.

MAA: Dutch Waffen-SS Legion & Brigade 1941–44
Goebbels’ 1941 propaganda campaign to present Germany's invasion of the USSR as a battle for European civilization against Asian barbarism convinced many men in occupied 'Germanic' European countries, to volunteer to fight on the Russian Front. One of the strongest national legions of such a kind was raised in the Netherlands. The 3,000-man Netherlands Volunteer Legion fought on the Leningrad front in regimental strength, from the Red Army's winter 1941/42 counter-offensive until April 1943. The survivors were then reinforced to form a 5,500-strong Panzergrenadier Brigade, and after anti-partisan service in Croatia, they returned to Army Group North as part of Steiner's III SS Panzer Korps, fighting in the most arduous battles of 1943–44 until driven back into Pomerania. In the final months of the war the division formed the nucleus of the new 23rd SS Volunteer Panzergrenadier Division 'Nederland’.
In this illustrated study of the Dutch Waffen-SS Legion and Brigade, specialist Massimiliano Afiero explores the full history of this important formation from its establishment in 1941 until it was incorporated into the ‘Nederland’ Division in 1944.


MAA: Japan's Asian Allies 1941–45
During the Japanese occupation of large parts of Asia and the Pacific in 1941–45, Japan raised significant numbers of troops to fight alongside them, as well as militias to guard their conquests. The total number of these soldiers is estimated at no fewer than 600,000 men. Many of the recruits from former European colonies hoped for independence as part of the 'Greater East-Asian Co-Prosperity Sphere' proclaimed by Japanese propaganda, but Japan's intentions were entirely cynical. They formed alliances to deny the Allied powers access to territory that they could not actually occupy, and raised these large numbers of auxiliary troops to relieve the manpower burden of occupation, or simply as 'cannon-fodder'.
This extensively researched study examines each of these armies and militias in detail, exploring their history and deployment during World War II, and revealing the intricacies of their arms and equipment with stunning full-colour artwork and previously unpublished contemporary photographs.

MAA: The Normans in Italy 1017–1194
Preceding and simultaneously with the conquest of England by Duke William, other ambitious and aggressive Norman noblemen found it prudent to leave Normandy. Many of these noblemen achieved great victories, acquired rich lands of their own, and perfected a feudal military system that lasted for 200 years. As news of the rich pickings to be had in the south spread in Normandy, they were joined by many other opportunists. Steadily, these Norman noblemen fought their way to local power, defeating in the process the armies of Byzantium, the German 'Holy Roman Empire', and Islamic regional rulers. Finally, in 1130, Roger II founded a unified kingdom incorporating southern Italy and Sicily, which lasted until the death of Tancred of Lecce in 1194 – though its legacy long outlasted Norman political rule.
This beautifully illustrated title explores not only the Norman armies, but the armies of their opponents, with full-colour plates and expert analysis revealing fascinating details about the fighting men of Normandy, Byzantium, the Arab armies and more.

MAA: Armies of the Italian-Turkish War
The Italian expeditionary force that landed in Libya in October 1911 easily defeated the Ottoman division based in the coastal cities. However, the Libyan inland tribes reacted furiously to the Italian conquest, and their insurgency cost the Italians thousands of casualties. To retrieve Italian prestige the government launched a naval campaign in the Dardanelles and the Dodecanese – the last Turkish-held archipelago in the Aegean – in April–May 1912, and landed troops to capture Rhodes. The army finally pushed inland in Libya in July–October, and after brutal fighting the war ended in a treaty that brought Italy all it wanted.
The appearance of the troops involved was varied: the Italians wore both old blue and new grey-green uniforms, as well as white, and also employed Colonial troops from East Africa. The Ottoman Army had also recently changed to more modern khaki uniforms, and their Libyan regulars, as well as the tribal insurgents, add more variation. The navies of both sides will also be illustrated, since naval landing troops were active in the Aegean campaign.

MAA: German Troops in the American Revolutionary War (1)
During the American Revolutionary War (1775–83), German auxiliary troops provided a vital element of the British war effort. Some 30,000 German troops served in North America. Initially feared by the American population, the German troops came to be respected by their opponents. The fighting would inform the tactics and methods of a generation of German officers who returned to Europe after the war, many of whom went on to hold senior commands during the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic wars.
The largest body of German troops was from Hessen-Cassel – 12,000 men including artillery and light troops, the famous Jäger. The only German contingent to be employed as a unit under its own general officers, they were clothed and equipped in the style of Frederick the Great’s Prussians, and were trained in much the same way. This lively study examines the organization, appearance, weapons, and equipment of the Hessen-Cassel troops who fought for King George in the American Revolutionary War.

MAA: Renaissance Armies in Italy 1450–1550
While the Italian Renaissance saw religion beginning to lose its primary role in society to science and the arts, it was also a period of political and military turmoil. Many regional wars were fought between the states ruled by Milan, Venice, Genoa, Florence, the Papacy, Siena and Naples. For more than 50 years starting in 1494 major foreign powers also exploited these divisions to invade Italy, which became the cockpit of their rivalries: both France and Spain made temporary alliances with city states to further their ambitions, and early in the 16th century the Emperor Charles V sent armies from his German realms to support the Spanish. These wars coincided with the growth of disciplined infantry – carrying not only polearms and crossbows but also hand-guns – which proved capable of challenging the previously dominant armoured knights. All the powers involved made widespread use of professional mercenaries, which were at the forefront of the early development of the 'pike and shot' era that succeeded the 'High Middle Ages'. During this period costumes, armour and weapons all showed great variety, due both to their national origins and to the evolution of tactics and technology.


2. Guest Blog - Preparing for Reality's Edge with Bloodbeard's Garage - 2019-09-05 08:46:45
We always love to see players getting into our games, and one player who often catches our eye with his impressive set-ups and battle reports is Søren 'Bloodbeard' Bay from Bloodbeard's Garage! His Last Days: Zombie Apocalypse blogs have all been great reads, and so when we saw how excited he was about Reality's Edge we thought we'd invite him onto the Osprey blog to talk about getting ready for the Cyberpunk Skirmish Wargame. Be sure to follow his Facebook Page and check out all of his content at Bloodbeard's Garage!
Hello fellow sprawlers. Normally I post my hobby stuff under my blog Bloodbeard's Garage, but I’ve been offered to guest blog here at Osprey Games. So I’ll be writing a bit about the process I go through whenever I jump into a new game.
It’s no secret that I’ve been extremely hyped over Reality’s Edge ever since I learned it was coming. And my own anticipation has grown as I’ve planned projects, models and terrain in my mind over the last year. Now there’s three major reasons for me looking forward to this game:
1) It’s an Osprey Games hardback – and the quality of those books have been super high.
2) It’s written by Joseph McGuire – and I’ve already played a lot of This Is Not A Test.
3) It’s cyberpunk – and I love cyberpunk settings. Deus Ex, Shadow Run, Bladerunner.
In this blog I’ll write a few things about my thoughts on the game, my first crew, some terrain pieces and objectives. I’ll put in some WIP shots of stuff I’m working on – and then later I’ll follow up with detailed descriptions and photos of the finished projects.
An actual review of the rules and book in general, will be published on my own blog.
The book

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Reality’s Edge is exactly as I’ve expected; a giant neon and chrome colored sandbox to play with – a 320 pages behemoth of material. Nice little fluff pieces are mixed into rules and item descriptions, so my imagination got going while reading through the book. Most of us will already have a strong idea of own own cyberpunk universe from whatever fiction we prefer, but the book does a good job hammering out the scene with descriptions and artwork. So where to start
Not knowing the balance of the game or having a campaign in progress, I’ll start by simply building a crew of models I find cool and statting them up. I’ve gone for an Enforcer (I imagine my hero close to how I played Deus Ex), Console Cowboy (because hacking is a huge element and Neuromancer is great) Sprawl Ronin (I’ve wanted an actual street samurai for a long time) and two gangers (to bring the punk into cyberpunk). I left plenty of crypto currency in the bank, because it seems there’ll be a lot of expenses fixing up and bailing out my guys.
Next I planned out which scenario to play first and made objectives/NPCs towards that. I usually do this with every game – so I have the everything ready. I ended up with the Electronic Redundancy JOBOP, with a Griefer Avatar variable and Lock Down Hitch.
I'll need to make a few ICE models (thinking white, glossy samurai), a Griefer Avatar (something painted red and shiny) and some CAT terminals. That’s doable, nothing too big to start with. Miniatures
Reality’s Edge offer profiles for a host of NPCs and player characters. There’s really every opportunity to get into the bit collection and build something up. This skirmish book offers so many options, that you’ll risk drowning if going for the ‘complete bestiary and objective collection’.
I’ve been collecting cheap bits and random sprues for this other time, wanting to kit bash all the models for this game. With a lot of cutting and glue I’ve build the below team. No green stuff or sculpting was needed. I was aiming for a badass look, with lots of visible augmentations and some punk.

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Terrain
I always want to play on a fully tied together board – it does everything for my gaming experience. We play for story telling, cinematic action shots and the ongoing campaign. And all this happens for me with a board that fits together.
For my cyberpunk board I wanted to build on what I already had – a huge collection of modern city terrain from my Last Days: Zombie Apocalypse gaming. So with a few specific upgrades, my 3’x3’ board should jump ahead a few hundred years.
‘Asian’ things: Billboards, posters, noodle shops, tuk-tuks, pandas. In all good cyberpunk there’s non-defined Asian stuff mixed in with the English. So a few pieces should make the board pop.
Bright hover vehicles: A few flying cars, trucks and a noodle shop. Get some toy cars, use masking tape to make some scifi stripes, paint in bright colors, use wash to make tainted windows. Perhaps use old ear plugs to make hover exhausts where wheels used to be.
Billboards, adverts and neon: Cyberpunk needs some color among the depressing grey. There need to be billboards and hanging ads in bright or neon colors. Some could be bought, some I can make myself from prints.
Trash and terminals: The sprawl should be filled with nasty alley. There need to be trash piles and discarded furniture around. And then ofcause there need to be terminals in the Sprawl – they are a big part of the game.
Everything should have a very weathered look, so I’m going to use a lot of wash. Work in progress
Here’s where I’m currently at with a lot of projects. Quick pieces to bring out the cyberpunk feel. All this stuff needs printed paper details (posters, adverts, newspaper scatter), further details painted and weathering.
Hover craft
A flying taxi and a noodle shop. Inspired from the Fifth Element and build on a base of cheap Chinese fishing boat models. Made from thin wood and not MDF.

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Tuk-tuks and hover car
Cheap tuk-tuks made from aluminum soda cans, repainted. The hover car is a broken computer mouse with a few details added.

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Food stalls

A neat little set of four food stalls from TTCombat. Upgraded them with some cheap keychains I found. The adverts are glued to some model ship scrap plastic.

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The community
Make sure to check out the community page on Facebook. There’s a bunch of cool inspiration to get there and the file section is already booming with cool stuff. To help get you started quickly, there’s a lot of printable details for terrain and vehicles in there.
Thank you for reading and checking out my process. Make sure to drop a comment and let me know what you think. I’ll be following up this blog when all the stuff is finished.
To see more from Søren, be sure to check out Bloodbeard's Garage and follow his Facebook Page.


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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 07 сеп 2019, 18:00

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1. Nieuwpoort 1600 - 2019-09-07 08:25:00
In today's blog post, Bouko de Groot talks about his most recent title, publishing 19th September 2019: Campaign 334: Nieuwpoort 1600: The first modern battle.


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The angle

I wanted to write about the Nieuwpoort campaign of 1600, because of its great historical importance, because of the challenge it posed to both armies, and because in recent histories it's been largely overshadowed by far less significant, important and bloody campaigns.

The protagonists

Nieuwpoort was a turning point in the long 80 Years' War between the Netherlands and Spain, or to be more precise, between the parliamentarian-ruled Republic of the United Netherlands, aka the United Provinces, aka – back then – the United States, and the authoritarian-ruled Royal Netherlands, aka the Spanish Netherlands. The campaign pitted both country's young military and political leader against each other: Republican Maurice Count of Nassau, later Prince of Orange, versus Royalist Albert Duke of Burgundy, later Archduke of Austria. They both fought with their backs against the wall, neither would be able to retreat: Maurice had a river behind him and an enemy town, Albert marshes and an enemy fort.
Maurice was far more experienced and the architect of the military revolution that would transform the west. The battle of Nieuwpoort was the litmus test of his reforms. Maurice never lost a battle and was a master of manoeuvre warfare. But during this campaign, Albert surprised him. Albert had little experience, was overconfident, and wasted the one opportunity fate gave him to defeat Maurice. By uncharacteristically sacrificing a brigade (and almost his cousin), Maurice bought his army the time to prepare and ultimately win.

The significance

The campaign and especially the battle of Nieuwpoort was in many ways a turning point of history: it introduced Maurice's military revolution to the world and thereby changed the way of war forever, it pushed the rise of the Netherlands as a superpower and the decline of Spain. Thanks to Maurice and Nieuwpoort, the art of war became the science of war. His revolution – introducing drill, two-part commands and standardization – proved to be the bedrock of later Western hegemony and therefore the world we now live in.
The commands, names and formations he devised and then used at Nieuwpoort we still use today. That's why I've called it ‘the first modern battle’. At first sight the whole campaign seemed to have little operational or strategical importance: none of the goals were reached. However, for the remaining 48 years of the long war the Royalists never dared to fight an open battle against the Dutch anymore. Thanks to their victory, Dutch international political influence grew enormously. The victory was also the beginning of the spread of the military reforms and of the rise of the young, upstart Republic.



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A period illustration of the battle – Anonymous, circa 1600
Courtesy of Atlas van Stolk


The slaughter

Just prior to the main battle, Spanish troops of the Royalist army had murdered and executed hundreds of Republicans soldiers who'd either surrendered under a safeguard or were already unarmed prisoners of war. This atrocity wasn't forgotten when just a few hours later the Royalist army had collapsed and the infantry was surrounded.

At the time it was common for infantry to accept the surrender of enemy infantry once the battle was over. But at Nieuwpoort no mercy was shown to the surrounded Spanish foot. Entire regiments were killed to the last man and ceased to exist. Perhaps half the Royalist foot had by that time dispersed to try to find a way back among the dunes. Maurice however organized a proper pursuit as soon as victory was his. In the hours after their army's collapse, most Royalist routers were cut down by cuirassiers, shot dead by musketeers and calivermen, or drowned when trying to escape through the surrounding marshes.

The bloodshed was unprecedented: the battle of Nieuwpoort, fought between two 10,000-men armies along a front of just 1,000 yards, witnessed a staggering 10,000 men killed, not counting the wounded and prisoners. The entire Royalist infantry was destroyed, mostly killed, and more than 120 banners were captured.

The comparison

The number of Royalists killed at Nieuwpoort was higher than at Rocroi in 1643. That battle was also part of the 80 Years’ War: it was one of the actions by the French in their alliance with the Dutch Republic. The number of Royalists killed was also higher than at Breitenfeld against the Swedes in 1631. That battle was part of the Thirty Years War, in which both the Royalist and Republican Netherlands participated. Yet at Rocroi the Royalist army was more than twice as big and at Breitenfeld more than three times.

The battle of Nieuwpoort was similar in size to Naseby, the decisive 1645 battle of the English Civil War, but far bloodier. There too a Royalist army faced off to a new model Parliamentarian army and lost. The French at Rocroi, the Swedes at Breitenfeld and the Parliamentarians at Naseby, they all used the organizations, drills and formations designed by Maurice and introduced to the world at Nieuwpoort.



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A period illustration of the Republicans fording the river – Anonymous, 1730, after Berckenrode, 1600
Courtesy of the Rijksmuseum



The book

Apart from the 50 or so period illustrations, the book offers a huge amount of specially created content: you'll find six formation diagrams, six detailed maps, three bird's eye viewpoints, three never before published flags by Mats Elzinga, three crowded actions scenes crafted by Peter Dennis, and a gunnery table.

I've described the background of both nations, their armies and the campaign. It contains a comprehensive chronology and a very detailed order of battle for both armies, down to the captain of each company. The text contains one landing, two battles, two sieges, two massacres, ten engagements, and four naval actions. I've also used several pages to explain the average army of the time, so it's clearer how and why the Republicans and Royalists were different.


The details

It wasn't easy to cram so much information onto the limited number of pages of the series format and at the same time tell an entertaining story. So I had to leave out some details. Important topics that didn't fit the flow of the story I've put in captions or diagrams: the special mode of Italian-Spanish skirmish fire, the Dutch advancing fire drill, an explanation of why Maurice chose to use ten ranks, and why the caliver (a shorter, lighter firearm, like a carbine) was still used alongside the more powerful musket.

Other less relevant but nonetheless interesting details I've managed to give a place anyway. Like the logistical needs of an army, the French captain who died from drinking sea water, the German captain who was left for dead but miraculously survived, and the Spanish colonel who died from his wounds, but not after discussing the battle with Maurice.

I also couldn't resist a nod to other important battles. There was a prolonged fight for a little round top, exactly as happened at Gettysburg. The Royalist army collapsed around 1815hrs, the year of Waterloo. Both these battles also saw vicious fighting for a strong position, which too happened at Nieuwpoort at the stronghold. And there is the distinct possibility that Maurice had designed his battle plan on Cannae.


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The spoils of war -- Gheyn, 1603
Courtesy of the Rijksmuseum



The writing

When I set out to write this title, I thought it would be a straight forward English abstract of available Dutch, French and Spanish studies. But like my other titles, I quickly discovered that those studies fell far short of a proper analysis of the actual topic. Most only took a single period source and extrapolated from that, ignoring other sources they might have read wherever those contradict their preferred version. Doing so, they missed most of what makes this campaign and battle so interesting and so important.

That meant I had no choice but to dive into the Dutch, English, French, German, Italian, Latin and Spanish sources myself. That in turn made the whole process much, much longer (hence my heartfelt thanks to my spouse). The order of battle alone for example – only two pages! – took at least a month, just to find the names of those hundreds of captains: in those days there weren't any spelling conventions, so the same name could have a dozen spellings, depending on language, writer and publication.


The insights

So what were the things those other studies missed? Just to name a few important ones: it was the first battle where battalions were used as we came to know them, the first where they were named as such and used in several lines. The battle showed the great effect of drill, the military revolution Maurice had started in the mid 1590s. For example, Republican cavalry could face about as a unit and charge the enemy horse they'd just threaded (charged through) again, in the rear. That and the short rallying time the drilled cavalry needed, meant that Royalist cavalry was completely outclassed. The fact that both armies had to adapt to the terrain and split up into small semi-independent units has been mentioned by many, but not how it was done and what this meant.

Certain losses that seemed out of place now make sense, like the mauling of the left hand battalion of Republican regiment Stad & Land. My reconstruction also shows very clearly that the Royalist foot couldn't cope with the second Republican line replacing the first, in other words, how important that innovation by Maurice was. Modern studies name the battle where Maurice sacrificed a brigade to buy time 'Leffingerdijk', when it actually was at Mariakerke. This title is the first to correctly name that battle and give all the proper details. At the end, in the Analysis, I've also explained what lessons both commanders had learned.


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The kind of illustration I didn't use: later reconstructions of the battle. They’re lively but historically inaccurate, although the cuirassier correctly wields his sword in the charge. – Veen circa 1855
Courtesy of the Rijksmuseum

The next title

The very long war has many other great campaigns. Compared to Nieuwpoort, there were bigger naval operations (Breda, 1637), bigger sea battles (Itacamara, 1640), more daring invasions (Luanda, 1641), more important sieges (Batavia, 1618), and more complex and successful campaigns (Den Bosch, 1629). Of course the war had already been raging for 20 years when Maurice took command, and those years saw plenty of action too: the long sieges of Haarlem (1572) and Leiden (1573) come to mind, both with many land and sea battles (and even one sea battle on land!).

After Nieuwpoort there weren't many more big battles though: because of their bloody defeat in the dunes, Royalist armies avoided regular battles against the Republic from then on. Plenty were offered by Maurice and his successors, but all were refused. The majority of the big battles after Nieuwpoort were meeting engagements (Mühlheim, 1605), assaults (Ammi, 1632), and battles abroad as part of a coalition or by private armies (Worms, 1620; Porto Calvo, 1637).

So, which 80YW campaign should I tackle next?

I've also done these three titles on the 80 Years' War: Dutch Armies of the 80 Years' War, Parts 1 and 2 (Men-at-Arms 510 and 513) and Dutch Navies of the 80 Years' War (New Vanguard 263). Together they list the more than 500 major land and sea battles, sieges and landings of the war. Check out www.80yw.org and the accompanying Facebook group, where I post addenda, errata, many flags researched by me and drawn by Mats, and lots of anecdotes, also from other members.

Nieuwpoort 1600 publishes 19th September 2019. Preorder your copy now.


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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 10 сеп 2019, 18:00

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1. Gaslands: Refuelled Chop Shop Challenge - Los Vochos - 2019-09-10 10:23:53
Gaslands: Refuelled comes out in September, but here at Osprey Games HQ we couldn't wait. And so, without further ado, please let us introduce the Gaslands: Refuelled Chop Shop Challenge. Over the next few weeks we are going to be showing off our Gaslands creations, and we invite you all to do the same! If you want to show off your cars simply email us at https://ospreypublishing.com/info@ospreygames.co.uk?subject=gaslands%20refuelled%20chop%20shop%20challenge and include 'Chop Shop Challenge' in the subject, and we'll include it in our upcoming gallery of Gaslands awesomness! You can also share your creations on Twitter - just make sure you include #chopshopchallenge in your tweet!
You can find more articles like this on Phil's blog.
I had so much fun putting together my last car for Gaslands: Refuelled that I snagged a couple more Hot Wheels and set to building a couple more. Both cars are VW Beetles - one a '49 Beetle pick-up, the other simply labelled as "Custom VW Beetle" and so fit together really nicely... so nicely, in fact, that, rather than fill out the team I'd started previously, I immediately thought of them as a new team.

With some education from a friend about the Beetle's Mexican connection, it didn't take long before I started thinking of them as part of Team Caudillo, a Puebla-based subsidiary of Rutherford. For all intents and purposes, though, they're a Rutherford team. Unlike previously, I planned out the full crew before starting on the vehicles.
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El Técnico

El Técnico
Sponsor
Rutherford
Vehicle Type
Special Rules
Cost
Build Slots
Car
-
12
2
Weapons
Cost
Build Slots
Handguns
-
-
Mortar (forward-facing)
4
1
Mine Dropper (rear-facing)
1
1
Upgrades
Cost
Build Slots
-
-
-
Perks
Badass & Military
Cost
Total Cost
Well Stocked
-
19
Televised Carnage
-
Fully Loaded
2

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El Rudo

El Rudo
Sponsor
Rutherford
Vehicle Type
Special Rules
Cost
Build Slots
Truck
-
15
3
Weapons
Cost
Build Slots
Handguns
-
-
Heavy Machine Gun (front-facing)
3
1
Heavy Machine Gun (front-facing)
3
1
Upgrades
Cost
Build Slots
Armour Plating
4
1
Perks
Badass & Military
Cost
Total Cost
Well Stocked
-
31
Televised Carnage
-
Rapid Fire
2
Loader
2
Dead-Eye
2

Following on from Dusty Roads, I maintained the wrestling theme - lucha libre in this case - with these vehicles. "El Técnico" is the lucha equivalent of 'Face' or 'Good Guy', while "El Rudo" is 'Heel' or 'Bad Guy'. El Técnico is a basic car armed with a mortar and a mine dropper. I also gave it the Fully Loaded perk to make full use of the boost to both weapons' ammo rating. El Rudo is more of a blunt instrument, designed to hurl out vast quantities of bullets from its two heavy machine guns. This is achieved by piling on the Rapid Fire, Loader, and Dead-Eye perks, while armour plating helps to keep it in the game for longer - it's a proper gun truck. Combined, the pair add up to a full crew's worth of 50 points.

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The build was really swift and simple. El Técnico's roof rack is already on the model, so it was a simple case of gluing a mortar to it. Similarly, El Rudo got two machine guns on its roof. Both weapons are resin test casts from North Star's upcoming Implements of Carnage sprue for Gaslands. Very nice pieces, and all I really did was clip down the gun barrels so that they overhung the cab less.

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Painting-wise, my original plan was to continue the lucha libre theme, using a lucha mask stamp as a team logo. A test-run, however, revealed that it proved just a little too large for the doors, and an awkward fit on the ridged bonnets. Plan B, then was to just keep it simple, with a blue-and-metal palette reminiscent of the mask of Blue Demon. Drybrush pretty much everything with khaki and metal for weathering, then coat it all with a brown wash, before picking out the tyres, windscreens, and weaponry with a dark wash. Varnish and add a bit of static grass - job's a good'un.

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I don't know if they're going to win any races, but I'd hope that they'll be able to blow up some other vehicles.

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Until next time...
Gaslands: Refuelled comes out on 19 September. Preorder your copy today!


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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 11 сеп 2019, 18:00

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1. Osprey's Big Reveal: Air Campaign - 2019-09-11 11:23:00
ELI NVG COM/XPL CBT GNA RAID CAM DUE GNM/ANT MAA ACM ??? ??? ???
To navigate your way through the Big Reveal please use the links in the bar above.

Our 2020 Air Campaign books look at several major conflicts across the 20th century, which ones are on your wish list?

ACM: Schweinfurt–Regensburg 1943
In 1943, the USAAF and RAF launched the Combined Bomber Offensive, designed to systematically destroy the industries that the German war machine relied on. At the top of the hit list were aircraft factories and plants making ball-bearings – a component thought to be a critical vulnerability. Schweinfurt in southern Germany was home to much of the ball-bearing industry and, together with the Messerschmitt factory in Regensburg, which built Bf 109 fighters, it was targeted in a huge and innovative strike.
Although the attack on Regensburg was successful, the damage to Schweinfurt only temporarily stalled production, and the Eighth Air Force had suffered heavy losses. It would take a sustained campaign, not just a single raid, to cripple the Schweinfurt works. However, when a follow-up raid was finally launched two months later, the losses sustained were even greater, and nearly a thousand US airmen were killed on the two operations. This title details the ‘double strike’ in full, exploring the tactics, aircraft, and events of this historic mission.

ACM: Battle of the Atlantic 1939–41
In his six-volume series The Second World War, Winston Churchill wrote 'The only thing that ever really frightened me during the war was the U-boat peril.' Initially, however, everyone was surprised at the effectiveness of the submarines. Only faulty German torpedoes and the restricted number of available U-boats limited their success.
Astonishingly, Britain had the major piece of the solution to the U-Boat threat from the opening days of World War II: the anti-submarine aircraft. If it had been used assiduously and effectively in the first months of the war, Britain might have won the Battle of the Atlantic in its first year. Instead, the opportunity was missed and the Battle of the Atlantic continued until Germany’s surrender in May 1945.
This title examines the role played by aircraft in the early years of the Battle of the Atlantic. Highlighting their success when employed effectively, the book follows these early operations to show how and why aircraft were initially misused. It also traces the development of technologies which made aircraft much more effective submarine-killers including radar and depth charges.


ACM: Legion Condor 1936–39
The Luftwaffe sent 20,000 officers and men to Spain from 1936 to 1939, and the Condor Legion carried out many missions in support of the Spanish Nationalist forces and played a lead role in many key campaigns of the war. Aircraft that would play a significant role in the combat operations of World War II saw their first action in Spain. Condor Legion bombers attacked strategic targets, Republican logistics and transport behind the lines, German bombers and fighters provided highly effective close air support for the front-line troops, and German fighters and anti-aircraft units ensured Nationalist control of the air.
In effect, the Spanish Civil War proved to be the training ground for the Blitzkrieg which would be unleashed across Europe in the years that followed. In this rigorous new analysis, Legion Condor expert James Corum explores both the history and impact of the Luftwaffe’s engagement during the Spanish Civil War and the role that engagement played in the development of the Luftwaffe strategy which would be used to such devastating effect in the years that followed.

ACM: The Italian Blitz 1940–43
Between June 1940 and August 1943, RAF Bomber Command undertook a little-known strategic bombing campaign in Europe. The target was Mussolini’s Italy. The bombing campaign against Italy can be divided into a number of phases, with each one having its own specific goals. However, each also furthered the ultimate aim of forcing Italy’s final capitulation, demonstrating that the tactic of area-bombing was not just about the destruction of an enemy’s cities, as it could also fulfil wider strategic and political objectives. Indeed, the intensity and frequency of attack was greatly controlled, and the heavy bombing of Italy was only ever sanctioned by Britain’s civilian war leaders to achieve both military and political goals. The issue of target-selection was also subject to a similar political restriction; cities and ports like Milan, Turin, Genoa and La Spezia were sanctioned under an official Directive, but other places, such as Verona, Venice, Florence and, above all, Rome, remained off-limits.
This fascinating title explores the political, motivational and strategic challenges of the campaign in full.

ACM: Ho Chi Minh Trail 1964–73
The complex and constantly-changing web of political agreements between Washington and the governments of neutral Laos, Cambodia and Thailand together with the consequent involvement of the CIA meant that much of The Trails War had to be covert. Nevertheless, the campaign had a profound effect on the outcome of the war and on its perception in the USA.
In the north, the Barrel Roll campaign was operated by USAF rescue services who carried out extremely hazardous missions to recover aircrew. At the same time, many thousands of North Vietnamese troops and civilians repeatedly made the long, arduous journey along the trail in trucks or, pushing French bicycles laden with ammunition and rice. Under constant threat of air attack, they devised extremely ingenious, simple means of survival, although very many died. Meanwhile further south, Arc Light B-52 strikes were flown, and the fearsome AC-130 introduced to cut the trails. It was a campaign which endured for the entire Vietnam War and one in which nothing better than partial success could ever be achieved by the USA.

ACM: Malaya & Dutch East Indies 1941–42
The Japanese campaign to occupy the Netherlands East Indies (NEI) was even more dependent on airpower since the Japanese would have to seize a series of airfields on various islands to support their leapfrog advance. This campaign was supported almost exclusively by the IJNAF (The Imperial Japanese Navy Air Force). Facing the Japanese was a mixed bag of Allied air units, including the Dutch East Indies Air Squadron with a mix of Dutch, German, and American designed and supplied aircraft. The USAAF also sent significant, but ultimately an inadequate number of aircraft to Java. The RAF fell back to airfields on Sumatra, NEI, in the last stages of the Malaya campaign, and was involved in the final stages of the campaign to defend the NEI. For the same reason the Allied air campaign failed in Malaya, the This effort to defend the NEI was also futile.

ACM: “Big Week” 1944
In the years before World War II, it was believed that strategic bombing would win wars, but none foresaw the devastation that German radar-directed interceptors would inflict on large bomber formations.
With the increasingly urgent need to eliminate German fighter-aircraft prior to D-Day, a concerted two-phase effort was launched, codenamed ‘Operation Argument’. Targeting aircraft factories with hundreds of heavy bombers escorted by the new long-range P-51 Mustang, the operation, known to history as the ‘Big Week’ campaign, was designed to destroy aircraft production on the ground, and force the Luftwaffe into combat to defend these vital facilities – when it was intended that the new escort fighters would take their toll on the German interceptors.
This is a detailed and fascinating analysis of history’s first-ever successful offensive counter-air (OCA) campaign.


2. Last Days: Zombie Apocalypse: Seasons - Winter - 2019-09-11 07:51:31
Last Days: Zombie Apocalypse: Seasons is a new supplement for Ash Barker's skirmish wargame of survival horror. It introduces a range of new features to the game, which author Ash Barker will be exploring on the blog over the next few weeks. Last week he gave an looked at the challenges posed by the Fall, and this week we'll be looking at what you should expect as Winter creeps in!
Some of my most enduring memories of my youth are of the Canadian winter in our northern territories.
At some point in the seventies my father and his cousin dragged an old pre-fabricated shed out to a Lake some eleven hours north of Toronto. It had plywood walls, no insulation and a tiny 12” window to the front and a single door. The built bunks into it and an old fuel-drum conversion was built into it as a stove and heat source. No power, no water (except from the lake). At eighteen months old my dad would drag my mum and I out there in the winter to camp, snowshoe and cross-country ski as a getaway. Some of my earliest memories are from that cabin, picking berries out on the islands that bears hadn’t swum out to and catching fish in the lake. We had to canoe across from the logging line we parked our old truck at, but in the winter we could haul sledges by Snowmobile instead.

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Artwork by Arthur Asa
I made the mistake of stepping off the side of that sledge when I was eight or nine years old. I sunk into the snow up to my hip. I had to grip the side of the sledge and haul myself back into it almost like I was climbing into a boat. My friends back in my hometown barely believed these stories on the playground and most accused me of exaggerating.

Except I wasn’t exaggerating. Life without someone to clear your roads of snow or a furnace to keep your home warm and snug, powered by the electricity you’ll never really think about or the gas lines you only really notice when you bump into one on the side of the house, would be very different indeed. I got a taste of that life as I helped dad chainsaw deadfall and then split it by hand for the stove. Spending eight hours of a day to ensure you had two or three days of warmth puts things into stark relief. Waking up overnight to poke the coals to life and put another well-seasoned piece of hardwood (because a softwood piece of lumber would burn too fast) into the stove was a rude task, and I’ll never forget hearing the beep of my father’s old aviator’s watch reminding him to do so. The alternative would be to wake with half the cabin frozen, despite the chip-insulation he and his cousin had walled up in it years before.

This is the world Survivor Groups will be thrust into in the Winter. How prepared would you be for the realities or sub-zero temperatures in structures ill-fitted to enduring them? Most will have long-since had their pipes freeze and burst, draining the remaining fresh water from local towers or making even a well-water system inoperable. Twelve foot ceilings look wonderful when you have forced air but siphon all that warmth away from the inhabitants without it.

Preparing for Winter will be one of the greatest challenges the leaders endure. Even once that is done, there will be the realities of continuing to search for supplies out in the wind and snow. Sudden storms, icy rain or even total whiteout blizzards can ensnare the Characters during their expeditions and quickly become deadly. Larger refuges which seem alluring for the space they provide become hungry monsters gobbling up resources to heat.

These dark months seem to go on forever. Manage your group wisely, or not all the Characters will see the relief of Spring.
Last Days: Zombie Apocalypse: Seasons comes out in September 2019 - preorder your copy today and get ready to face new challenges.


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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 12 сеп 2019, 12:00

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1. Полша получи разрешение да купи 32 броя F-35 за $6,5 млрд. - 2019-09-11 18:43:26
Изображение
Държавният департамент на САЩ формално разреши на Полша да купи 32 изтребителя F-35A. Очакваната цена на сделката е $6,5 млрд. Това се чете в съобщение до американския Конгрес на агенцията за сътрудничество в областта на отбраната DSCA от днес, 11 септември 2019 г.


2. Четири Су-25 са изпратени за ремонт в Беларус - 2019-09-11 17:25:04
Изображение
Общо четири български щурмови самолети Су-25 са били изпратени за ремонт в Беларус. Първата машина бе изпратена на 28 август 2019 г.


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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 12 сеп 2019, 18:00

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1. The Anarchy: The Relentless Rise of the East India Company - 2019-09-12 10:28:00
Today on the blog, William Dalrymple, bestselling historian and author of The Anarchy: The Relentless Rise of the East India Company, introduces his book and examines the East India Company. Watch the videos below to find out more.


Изображение


Who were the East India Company? William Dalrymple introduces his book The Anarchy: The Relentless Rise of the East India Company.



From unstable sociopath Robert Clive (or 'Clive of India') to the more gentle figure of Shah Alam, William Dalrymple delves into the characters involved in the history.


William Dalrymple explores what we can learn by looking back at the history of the East India Company.




Click here to order your copy of The Anarchy.


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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 13 сеп 2019, 12:00

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1. Полша очаква да намали цена на F-35 - 2019-09-12 20:07:07
Изображение
Полша очаква сериозно да свали цената на изтребителите F-35, които смята да купи. Това заяви министърът на отбраната на страната Мариуш Блашчак.


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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 13 сеп 2019, 18:04

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1. MacArthur’s Air Force - 2019-09-13 10:41:00
In today's blog post, Bill Yenne, author of MacArthur’s Air Force gives a brief overview of General Douglas MacArthur's association with airpower throughout his career.



Изображение

General Douglas MacArthur was one of the towering figures of World War II, and of the twentieth century, but his leadership of the Far East Air Forces (FEAF) – the second largest air force in the USAAF – during the war is often overlooked. So too is his leadership role in a long series of other organizations which could each be called “MacArthur’s Air Force.”
MacArthur was at the end of his life when mine was just starting. I have always been interested in his career, and as an aviation and airpower author, I wanted to tell the story of his long association with airpower, beginning with the court martial of Billy Mitchell, and climaxing in the jet age over Korea.
Anecdotes discussing seminal early experiences with airpower for military officers during the first half of the twentieth century are often set on battlefields, on training fields, or aloft on memorable first flights. With Douglas MacArthur, this dramatic anecdote is set in a Washington DC courtroom in 1925.
The charismatic Billy Mitchell, both pioneer and prophet in the early years of American military aviation, was court-martialed for insubordination, but his theories on strategic airpower – later proven in World War II – were then on trial. Mitchell was convicted, but at least one vote was cast for acquittal, and it was that of Major General Douglas MacArthur.
Between that court-martial and the American entry into World War II, the term “MacArthur’s Air Force” could be applied to a series of entities within MacArthur’s chains of command:
(1) With MacArthur as Chief of Staff of the US Army (1930–1935), it was the US Army Air Corps.
(2) When he was field marshal of the Philippine Army (1936–1941), it was the Philippine Army Air Corps.
(3) In August 1941, as MacArthur was recalled to active duty to command US Army assets in the far East, his chain of the command contained the Far East Air Force (FEAF) of the USAAF.
(4) After the US entered the war against Japan, the remnants of the badly damaged FEAF were reconstituted as the Fifth Air Force of the USAAF.
December 8, 1941, in the opening Japanese air attacks against the Philippines, the FEAF was almost entirely wiped out. This story, like those of the subsequent American defeat in the Philippines, and of MacArthur’s escape, is well known. So too, are the stories of how MacArthur, as Allied commander for the South West Pacific Area (SWPA), rebuilt American power in the Far East.
Playing a pivotal role in the rebuilding of the Fifth Air Force component of the SWPA command was Major General George Churchill Kenney, who arrived in Australian July 1942 to assume command. He quickly made himself indispensable as one of MacArthur’s small coterie of right-hand men. In turn, this book looks at Kenney’s own small coterie of right-hand airmen – Ennis Whitehead, Ken Walker, Paul Wurtsmith, and the colorful, larger-than-life Pappy Gunn – and the roles they played.
For MacArthur and Kenney, this challenge of rebuilding was exacerbated by the global strategy adopted by Roosevelt and Churchill to direct the primary attention of the Allies to the war against Germany. Allied operations in the SWPA – from New Guinea to New Britain to Australia – had to be executed with less equipment and personnel than were available to units formed to fight Germany.
They did well with what they had. When they were sent medium bombers instead of heavy bombers, they developed the technique of attacking Japanese shipping using “skip bombing,” dropping a bomb at very low altitude and allowing it to skip across the water until it hit the side of a ship. This proved ideal for use in the SWPA, and became a signature tactic of Kenney’s airmen.
It was not just in the combat operations that the Fifth Air Force excelled. Kenney also pioneered tactical airlift, and in so doing, he turned MacArthur into an airlift activist. In September 1942, Kenney talked MacArthur into letting him transport the entire 128th Infantry to New Guinea. When Kenney did in hours what would have taken days by sea, MacArthur was sold on the idea, which was replicated numerous times.
MacArthur not only became an outspoken exponent of the idea of airpower, he made it the cornerstone of his strategic doctrine. Indeed, MacArthur’s legendary “island-hopping” strategy hinged on airpower. It was a strategic vision built upon a succession of air bases, each one captured from the enemy to support the capture of the next. Thanks to airpower, MacArthur’s forces could leap forward across the strategic map, bypassing enemy strongholds – such as infamous Rabaul – and letting them “wither on the vine,” because MacArthur’s Air Force could prevent them from being resupplied.
In 1942, MacArthur’s Air Force had been the Fifth Air Force alone, but by 1944, the Seventh and Thirteenth were added to form the Far East Air Forces (like the earlier FEAF, but now plural). By 1945, MacArthur’s Air Force had evolved from just a handful of about a dozen combat-worthy aircraft into a command possessing 4,004 combat aircraft, 433 reconnaissance aircraft, and 922 transports. It was the second largest air force in the USAAF after the “Mighty Eighth” in the European Theater of Operations.
Most histories of the FEAF end with the surrender of Japan, just as most biographies of MacArthur use that point in history to make the transition from the military to the political aspects of his role as Supreme Commander for the Allied Powers (SCAP). Yet the FEAF continued to exist during the period of the Allied occupation of Japan, performing a variety of missions, from transport to photoreconnaissance. Many of the FEAF bases established in the late 1940s under MacArthur are still part of the Pacific network of USAF bases today.
The final iteration of MacArthur’s Air Force came in 1950 with the start of the Korean War when MacArthur himself became Commander in Chief of the United Nations Command. His FEAF, especially the Fifth Air Force component, shouldered almost the full load of combat air operations for the UN during the first year of the Korean War. When MacArthur left the Far East in 1951 – having been relieved of command for the same sort of outspokenness that got Billy Mitchell in trouble – his FEAF had achieved air superiority over the Korean peninsula, and they would maintain it through to the end of the Korean War.
As his appreciation of airpower evolved and grew, General Douglas MacArthur commanded a series of air forces, some better known than others, and I feel that it was time to discuss them all as elements within the broader historic context of his career.

To find out more, order your copy of MacArthur’s Air Force.


2. Osprey Obituaries - Bill Hess - 2019-09-12 15:30:31
Highly respected Osprey author William N ‘Bill’ Hess passed away on 4 September 2019. A veteran of nearly seven years’ service in the US Army Air Force and US Air Force, he flew as an aerial gunner in B-17 Flying Fortresses with the Fifteenth Air Force and chalked up 16 missions before his aircraft fell to enemy flak. He spent the rest of the war as a PoW. Hess wrote more than 25 books (including four for Osprey) on World War 2 aircraft and aviators and was an Honorary and Official Historian of the American Fighter Aces’ Association, as well as a member of the Air Forces Association and American Ex-Prisoners of War. A terrific writer and generous mentor to many would-be authors, Bill will be sadly missed by all those who knew him, or read his many fine books.


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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 14 сеп 2019, 12:00

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1. МО пусна обществена поръчка за доставка на леки учебни самолети за ВВС - 2019-09-13 15:49:42
Изображение
Министерство на отбраната стартира процедура за възлагане на обществена поръчка за доставка на до четири леки витлови учебно-тренировъчни самолети за нуждите на ВВС. Това става с решение на военния министър Красимир Каракачанов, подписано на 9 септември 2019 г., и публикувано днес, 13 септември.


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1. Osprey's Big Reveal: Weapon - 2019-09-14 11:23:00
ELI NVG COM/XPL CBT GNA RAID CAM DUE GNM/ANT MAA ACM WPN ??? ???
To navigate your way through the Big Reveal please use the links in the bar above.

From spathas to tanks, the Weapon series has a fantastic range of books publishing in 2020. Find out more about the upcoming titles and let us know which ones are your favourites!

WPN: The Spatha
Adopted from the Celts in the 1st century BC, the spatha, a lethal and formidable chopping blade, became the primary sword of the Roman soldier in the Later Empire. Over the following centuries, the blade, its scabbard, and its system of carriage underwent a series of developments, until by the 3rd century AD it was the universal sidearm of both infantry and cavalry. Thanks to its long reach, the spatha was the ideal cavalry weapon, replacing the long gladius Hispaniensis in the later Republican period. It remained the main Roman sword into the Late Roman period and its influence survived into the Dark Ages with Byzantine, Carolingian and Viking blades.
Drawing together historical accounts, excavated artefacts and the results of the latest scientific analyses of the blades, renowned authority M.C. Bishop reveals the full history of the development, technology, training and use of the spatha: the sword that defended an empire.

WPN: The Browning High-Power Pistol
Making its debut in 1935, the Browning High-Power was the world’s most widely used military pistol for much of the 20th century. Military and law-enforcement agencies in more than 90 countries have issued the High-Power and it has seen combat in conflicts from World War II through to the ‘War on Terror’. After conquering Belgium, Nazi Germany produced more than 300,000 High-Powers for use by the Waffen-SS, Fallschirmjäger and others, and after 1945 the High-Power became standard for most NATO-armed forces as well as scores of others.
Chambered for the 9×19mm Luger cartridge, John Browning’s High-Power improved on the classic Colt M1911 design, especially in its use of a far simpler takedown system. During its eight-decade production run at Fabrique Nationale (FN) in Belgium, the design evolved slightly, but a 2017 High-Power was still easily recognizable as a descendant of the original model. Packed with gripping material including detailed technical specifications, contemporary photographs and highly accurate artist’s renditions, this title is a comprehensive and informative guide to one of the world’s most iconic semi-automatic pistols.


WPN: The Medieval Longsword
The formidable European longsword – featuring a double-edged straight blade in excess of 40in, and capable of being used with one or both hands – remains one of the most impressive and distinctive edged weapons of the late medieval era. Also known as the ‘bastard’ sword and the ‘hand-and-a-half’ sword, the longsword evolved from the war swords and great swords of the 14th century, and emerged as a battlefield weapon in the early stages of the Hundred Years’ War. It went on to become a key weapon on the battlefields of late medieval Europe, creating a new system of sword fighting.
Drawing together period sources, modern technical analysis and his own experiences with the longsword, Neil Grant explores the origins, manufacture and evolving use of this iconic late-medieval edged weapon. Illustrated throughout with specially commissioned full-colour artwork and an array of period illustrations and close-up photographs, this is the enthralling story of one of late-medieval Europe's most distinctive and deadly close-combat weapons.

WPN: The PIAT
Designed in 1942, Britain’s innovative Projector, Infantry, Anti-Tank (PIAT) provided British and Commonwealth troops with a much-needed means of taking on Germany’s formidable Panzers. Replacing the inadequate Boys anti-tank rifle, it was conceived in the top-secret World War II research and development organization known colloquially as ‘Churchill’s Toyshop’, alongside other ingenious weapons such as the sticky bomb, the limpet mine and the time-pencil fuse.
Relying on a powerful spring to launch its ordnance, the PIAT had a limited effective range. Troops required nerves of steel to get close enough to an enemy tank to ensure a direct hit, often approaching to within 50ft of the target. A front-line weapon in every theatre of the conflict in which Commonwealth troops fought, from Europe to the Far East, the PIAT remained in service after 1945, seeing action with British troops during the Malayan Emergency, Greek Civil War and the Korean War. This illustrated study combines detailed research with expert analysis to reveal the full story of the design, development and deployment of this revolutionary weapon.

WPN: Weapons of the Civil War Cavalryman
During the American Civil War the mounted soldiers fighting on both sides carried a wide array of weapons, from sabers and lances to carbines, revolvers, and other firearms. Though some sections of the cavalry placed their trust in the saber, the advent of viable breechloading carbines – especially repeaters such as the Spencer – was to transform warfare within little more than a decade of General Lee’s final surrender at Appomattox. However, output struggled to keep up with unprecedented demands. In addition, almost unparalleled losses of men and equipment ensured that almost any firearm, effectual or not, could be pressed into service. The sheer variety of weaponry carried reflected the mounted soldiers’ various roles in different theaters of operation, but also the availability – or otherwise – of weapons, notably on the Confederate side.
Fully illustrated, this study assesses the effectiveness of the many different weapons arming the Civil War cavalryman and considers the decisions made after 1865 concerning the armament of the US cavalry.

WPN: Early Military Rifles
The military use of rifled firearms evolved together with the operational art of war in the century after 1740. The conduct of combat operations in open order during the 18th and 19th centuries required an improved firearm with more accuracy than the standard-issue smoothbore infantry musket. The appearance of a new type of regular light infantry soldier and an innovative military firearm – the rifle – marked the beginning of a new age in the history of warfare.
Rifle-armed specialists fought for several nations during the Napoleonic Wars, but it was the decades after 1815 that saw the appearance of successful rifled percussion firearms, paving the way for the widespread issue of rifled weapons, a development accelerated by the Prussian adoption of the Dreyse ‘needle gun’ in 1848. The French Minié rifle (1849) was the first successful conical ball rifle concept to be issued to regular troops in large numbers, thereby transforming infantry warfare. Fully illustrated, this study charts the development, combat use, influence and legacy of rifled firearms in a host of conflicts.


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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 15 сеп 2019, 18:00

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1. The Intruder Dornier Do 17 Z-7 and Z-10 1940–1941 - 2019-09-15 09:53:00
On the blog today, Chris Goss, author of Dornier Do 17 Units of World War 2, gives a brief overview of his book.


Изображение

In June 1940, Maj Wolfgang Falck, formerly of 2 Staffel/Zerstörergeschwader 76 (2./ZG 76) and latterly commander of I./ZG 1 was tasked to form a nightfighter unit for defence of the Reich. The preferred nightfighters were the Messerschmitt Bf 110 and Junkers Ju 88C-2/C-4 but there would also be two versions of the Do 17 used as nightfighters – the Z-7 Kauz I and the Z-10 Kauz II (‘Kauz’ translated as ‘Screech Owl’). The glazed nose was removed from a Do 17 Z-3 and replaced by the nose from a Ju 88C-2/C-4. The armament was three 7.9mm machine guns and one 20mm cannon and the aircraft designated the Do 17Z-7. This was soon found to be unsatisfactory and an entirely new nose designed which increased the armament to four machine guns and two cannon. In the tip of the nose was an infra-red spotlight called Spanner-Anlage which was later replaced by first-generation FuG 202 Liechtenstein radar. This aircraft was now designated the Do 17Z-10.
Precise numbers of Do 17Z-7 and Z-10s are hard to define but it is thought that eight Z-7s were produced and the survivors were later converted to be Z-10s of which around 11 were produced. The Z-7 first entered service with I./Nachtjagdgeschwader 1 (I./NJG 1) on or about 22 June 1940 and the first recorded combat probably came on the early hours of 29 June 1940 when a Whitley of 58 Squadron flown by Plt Off Bill Espley reported damaging a nightfighter near Eindhoven. A Do 17Z-7 of 1./NJG 1 coded G9+GK and flown by Uffz Hugo Schwarz was damaged in combat and later crash-landed near Mönchengladbach. Schwarz and his radio operator Fw Gerhard Palm were both injured while the engineer Fw Ludwig Born later died of his wounds.
In August 1940, the Do 17Z-7s and Z-10s now became part of II./NJG 1. The Gruppe would be commanded by Maj Karl-Heinrich Heyse, an experienced bomber pilot. Two of the Staffel operated the Ju 88C-2/C-4 – 4 Staffel was commanded by Oblt Herbert Bönsch while 6 Staffel was commanded by Oblt Karl Hülshoff. Just 5 Staffel appears to have operated the Do 17Z-7/Z-10 and was commanded by Hptm Rolf Jung. However, Maj Heyse would be reported missing in action over the North Sea on 23 November 1940 while flying a Ju 88C-4 and was replaced by Hülshoff and, as on 11 September 1940 II./NJG 1 had become I./NJG 2, command of Hülshoff's 3./NJG 2 went to Oblt Ulrich Mayer.On 17 July 1940, Oberst Josef Kammhuber was given command of the new 1 Nachtjagddivision. He firmly believed that suitably converted bombers such as the Do 17Z and Ju 88 flown by experienced crews would be ideal for Fernnachtjadg (long range nightfighter) missions over the UK and later said:
‘When I want to kill wasps, I smoke out their nest. I don't swat insects in the air one at a time, I go to the nest when they are in!’
So it was that II./NJG 1 and then I./NJG 2 began intruder operations over British airfields from Gilze-Rijen in Holland.
It is difficult to tie the majority of 2./NJG 2's kills to the Kauz II as it was only used in very small numbers and was soon replaced by the Ju 88C. For example, during the period June to October 1940, Do 17Z-7s and Z-10s were only used on 19 nights flying 22 sorties. Uffz Vincenz Giessübel flew his first intruder mission in a Do 17Z-10 on the night of 15/16 November 1940 and only flew another three before the end of the year.
However, the first recorded successful interception by a Do 17Z-10 came on the night of 9 September 1940 and was the first success of the war for Fw Hermann Sommer of 5./NJG 1, albeit his claim was optimistic. He had taken off from Gilze-Rijen at 2105hrs and claimed to have shot down a Blenheim in the circuit at RAF Waddington in Lincolnshire at 2315hrs. Although not mentioned in any detail in the 15 Squadron records, it is believed that Sommer attacked a Blenheim flown by Plt Off James Kee who was the pilot of one of ten aircraft briefed to attack Ostende harbour. All that it is said is that he was attacked by an enemy aircraft and successfully landed the damaged aircraft at RAF Wyton.
The first confirmed kill by a Do 17Z-10 came at 2125hrs on 16 October 1940 and was credited to Lt Ludwig Becker. 4./NJG 1 was still operating the Do 17Z-10 before converting to the Bf 110 shortly afterwards; Becker recorded the following:
‘I was well positioned at the correct altitude of 3300m and directed onto enemy by a series of continual corrections. Suddenly I saw an aircraft in the moonlight about 100m above and to the left. On moving closer I made it out to be a Vickers Wellington. Slowly I closed in behind and aimed a burst of five to six seconds duration at the fuselage. The starboard engine caught fire immediately and I pulled my aircraft up. For a while the Englishman flew on, losing height rapidly. The fire died away but I then saw him spin towards the ground and burst into flames on crashing.’
The Wellington was not English but Czech and from 311 Squadron engaged in at attack on Kiel. Plt Off Bohumil Landa and three of his crew were killed when the bomber crashed at Oosterwolde in Holland but two more crew were captured.
The first confirmed intruder success and almost definitely caused by a Do 17Z-10 was a Hampden shot down by Lt Heinz Völker near Scampton at 0030hrs on 28 October. The 49 Squadron Operational Record Book states what happened:
‘One aircraft was attacked by an enemy aircraft while circling the Q site on return. The aircraft suffered slight damage including three burst tyres and shot accumulator. Hampden X3027 landed in the sea half a mile off Skegness. It is believed that they had been shot up by an enemy aircraft while over this aerodrome [Scampton].’
The damaged Hampden X3001coded EA-H was flown by Plt Off John Green who landed without incident at 0140hrs but there were no survivors from Plt Off John Bufton's aircraft. Völker would then claim a Blenheim over the North Sea on the night of 22 December again probably flying a Do 17Z-10 but this cannot be matched with any RAF losses. In 1941, Völker would convert to the Ju 88C-2/C-4 and fly with 3./NJG 2 claiming another five RAF aircraft on intruder missions, becoming one of the most successful intruder pilots to date. There would be one more claim for him when at 0130hrs on 22 July 1941, he collided with a Wellington of 11 Operational Training Unit which was preparing to land at RAF Bassingbourne, both aircraft then crashing at Ashwell in Hertfordshire with the deaths of the three German and eight RAF aircrew.
There are only three other nights where Luftwaffe records specifically mention Do 17Z-10s shooting down RAF aircraft. The first was the night of 10/11 February 1941 when four aircraft, three of them flown by Hptm Rolf Jung, Oblt Albert Schulz and Lt Joahnnes Feuerbaum, were involved. The first claim was made by Oblt Schulz whose claim was optimistic and no losses can be attributed to his attack. Furthermore, he actually attacked RAF Coltishall where Spitfires of 222 Squadron and Hurricanes of 255 Squadron were carrying out night flying practice; 222 Squadron reported afterwards:
‘While night flying was in progress at about midnight, one enemy aircraft was seen by Sgt [Rainford] Marland to be making the circuit behind the aircraft flown by Sgt [Norman] Ramsay who was then fired upon. Sgt Marland made five separate attacks on this e/a which was identified as an Me 110. Shortly afterwards incendiary bombs were dropped and two hangars sustained slight damage. A second stick was dropped and it is believed that e/a was then intercepted by a Hurricane [Sgt Leslie Barnes of 257 Squadron] and chased out to sea.’
Hptm Jung, with his crew Uffz Theo Schürks and Uffz Herbert Thomas were the next to claim and reported:
‘Take-off at 2345hrs, landing at 0346hrs, over target area 0100–0300hrs. Observed four landing aircraft near illuminated airfield 10280. Own plane was detected too early. The lights of the airfield were switched off. Dropped 120 incendiary bombs on accommodation and hangars from 0100–0145hrs in three attacks from 500m altitude. Observed numerous persistent fires. Fired at fire brigade crews in six low-level attacks. Observed six landing aircraft at airfield 10242 at 0220hrs. Attacked an aircraft at 100m altitude, the navigation lights were immediately switched off, further pursuit was without any result. Shot down a Wellington near 10242 in 200m altitude at 0230 hrs. After two bursts of fire, the right engine burned and the plane exploded in the air. Despite the air combat there was well-aimed light anti-aircraft fire, six hits in own machine. Attacked a Bristol Blenheim with three bursts near Great Yarmouth at 800m altitude at 0300hrs.The Blenheim was shooting recognition signals (red-yellow).Hits and fire effect recognized perfectly. Further observation of the aircraft was not possible. Subsequent loss of the aircraft can be expected.’
The only loss than can be attributed was a Wellington from 115 Squadron and captained by Sgt Harry Rogers which was returning from an attack on Hannover. The pilot managed to crash-land at Narborough near Swaffham in Norfolk with just the rear gunner suffering injuries.
On the night of 7/8 April 1941, Lt Hans Feuerbaum almost got another victim while flying a Do 17Z-10 when he claimed a Hudson near Wells flown by Plt Off Charles Alexander DFM. On the way home Feuerbaum then claimed what he thought was a Hereford but was probably a Whitley of 51 Squadron flown by Plt Off Gordon Mattey which reported being attacked by a German aircraft 60 miles east of Flamborough Head, Mattey being slightly wounded in the action. Feuerbaum would claim just one more RAF aircraft on the early morning of 3 May but he was possibly flying a Ju 88C; even the crew of his intended victim, a Whitley of 77 Squadron flown by Sgt Mills, failed to recognize what their assailant was flying. Feuerbaum would live another one month and one day as he and his crew would be killed on 4 June near Whitby in Yorkshire when their Ju 88C-2 flew into the ground in bad weather.
The final kill that can be attributed to a Do 17Z-10 intruder went to recently promoted Fw Vincenz Giessübel who shot down an 11 Operational Training Unit Wellington over RAF Bassingbourne at 0050hrs on 24 April1941 and which then crashed onto and destroyed a second Wellington. It was Giessübel's 37th operational flight of the war and he would continue to fly the Do 17Z-10 with 2./NJG 2 on another 33 operational flights, failing to increase his score, his last operational flight being on 13 October 1941, after which he only flew the Ju 88C-4.
Do 17Z-10 losses were understandably light due to the small numbers involved and around 13 October 1941, intruder missions ceased by order of the Führer who wanted to see RAF bombers burning on German territory rather than British airfields. On 13 October 1940, Do 17Z-10 coded R4+DK crashed on landing at Gilze-Rijen injuring Uffz Erich Götz and two crew. Then on 9 November 1940, Ofw Herbert Schmidt flying R4+HK was damaged by Flak on an intruder sortie and crash-landed at Gilze-Rijen. Finally on 5 February 1941, Oblt Otto Hauser's R4+BK went missing on an intruder sortie. The second and last combat loss which also saw the last Do 17 to crash on British soil during the war came on 8 May 1941 when Fw Wilhelm Lettenmeier's Werk Nummer 2843 coded R4+GK was intercepted by a Beaufighter of 25 Squadron flown by Plt Off David Thompson with radar operator Plt Off Leslie Britain; initially the British crew had difficulty getting behind the German aircraft due to its low speed:
‘I throttled back which caused exhaust flames to appear from our aircraft which was up moon of the Dornier which apparently sighted the Beaufighter and immediately made a steep turn to port in an attempt to evade and did evade the first burst of one second which I fired attacking on the starboard beam at a range of 100yds. I followed the Dornier which continued on a straight course after making the steep turn to port giving me the impression that the pilot of the Dornier thought he had succeeded in evading me. I followed him and fired two further one second bursts at about 100yds range from below and to starboard and I saw hits from the first burst and after the second burst the port motor of the Dornier caught on fire.’
Flight engineer Uffz Herbert Thomas recalls what happened next:
‘There was an awful crash and grinding noise and the port engine began to burn brightly. The noise was terrific. My first reaction was to get the canopy clear, close the fuel tap, cut the ignition, cut everything. I went to help Lettenmeier but our Dornier simply went down. The fire closed on the cockpit and together we gave the command to get out. Tracers went under me and the Bola [gondola] but I could not find the switch for the bale out buzzer so with a great effort I forced open the hatch against the airstream. I climbed onto the radio operator's position and to my surprise found that Georg [Uffz Herden] was still at his post. I screamed at him to jump and together we got out.’
Both survived but the pilot was killed (sadly David Thompson would be killed in a flying accident 8 July 1941). Do 17 crashed at West Fen, Medlam Drain, Carrington in Lincolnshire and hit the ground at high speed, exploded and caused a deep crater. The body of Wilhelm Lettenmeier was found 100yds away with an unopened parachute. Despite being the first (and last) Z-10 to crash on land, all that the RAF could find of note was a plate stating the aircraft had been made by Dornier at Friedrichshafen, traces of machine guns were found as well as a single 15mm round and that it had been carrying 1kg incendiaries.
Although the Do 17Z-10 soldiered on, it was soon replaced by more adept nightfighters, namely the Bf 110, Ju 88C-4 and even the Do 215 B-5. The last recorded incident involving a Do 17Z-10 came on 19 September 1941 an aircraft of 2./NJG 2 suffered an undercarriage collapse at Gilze-Rijen.
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