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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 30 юли 2019, 18:02

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1. Gaslands: Refuelled Chop Shop Challenge - Phil's Truck - 2019-07-30 07:56:03
Gaslands: Refuelled comes out in September, but here at Osprey Games HQ we couldn't wait. And so, without further ado, please let us introduce the Gaslands: Refuelled Chop Shop Challenge. Over the next few weeks we are going to be showing off our Gaslands creations, and we invite you all to do the same! If you want to show off your cars simply email us at https://ospreypublishing.com/info@ospreygames.co.uk?subject=gaslands%20refuelled%20chop%20shop%20challenge and include 'Chop Shop Challenge' in the subject, and we'll include it in our upcoming gallery of Gaslands awesomness! You can also share your creations on Twitter - just make sure you include #chopshopchallenge in your tweet!
We're starting off with a look at Phil's truck. This article was originally posted on his blog.
With the release of Gaslands: Refuelled just around the corner, the Osprey Games office is once again full of Hot Wheels cars, random components scavenged from various sources, and the smell of superglue. A challenge was leveled - build a Gaslands car from the selection that was already to hand. That was it. No rules, no prizes. It really should take more than this to spur our competitive streaks into full flight...

Well, I think my car is the first one finished, so I win on that score if no other...
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The underlying vehicle is a Hot Wheels Solid Muscle, which is described by the Hot Wheels Wiki as "a futuristic flatbed truck with what appears to be two nitrous tanks in the rear. The model has an adjustable front splitter."

First things first, the front splitter was rendered non-adjustable with the judicious application of superglue, as were the wheels. While Gaslands is really designed to be played with cars not mounted on bases, I prefer the look of based models and found some the perfect size from Renedra - just a little longer and wider than the car itself, but not so much that it interferes with measurements etc.

So, with the car in hand, I needed to figure out how to stat it up for Gaslands. It's obviously a truck of some kind, so I started with the Truck statline. This gave me a starting cost of 15 and 3 build slots to accommodate larger gear. The two tanks in the back of the truck are already intended to represent a nitrous system, but I don't really see myself (or a truck, for that matter) speeding to victory - gutting out a win by immobilizing the opposition is more my style. Flicking through the available weaponry, I lit up the Napalm Dropper... which does exactly what you'd expect. this is a pretty inexpensive, yet fun option that takes up 1 build slot. With one dropped weapon already equipped, I thought of Verney - a sponsor that specialises in dropped weapons. It's a perfect combination, and I furthered that synergy by adding a second dropped weapon - the Oil Slick Dropper (pricier than the Napalm Dropper, but 'free' in terms of build points). There are also two large exhausts on the Solid Muscle, presumably also for the nitrous system, but these take little effort to reinterpret as some form of weapon port.

At this stage, I had a decent rear-facing arsenal, and reckoned I could do with adding something to make me as dangerous to the vehicles ahead of me. Machine Guns are always a good option, so I took a couple of forward-facing ones to fill out the build point allowance. I could have spent a lot more time finessing and juggling different weapon options, but I wanted to skip to my favourite part of any project - kitbashing!

The long, flat roof of the cab looked perfect for the machine guns, so I raided my bitz box and found a couple of MG42s from Warlord Games' Bolt Action plastics. Clip off the stock, pistol grip, and that was it. I did consider mounting them on the bonnet, tucking them against the ridge, but I couldn't shake the impression that they looked to be shooting slightly downhill (the bonnet slopes very slightly) and the roof mounting offers a more interesting silhouette. I also found a random bit of plastic (maybe spare tank tracks? Ammo cases?) and glued it up against the exhausts to represent the Oil Slick Dropper.
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That done, the vehicle was pretty much ready to go, but I thought it needed just a little something extra. I snaffled a load of jerry cans (another Bolt Action find), and mounted them against the rear of the cab. It makes very little sense to store petrol right next to a napalm-based weapon, but, then again, it makes very little sense to engage in high speed death races...
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The painting was a doddle - grey basecoat, drybrush the edges with metal, then drybrush the lower areas with brown. Pick out the jerry cans in green, the napalm tanks in yellow (I considered the classic black-and-yellow stripes, but it was just a little more awkward than I cared for!), and a stray cable in red, then an all-over brown wash, and jobs's a good'un.
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One touch I added, just to bring a splash more colour to the vehicle, was a smear of blood across the bonnet. It doesn't really fit with a game of Gaslands, but it does lift the generally dark vehicle a bit. I haven't done anything with sponsor logos or numbers or anything - it would look better with something along those lines, but I don't have any bright ideas right now. Something to return to, perhaps.

So the final vehicle looks like this:

Dusty Roads Sponsor Verney Vehicle Type Special Rules Cost Build Slots Truck - 15 3 Weapons Cost Build Slots Handguns - - Machine Gun (front-facing) 2 1 Machine Gun (front-facing) 2 1 Napalm Dropper (rear-facing) 1 1 Oil Slick Dropper (rear-facing) 2 - Upgrades Cost Build Slots - - - Perks Technology & Built Cost Total Cost Trunk of Junk - 22 Tombstone - That’s Entertainment -

I've not spent any points on additional perks, but coming in at 22 points, it gives me a bit of leeway on that score if I want to improve this vehicle or invest in a more expensive teammate.

Coming up with a name for the vehicle was the hardest part! The theme for this team will be motoring puns based on the names of old-school professional wrestlers. This truck is named for the late Dusty Rhodes, 'The American Dream':
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Hmmm... I might need to go back and add some polka-dots. Future vehicles for this team might include: The Macho Van, Harley Racer or 'Chassis' Freddie Blassie. Other suggestions welcomed (but no prizes for Diesel, Blacktop Bully, or Thurman 'Sparky' Plugg...).
Gaslands: Refuelled comes out on 19 September. Preorder your copy today!


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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 31 юли 2019, 12:00

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1. Държавен вестник обнародва договорите по сделката за F-16 - 2019-07-30 20:46:46
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В броя от днес, 30 юли 2019 г., на Държавен вестник са обнародвани договорите и споразуменията по сделката за покупка на осем изтребителя F-16 Block 70. Указите за обнародване са подписани от президента Румен Радев.


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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 01 авг 2019, 12:00

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1. Заради беларуския ремонт на Су-25 Народното събрание прие законови промени - 2019-07-31 19:10:10
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Чрез законови промени в последния момент, Народното събрание даде възможността МО само да си издава разрешения за експорт на въоръжение, като по такъв начин се преодолява патовата ситуация около ремонта на Су-25 в Беларус. Това стана днес, 31 юли 2019 г.


2. Премиерът Борисов похвали министрите си за сделката за F-16 - 2019-07-31 14:08:25
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Министър-председателят Бойко Борисов похвали министрите си за сделката за покупката на F-16 и не пропусна да се самопохвали с поздравите, които получи от Държавния департамент на САЩ. Това стана днес, 31 юли 2019 г., преди редовното заседание на Министерски съвет.


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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 01 авг 2019, 18:00

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1. August's Book Vote and Last Month's Results - 2019-08-01 07:57:00
This month the book vote looks at the Combat series, with five new books competing for your vote. From sieges during the Korean War to operations in early 21st-century Iraq, this month's vote covers a wide range of events. Read more about the full list of options below and cast your vote by clicking on the link below!
Plus, keep reading for the results of last month's Campaign book vote.
CBT: US Soldier vs Chinese Soldier
CBT: Indian Soldier vs Pakistani Soldier
CBT: Iranian Soldier vs Iraqi Soldier
CBT: British Royal Marine vs Argentine Soldier
CBT: US Marine vs Iraqi Insurgent


US Soldier vs Chinese Soldier: Korea 1950–51
In November 1950, US troops first clashed with Chinese forces during the bloody struggle for victory in the Korean War, as Chinese troops strove to push back the United Nations forces that had repelled the North Korean invasion of South Korea. The savage winter conditions would test both sides to the limit, with sustained Chinese pressure compelling the US forces and their allies to retreat before the line could be stabilized.

Indian Soldier vs Pakistani Soldier: Indo-Pakistani Wars 1965–71
In 1965 and again in 1971, Indian and Pakistani forces fought one another in two sharp military clashes that redrew the map of South Asia and set the tone for decades of confrontation between the two countries. While the 17-day conflict in 1965 was prompted by the long-running dispute over Jammu and Kashmir, the 13-day war of 1971 arose following Bangladeshi efforts to become independent of Pakistan.

Iranian Soldier vs Iraqi Soldier: Iran–Iraq War 1980–88
The Iran-Iraq War was sparked when Iraq invaded Iran in September 1980, hoping to profit from the upheaval in that country following the 1979 Islamic Revolution. In the event, despite widespread international support, the Iraqis found that their initial territorial gains were mostly recovered by Iranian forces, which mounted a series of offensives until the war ended in a ceasefire in August 1988, after some 500,000 military personnel had lost their lives.

British Royal Marine vs Argentine Soldier: Falklands 1982
Following the Argentine landings on the Falkland Islands in April 1982, the Royal Marines of 3 Commando Brigade were deployed to the South Atlantic alongside other elements of the British armed forces to take the islands back, playing a crucial role in the subsequent fighting. Their Argentine opponents, many of whom were conscripts, experienced shortcomings in both equipment and training; both sides would find that the bleak conditions challenged them to the limit.

US Marine vs Iraqi Insurgent: Fallujah 2004
In March 2004, in the wake of the 2003 Coalition invasion of Iraq, insurgents in Fallujah killed four private military contractors, prompting Coalition commanders to launch a major counterinsurgency campaign – Operation Vigilant Resolve – in the city. A major escalation in local hostilities ensured, with US forces withdrawing from Fallujah in May. A subsequent Coalition effort in November–December 2004 – Operation Phantom Fury – involved some of the heaviest urban combat experienced by US forces since the Vietnam War, as US Marines and others confronted the insurgents in this ancient Iraqi city.

Make your vote by clicking here!
Last month we asked you what would you like to see published in our Campaign series. Thank you to everyone who voted and provided feedback, the full results are listed below! CAM: The Prussian Crusade 1217–74 24.5% CAM: The East African Campaign 1914-18 26.4% CAM: The Gothic Line 1944–45 19.1% CAM: The Battle of Hue 1968 13.1% CAM: The Soviet–Afghan War 1979–89 16.9%
Did your favourite win? Which Combat title did you vote for? Let us know in the comments


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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 02 авг 2019, 18:00

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1. Designer Diary - Creating Undaunted: Normandy - 2019-08-02 09:23:04
On the blog today David Thompson, one of the designers behind Undaunted: Normandy, takes us through the design process of his upcoming deck-building game of World War II combat, from the initial concept and Grandfather's influence through to the final finished game.

The Initial Concept

In 2014, I moved from the U.S. to the UK. Just before the move, I started brainstorming the idea of combining elements of deck-building card games with the spatial elements of a board game. I knew I wanted the game to be a skirmish-level game, with the cards tied directly to counters on the board, but I wasn't sure what the exact theme would be. While I was working through some of the initial mechanical concepts, I went on my first vacation after the move — a visit to Normandy. My first stop was Omaha Beach, where my grandfather landed on D-Day +4 with the 30th Infantry Division.

Instantly I had my theme. The game would focus on the exploits of individual rifle platoons within the 30th Infantry Division as they made their way through France.



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My son and me at Omaha Beach

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My grandfather


As SPIEL 2014, one of the largest gaming shows in the world, neared, I shared some of the initial design concepts for Undaunted on BoardGameGeek. A user there — Eddy Sterckx — noticed the game and suggested Osprey would be a good fit for the design. Eddy reached out to Duncan Molloy at Osprey and set up a virtual introduction. I met Duncan in Essen and pitched the game to him. At the time, Duncan was just getting things going with Osprey's fledging board game division. He liked the design, but it was a while before he had the bandwidth to take the game on. As a matter of fact, it wasn't until SPIEL 2017 that we made the formal agreement.

Regardless, when I headed home from SPIEL 2014, I had a good feeling about the design. I had already conceived the campaign arc for the game — the 30th ID's actions in France following D-Day — and I had also sketched out some ideas for the first few scenarios, but to properly develop the scenarios and ensure the game was solid, I needed two things: a dedicated blind playtest community, and someone to help me develop the scenarios.

Calling in Reinforcements

The blind playtest community emerged primarily from two places: BoardGameGeek and a dedicated playtest page that I created on my website. Blind playtest reports began pouring in. Although some contained feedback on the core of the game, most of the reports provided invaluable insight about the scenarios that were being developed.

At the same time, I reached out to Trevor Benjamin. He and I had collaborated on other projects and developed a great relationship. It also helped that we were both part of a game designer and playtest group in Cambridge. While I thought the majority of our effort would be solely dedicated to scenario development, Trevor brought with him a fresh perspective and fantastic ideas for improvements to the core of the game.



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Trevor and I playtest Undaunted: Normandy at UK Game Expo 2015


Gameplay vs. Simulation

One challenge we had throughout the design process was the balance we wanted to strike between gameplay elegance and simulationism. We knew we wanted the game to be quick playing, and we wanted to rely on the overall deck-building mechanism and the multi-use cards to drive the action, while representing concepts like command and control and fog of war.

We debated more than once whether there should be terrain effects to include impact on line of sight. Ultimately we decided that the drawbacks outweighed the benefits. For example, if we said that river tiles prevented or hindered movement, what about woods or hills? Depending on the river's depth or width, it could actually be easier to cross than a hill would be to climb. If we introduced line of sight, we'd have to determine how it was drawn, add edge cases, etc. It was a slippery slope, with every one of these elements taking us further from what we wanted: an elegant design that centered on players' control of their platoons through the management of their decks, abstracting their command and control over the platoon.



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The components for Undaunted: Normandy


From Design to Development

Trevor and I turned over the design to Osprey in 2017. At that point, Duncan Molloy and Filip Hartelius (who has served as the lead designer for the game) began putting the game through its paces. Although there were few changes to the core rules, Filip and Duncan pushed us to improve some elements and polish the edges.

More than anything, though, they challenged us on some of the scenarios. They wanted to make sure that each and every scenario was as good as it could possibly be. Ultimately we had to strip out a few of the weaker scenarios, we improved many that we had already designed, and we added a few new ones.

The Game Comes to Life

By early 2019, the design and development was complete. We began seeing Roland MacDonald's beautiful artwork, which really made the game come to life. When our preview copies arrived in June, we could hardly believe that the game had become a reality.

So that's the story of how Undaunted: Normandy came to be. You can take a look at the rules in this video from Watch it Played, and over the next couple of weeks we'll post more articles about how we modeled the rifle platoon in the game and how we based the game's scenarios on real world battles.


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Undaunted: Normandy comes out on 22 August. Preorder your copy today!


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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 03 авг 2019, 12:00

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1. Курсанти с първи самостоятелен полет - 2019-08-02 18:47:49
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Първокурсниците от факултет „Авиационен” на НВУ „Васил Левски” изпълниха първия си самостоятелен полет. Това съобщават от Военновъздушна учебна база „Георги Бенковски”.


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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 07 авг 2019, 12:00

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1. САЩ поемат $46 до 60 млн. от цената на българските F-16 - 2019-08-06 14:30:49
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Съединените щати ще поемат между $45 и 60 млн. от цената за придобиване на осемте изтребителя F-16, но детайлите по тази военна помощ остават неясни. Това се разбра от думите на временно управляващия посолството на САЩ у нас Джъстин Фридман, по време на пресконференция проведена днес, 6 август 2019 г.


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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 07 авг 2019, 18:00

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1. Operation 'Accolade' - 2019-08-07 09:21:00
In today's blog post, Anthony Rogers looks at Operation Accolade and the process of researching and writing his book Kos and Leros 1943.


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Accolade remains one of the lesser-known British military operations of World War II, an ambitious undertaking by Winston Churchill to occupy the Dodecanese with the cooperation of co-belligerent Italian forces. It would end in abject failure. By autumn 1943 the war was beginning to turn against the Wehrmacht and an Allied defeat was best forgotten. It would have been very different had Accolade been a success.
Churchill had argued forcefully about the merits of opening a new front in the eastern Aegean. Besides adding to the difficulties of an already overstretched Wehrmacht, such a development, it was hoped, might even convince neutral Turkey to join the Allies. The Americans were less than enthusiastic, however, and considered Accolade as an unnecessary diversion. The operation, therefore, would be an almost entirely British affair. As a prerequisite, it was understood from the outset that Rhodes had to be taken together with its all-important airfields. But in response to the anticipated Italian armistice of September 1943, German forces pre-empted the British by moving against their erstwhile allies and seizing Rhodes. Churchill was undeterred and British forces were instead dispatched to other islands, including Kos and Leros. Adolf Hitler could hardly ignore a British presence in the eastern Aegean. For one thing, the German war effort was reliant on exports from Greece, a valuable source of ore, including chrome (used in armoured steel production) and bauxite (from which aluminium was extracted). Furthermore, if Allied air bases were established in the region, the important Ploesti oilfields in Romania would be within easy reach of bombers and long-range fighters. Units of the German 22. Infanteriedivision together with other specialist formations were therefore tasked with dealing with the problem. For more than two months German and British-led forces clashed at sea, in the air and on the ground.

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Kos: 3 October 1943
Both sides employed infantry as well as ‘elite’ units. British land forces included a company of the Parachute Regiment and elements of the Long Range Desert Group (LRDG) and Special Boat Squadron (SBS). The Germans made good use of paratroopers, including a company of the Division Brandenburg. But success on the ground was dependent on air support and unfortunately for the British the air belonged to the Luftwaffe. For Churchill, the Aegean was an ignominious defeat, providing Hitler with his last enduring victory and leaving German forces in occupation of key islands until the end of the war in Europe.
Writing about the 1943 war in the Aegean was challenging. When I began my research, few authors had tackled the subject. I quickly realised there was scope for an in-depth account drawing on both British and German primary sources. I had another reason to focus on Kos and Leros. Having a Maltese mother, I had a keen interest in Malta’s history, the war years in particular. At the height of the battle for Malta, in 1942, there were 11 British infantry battalions on the island. Of these, 4th Battalion The Royal East Kent Regiment (The Buffs) was later deployed to the Aegean together with 234 Infantry Brigade, comprising 1st Battalion The Durham Light Infantry, 2nd Battalion The Royal Irish Fusiliers (Faughs) and 2nd Battalion The Queen’s Own Royal West Kent Regiment. Additional to the ex-Malta contingent was 1st Battalion The King’s Own Royal Regiment (Lancaster). 1 DLI was sent to Kos; the remainder were tasked with defending Leros. All five battalions were effectively wiped out. Their story deserved to be told.
For two years, I would spend five or six days a week researching original documents at the Public Record Office (today The National Archives). I discovered additional material at the Imperial War Museum and elsewhere. From Berlin, author Peter Schenk provided wartime German records and reports, all of which needed to be translated into English – a daunting task. Producing English-language transcripts took a year or so and this was entirely due to the hard work of Sonja Stammwitz, a superb translator. In addition, Sonja interviewed German veterans. Slowly, but surely, my work began to take shape.
I travelled to the Aegean several times and spent many days exploring, retracing the steps of those who had fought in the region decades before. Familiarising oneself with the terrain is vital to understanding a battle. I first visited Leros in 2000. It was forbidden at that time to venture too close to military areas, but with local assistance I was able to gain access to what had been key features during the battle, including the heights of Clidi and Meraviglia. Clidi is still a restricted zone, but it has since become possible to freely explore Meraviglia – location in November 1943 of Fortress Headquarters. In the nearly 20 years since my first visit much has changed. Rachi, an elevated ridge running across the narrow central part of the island, was fought over time and again. In 2000 one could walk from one end to the other. But Rachi has since become popular with those seeking to build a house with a view, transforming the landscape forever. Nevertheless, much of the countryside remains unspoilt, including that surrounding Clidi and the slopes of Appetici, another important height.
Churchill’s Folly was my first book about the Aegean war and is a comprehensive account, much of it related in the words of those who were there. Kos and Leros 1943 is an adaptation of my original work and includes a series of maps explaining the day-to-day progress of the fighting on Kos, Levitha and Leros. There are limited wartime situation maps and these tend to vary in quality. So it was necessary to cross-reference what was available with information in after-action reports, personal diaries and other first-hand accounts. Map references of British field graves on Leros enabled me to determine more precisely troop movements and limits of advance. The maps, therefore, are as accurate as can be expected. The ‘Bird’s Eye View’ of Meraviglia is particularly impressive, and an accurate interpretation of a 1943 Luftwaffe aerial image.
Finding images presented a problem that was overcome when veterans or their families provided photographs. I also discovered long-forgotten images at the Bundesarchiv in Koblenz. Nearly all are German photographs. The reason for this is simple. German servicemen often owned their own camera, which they freely used. Most British servicemen, on the other hand, did not, and those who did were restricted in what they could photograph. Photographs of Allied ground forces in the Dodecanese in 1943 are extremely scarce, and seem to derive mainly from those who were in the LRDG and SBS. There was also one army war photographer on Leros who had arrived with a civilian war correspondent, Leonard Marsland Gander. Gander escaped just before Leros fell. The photographer, Sergeant Wood, had to stay. With the exception of a few images now at the Imperial War Museum, whatever photographs he took were lost.
Putting together Kos and Leros 1943 was an interesting and enjoyable experience. I do hope readers are pleased with the result.
To find out more, pre-order your copy of Kos and Leros 1943.


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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 08 авг 2019, 18:00

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1. Gaslands: Refuelled Chop Shop Challenge - Pete's Van - 2019-08-08 08:40:44
Gaslands: Refuelled comes out in September, but here at Osprey Games HQ we couldn't wait. And so, without further ado, please let us introduce the Gaslands: Refuelled Chop Shop Challenge. Over the next few weeks we are going to be showing off our Gaslands creations, and we invite you all to do the same! If you want to show off your cars simply email us at https://ospreypublishing.com/info@ospreygames.co.uk?subject=gaslands%20refuelled%20chop%20shop%20challenge and include 'Chop Shop Challenge' in the subject, and we'll include it in our upcoming gallery of Gaslands awesomness! You can also share your creations on Twitter - just make sure you include #chopshopchallenge in your tweet!
For the past couple of weeks I’ve had a beat-up old toy van on my desk at home, a charity shop find that seemed perfect for Gaslands. The Gaslands: Refuelled Chop Shop Challenge gave me the motivation to get to work, and Phil’s speedy creation of his truck really made me crack on. So here is my first creation as we prepare for the release of Gaslands: Refuelled.



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Straight off the bat, I wanted to pair the blocky, pragmatic design of the van with some cutting-edge weaponry, with the idea being that the car was created by technophiles who blew their entire budget on fancy weapons and gizmos and had to just grab whatever vehicle they could find at the junkyard. Reaching into my bits box, I found some weaponry and additions that looked like they fit the bill perfectly, as well as a spare bit of wire to connect things up.


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In terms of a colour scheme, I wanted to keep things bright so that the van stands out on the track. I’d tried the orange and turquoise colour scheme on some other miniatures to mixed results, but figured I’d bust it out again and see how it looks. I’m pretty happy with it – needs a bit of neatening up and something to go on the right side to break up the wall of orange, but I don’t have any ideas for that yet.

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Truth be told, I got a little caught up in putting my vehicle together, and hadn’t given too much thought to who the sponsor should be. After looking through the options I’m going to go with Mishkin:
Andre Mishkin is not a natural sportsman. However, the brilliant Russian engineer and inventor proved in 2010 that technology is just as solid an answer as skill or ferocity on the track. From his research and development facility on Mars he continues to send designs for unusual and devastating weapons and sleek, hi-tech vehicles to Earth for field-testing by the teams he sponsors.
Clearly it wasn’t built by Andre himself. Perhaps a disgruntled group of sub-par engineers who didn’t quite cut the mustard, or a group of hopefuls hoping to impress the Russian engineer and secure positions at his research and development facility.
Given the predominantly orange colour scheme, I went with the name Sunny V, but am open to suggestions! Sunny V Sponsor Mishkin Vehicle Type Special Rules Cost Build Slots Truck - 15 3 Weapons Cost Build Slots Handguns - - Arc Lightning Projector (front facing) 6 2 Sentry Gun (dropped) 3 - Upgrades Cost Build Slots Experimental Nuclear Engine 5 1 Perks Technology & Military Cost Total Cost Dynamo - 29 All the Toys - Thumpermonkey -
Thank you to everyone who has sent their creations in so far! We'll put a gallery together in a couple of weeks so that you can see them in all their glory, https://ospreypublishing.com/info@ospreygames.co.uk?subject=gaslands%20refuelled%20chop%20shop%20challenge!
Gaslands: Refuelled comes out on 19 September. Preorder your copy today!


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1. Osprey's Big Reveal: Elite - 2019-08-09 11:23:00
ELI ??? ??? ??? ??? ??? ??? ??? ??? ??? ??? ??? ???
To navigate your way through the Big Reveal please use the links in the bar above.
Every August, we unveil what's coming to Osprey in the following year. This year, we kick off the Big Reveal with the Elite series. Let us know which of these books are you most intrigued by.

ELI: Roman Standards & Standard-Bearers (2)
The Late Roman Empire was a period of significant change in the designs of standards and in the costumes of standard-bearers. During the middle decades of the chaotic 3rd century, evidence confirms the continued use of the old legionary eagle and the signa of the old cohorts and centuries, alongside flags and Imperial images. The two major trends over the later generations were the adoption of Christian symbols on standards (e.g. Constantine the Great's Chi-Rho), and the proliferation of different types of flags. This had begun in the late 2nd century with the adoption of the 'barbarian' dragon standard, the windsock-shaped draco, which continued to be displayed alongside various other flags in the Greek-speaking Eastern Empire, whose influence increased greatly. Meanwhile, the growing employment of foreign units was such that by the 5th century we have evidence of the use of Hunnic symbolism among a Roman general's suite of standards. The costumes of standard-bearers also evolved as 'Persian' styles spread from Constantinople.

ELI: World War II US Fast Carrier Task Force Tactics
World War II US Fast Carrier Task Force Tactics concentrates on how the highly successful Task Forces 50, 58 and 38 actually operated: their composition in ships, aircraft and men; the essential technology at their disposal; the evolving doctrine for their employment; the opposition and dangers they faced; and how they overcame them at the tactical level. It explains in straightforward terms the intricate details of topics such as how ships manoeuvred, how aircraft were deployed and recovered, the formations and approaches used by fighters, dive-bombers and torpedo-bombers against naval and land targets, and how Task Forces defended themselves.

ELI: Soviet Airborne Forces 1930–91
With its first airborne brigade established in 1932, the Vozdushno-desantnye voyska (‘air-landing forces’, or VDV) of the Red Army led the way in airborne doctrine and practice. Though they were initially handicapped by a lack of infrastructure, due in part to a turbulent political climate in the 1930s, they still conducted major drops during World War II, including at the Dnepr River in September 1943.
After the war ended, the VDV became independent of the Air Force and were elevated to the role of strategic asset. The newly rebuilt divisions were now organized and trained to conduct deep insertions behind enemy lines, attacking command-and-control facilities, lines of communication, and key infrastructure targets such as nuclear power plants. This training came into play in numerous Cold War confrontations, including Soviet operations in Hungary (1956) and Czechoslovakia (1968). During the Soviet war in Afghanistan (1979–89), the VDV proved to be the most formidable of the Mujahideen’s opponents, with the development of the air assault concept – the transport, insertion and support of air-landed troops by helicopter rather than parachute.

ELI: Roman Shields
The introduction of the scutum in the 4th century BC revolutionized the way the Romans fought. Instead of being purely defensive, the shield became a weapon in its own right. Using the top edge or boss to punch an opponent, or the lower rim to smash down on their feet, it served to unbalance an enemy and allow the sword to do its work. The versatility of the scutum was characterized by the testudo, a formation the Romans used offensively like a pedestrian tank. Meanwhile, other shield types equipped the auxiliaries who fought alongside the legionaries. The curved, rectangular scutum survived into the 3rd century AD, only to be replaced by an oval, slightly domed shield derived from the oval shields of Early Imperial auxiliaries.

ELI: Hitler's Eastern Legions 1941–45
Between 1941–45, the Germans recruited around 175,000 men from a number of minorities in the USSR, distinguishing between 'Turkomans' (predominantly Muslims) and 'Caucasians' (predominantly Orthodox Christians). Of these, many formed rear-area auxiliary units, but at least 55,000 were combat troops. The first recruits formed two battalions in the 444th Security Division raised as early as November 1941; during 1942–43 seven legions were formed, each of several battalions, eventually totalling some 53 battalions (equivalent to about 6 full divisions). However, with one exception (162nd Turkoman Division), they were not deployed as whole formations; after training in Poland, individual battalions were posted to fill out German regiments in the front lines, at first in Army Group South but later in all three Army Groups fighting on the Eastern Front. Units were also sent to Yugoslavia, Italy and the Western Front.

ELI: Vietnam War Booby Traps
The Vietnam War was the first conflict in which booby traps played a predominant role. Unable in most instances to hold their own in standup fights against US, ARVN, Korean, and Australian forces which were superior in strength, firepower, mobility, and logistics, the Viet Cong relied on traditional guerrilla warfare tactics. Employing small-scale hit-and-run attacks, ambushes, terrorist actions, and precision attacks against bases during which they controlled the surrounding area, the Viet Cong favored means that allowed them to avoid direct enemy contact. These included one of the oldest of guerrilla weapons, booby traps.
The VC were also adept at making booby traps ‘invisible’ in the jungle, plains, mountains, and swamps. They not only did a superior job of hiding booby traps and their means of triggering, but also emplaced them in locations and surroundings totally unexpected by Free World forces. Booby traps could be incredibly simple or startlingly complex and ingenious, ranging from pointed sticks to command-detonated submerged floating river mines. Besides a wide variety of booby traps they also used land and water mines, both contact/pressure-detonated and command-detonated. The use, types, triggering means, camouflage, distribution, and other factors involving booby traps were constantly changing, forcing Free World forces to be constantly on guard and tensely alert. There was little second guessing of the ingenious enemy. Free World forces published a great many manuals, lessons learned reports, and studies on booby traps and mines to keep pace with the constant changes and innovations.

ELI: Roman Heavy Cavalry (2)
In the twilight of the Western Roman Empire in the 5th–6th centuries the elite of the field armies was the heavy armoured cavalry. Since this category of troops had originally been copied from oriental models in Persia and on the Black Sea steppes, it was natural that they played a major role in the Eastern Empire. After the fall of the West, the Greek-speaking Eastern or Byzantine Empire survived for nearly a thousand years; cavalry was always predominant in its armies, and the heaviest armoured regiments continued to provide the ultimate shock-force in battle. The heavy units included the regiments of the Tagmata (the central imperial force based around Constantinople) and provincial units raised from the populations of the Themata or army corps districts throughout the Empire. By the 11th century, the latter were increasingly being replaced with mercenaries, as provincial governors became semi-independent and often rebellious warlords. Disunity contributed to the Empire's disastrous defeat by the Turks at Manzikert in 1071; thereafter the shrunken Empire still relied heavily on cavalry, since its field armies had to be mobile to meet the many threats to the frontiers.


2. Bolt Action: Korea - Exploring the History: Part 1 - 2019-08-09 10:41:45
Later this month, the Bolt Action series will expand from its World War II roots to a new, and truly modern, conflict with the publication of Bolt Action: Korea. The book contains all the selectors, scenarios, special rules, and new units required to wargame this turbulent period of world history.
To help you prepare for this upcoming addition to the series, we're delving into the history of the Korean War, starting with an extract from Campaign 162: Inch’on 1950 by Gordon L. Rottman, accompanied by a fantastic piece of artwork from Peter Dennis. Dog Company pinned down, outskirts of Seoul, September 26 1950.

Изображение

On the morning of September 26, three US marine, the KMC, a US Army, and an ROK regiment closed in on Seoul from the northwest, west, southwest, and south. To spearhead the 7th Marines’ advance, D/7 under Capt Richard R. Breen, was sent southwest on the Seoul–Kaesong Highway to secure the Sodaeman Prison on the northwest edge of the city. As D/7 approached Seoul between the steep slopes of Hill 296 on the right and Hill 338 on the left, they were greeted by cheering Koreans. The column was taken under fire from a water tower 400yd to the front and the civilians scattered. NKs then opened fire from the hillsides only 100yd away. The company deployed on both sides of the road returning fire, but was pinned down. The marines were unable to deploy flank security because of the civilian crowds. The company mortar section under 1stLt Paul P. Sartwell set up two 60mm mortars and immediately knocked out an enemy position. Totally exposed, the lieutenant directed the mortar fire and was hit three times before being put out of action. Two rifle platoons maneuvered to clear the slopes, but resistance was heavy. A tank-infantry relief force sent by the regiment was turned back. The company, faced with encirclement, all officers wounded, and casualties mounting, withdrew 1,000yd back up the road. The mortars delivered covering fire during the withdrawal. Carrying all of their dead and wounded, they established a perimeter on both sides of the road in the late afternoon. Before dark they received an airdrop of ammunition and supplies and prepared for a tough night. The NKs, though, contented themselves with remaining in their hill positions. The rest of the 2/7 was attacking eastward and the 3/7 also attacked east to secure a foothold on the north end of Hill 338. D/7 was relieved in the morning. Army and marine rifle companies were allocated an array of supporting weapons, but their distribution differed. A marine company had a machine-gun platoon of three sections, each with two squads armed with a Browning .30cal M1919A4 light machine gun. A section was generally allotted to each rifle platoon. Within the company headquarters was a mortar section with three 60mm M19 mortars. The marines concentrated 18 3.5-in. M20 bazookas in the battalion assault platoon, with two attached to each rifle platoon. Army rifle company weapons platoons had a mortar section with three 60mm mortars and a special weapons section with three 57mm M18 recoilless rifles (not used by the marines). Army rifle platoons had a weapons squad with a bazooka and an M1919A4 machine gun. The 60mm M19 mortar was the rifle company’s workhorse, its resident “artillery.” While artillery support was usually available, the benefit of the immediate fire that a company’s own mortars could provide was invaluable. The M19 was essentially the same as the M2 used in World War II, but was provided with a selector lever on the tube’s base plug allowing it to be drop-fired or trigger-fired. Some units deployed to Korea with the M2 and they were also issued to ROK units. Their ammunition was interchangeable with that of the Chinese 60mm Type 31. Ammunition included high explosive and white phosphorous smoke as well as illumination (parachute-suspended flares, not pictured). The maximum range was 1,985yd and its minimum was 50 yards.
To read more about the Inch'on campaign, pick up a copy of Campaign 162: Inch'on 1950 by Gordon L. Rottman.
For those of you interested in recreating the battles of the Korean war on your tabletop, preorder a copy of Bolt Action: Korea today.


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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 11 авг 2019, 18:00

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1. Osprey's Big Reveal: New Vanguard - 2019-08-11 11:23:00
ELI NVG ??? ??? ??? ??? ??? ??? ??? ??? ??? ??? ???
To navigate your way through the Big Reveal please use the links in the bar above.
Next up in the Big Reveal is our New Vanguard series, which examines the design, development, operation and history of the machinery of warfare. Check out the 2020 releases below and let us know in the comments which ones you are interested in.

NVG: American Privateers of the Revolutionary War During the American War of Independence (1775–83), Congress issued almost 800 letters of marque, as a way of combating Britain's overwhelming naval and mercantile superiority. At first, it was only fishermen and the skippers of small merchant ships who turned to privateering, with mixed results. Eventually though, American shipyards began to turn out specially-converted ships, while later still, the first purpose-built privateers entered the fray. These American privateers seized more than 600 British merchant ships over the course of the war, capturing thousands of British seamen. By the end of the war, some of the largest American privateers could venture as far as the British Isles, and were more powerful than most contemporary warships in the fledgling US Navy. A small number of Loyalist privateers also put to sea during the war, and preyed on the shipping of their rebel countrymen.

NVG: US Navy Cold War Guided Missile Cruisers
Faced with an increasingly formidable anti-ship cruise missile threat from the Soviet Union in the early days of the Cold War, and with the recent memory of the kamikaze threat from World War II, the USN placed a great priority on developing air defence cruise missiles and getting them to sea to protect the fleet. The first of these missiles were sizable, necessitating large ships to carry them and their sensors, which resulted in the conversion of a mix of heavy and light cruisers.
The cruisers served in the front lines of the Cold War and many saw combat service, engaging in surface actions from Vietnam to the Persian Gulf. Complementing the conventionally-powered missile cruisers was a much smaller number of expensive nuclear-powered cruisers, including the Long Beach, the USN’s largest-ever missile cruiser. Until replaced by the Ticonderoga and Burke classes of Aegis ships, the USN’s 38 missile cruisers were the most capable and important surface combatants in the fleet and served all over the globe during the Cold War.

NVG: World War II German Super-Heavy Siege Guns As the outbreak of World War II approached, Nazi Germany ordered artillery manufacturers Krupp and Rheimetall-Borsig to build several super-heavy siege guns, vital to smash through French and Belgian fortresses that stood in the way of the Blitzkrieg. These 'secret weapons' were much larger than the siege artillery of World War I and included the largest artillery piece of the war, the massive 80cm railway gun 'schwere Gustav' (Heavy Gustav). However, these complex and massive artillery pieces required years to build and test and, as war drew near, the German High Command hastily brought several WWI-era heavy artillery pieces back into service and then purchased, and later confiscated, a large number of Czech Skoda mortars. The new super siege guns began entering service in time for the invasion of Russia, notably participating in the attack on the fortress of Brest-Litovsk. Afterwards, when Germany was on the defensive in the second half of 1943, the utility of the guns was greatly diminished, and they were employed in a piecemeal and sporadic fashion on both the Eastern and Western Fronts.

NVG: Tanks in the Battle of the Bulge The Battle of the Bulge raises many questions which, until now, have not been adequately answered: How did the major tank types perform during the battle? What were the specific ‘lessons learned’ from the combat? And did these lessons result in changes to tanks in the subsequent months? Offering detailed answers to these questions, and many more, this book provides a survey of the principal tank and tank-equivalents (such as tank destroyers and Jagdpanzers) that took part in the Ardennes Campaign of December 1944–January 1945. Beginning with a basic overview of the campaign, accompanied by an order of battle of the major armoured units, it examines the opposing forces, covering the organization of the two tank forces to explain how they were deployed.

NVG: Combat Vehicles of Russia's Special Forces Vladimir Putin has devoted effort and funds into modernising Russia’s armed forces and turning them into an instrument geared not just for defending the Motherland but also projecting power beyond its borders, Russia has seen a growing emphasis on special and specialist forces.
Traditionally, the elite Spetsnaz commandos had to make do with regular vehicles or civilian-based ‘technicals’, not least to conceal their presence (or, indeed, very existence). Now, increasingly at the forefront of Russian power projection, the Spetsnaz are acquiring more capable, versatile vehicles, such as the paratroopers’ BTR-D personnel carrier, and also experimenting with exotic, specialist new acquisitions, such as the Chaborz M-3 buggy and Yamaha Grizzly all-terrain vehicle. The other elite branches of Russia’s forces, such as the Arctic-warfare troops of the 200th Independent Motor Rifle Brigade, the paratroopers of the Air Assault Troops (VDV), the Naval Infantry, and the elite units of the security forces are also developing and fielding new vehicles for their specialist roles, from combat snowmobiles to urban-warfare vehicles.

NVG: American Guided Missiles of World War II
World War II was a significant period of development for American missile programs, during which time the US built pioneering examples of guided weapons systems. However, whilst the German missiles of World War II are famous around the world, their American counterparts have remained shrouded in secrecy, despite the fact that they formed the basis for the later revolutions in precision warfare.

Among the most sophisticated missiles of World War II was the US Navy’s radar-guided Bat anti-ship missile, which was on the verge of deployment in the final months of the war. The war also saw the first use of guided assault drones, including the US Army Air Force’s Aphrodite program of 1944, and the US Navy’s Project Anvil and TDR-1.

NVG: The Royal Netherlands Navy of World War II
In the late 19th and early 20th century, a combination of coastal defence for the homeland and fleet defence for the East Indies became the established naval strategy for the Royal Dutch Navy and set the template for the world wars. Battleships were too expensive to build and maintain, so after World War I, there was significant investment in submarine development and construction. A handful of modern light cruisers and a new class of destroyers were also constructed during the interwar years to serve as a small Fleet-in-Being in the East Indies and to support the actions of the navy’s submarines. This beautifully illustrated book from a leading scholar on Dutch military history provides a comprehensive guide to the Royal Netherlands Navy of the World War II period, complete with detailed cutaways and battleplates of the fleet in action.

NVG: Soviet Armoured Cars 1936–45
The armoured car has an important place in the early history of Soviet armoured fighting vehicles (AFVs) – they were the most important AFV during the Russian Civil War and figured prominently in the mechanization of the Red Army that began in late 1929. The 1930s saw the development and production of a wide variety of armoured cars, which were used extensively in Soviet conflicts from then on. They saw service in the Spanish Civil War, in the 1939 Manchurian conflict with Japan, and in the occupation of the Baltic states and the invasion of Poland and Finland. Although many of its armoured cars were lost in the early months following the German invasion in June 1941, Russia continued with its armoured car development program, and the final model, the BA-64, was accepted for service in 1942 with over 9,000 built before production ended in 1946.

NVG: Soviet Cold War Attack Submarines
This book will cover nuclear-powered attack submarines built and operated by the Soviet Union in the Cold War. This includes the November class, which were the Soviet Union’s first nuclear submarines. The Alfa class were perhaps the most remarkable submarines of the Cold War: titanium-hulled, crewed with only thirty men due to considerable automation, 30% faster than any US submarines, and radically used a liquid lead-bismuth alloy in the reactor plant. The Victor class formed the backbone of the Soviet nuclear submarine fleet in the 1970s and 1980s, as hunter-killer submarines began to focus on tracking and potentially destroying NATO ballistic missile submarines. The Sierra classes were further titanium-hulled submarines and the single Mike class submarine was an experimental type containing a number of innovations. This submarine, the Komsolomets, was tragically lost at sea in 1989 due to an accidental fire, killing 42 of her crew. The Akula class were being constructed as the Cold War ended, and these boats form the mainstay of the Russian nuclear attack submarine fleet today.

NVG: French 75mm Gun
The “Soixante-quinze”, France’s legendary 75mm Modele 1897, was the first modern field gun. It pioneered several critical innovations in field artillery designs include a fast action breech and a soft recoil system. Although some of these features had been incorporated into earlier guns, the 75mm M1897 integrated them into a superior, lightweight field gun. The 75mm M1897 earned its reputation in the Great War, forming the backbone of French field artillery. It was widely exported after World War I around the globe. Due to its modernity and sound design, the 75mm remained in service well into World War II. It was used by the French, Polish, US and other armies during the late 1930s and early 1940s. The German army captured thousands of these in 1940 and used them for coastal defense. Surprisingly, many were converted into a very effective anti-tank gun, the PaK 97/38. These weapons lingered in service after World ar II, though by this time, they were largely obsolete.

NVG: US Navy Destroyer Escorts of World War II Destroyer escorts first went into production because the Royal Navy needed an escort warship larger than a corvette, but which could be built faster than a destroyer. They lacked the shipyards to build these types of ships in Britain, so they ordered them in the United States. Once the United States unexpectedly entered the war, its navy suddenly also needed more escort warships, so the destroyer escort was picked to fill the gap. Destroyer escorts were built in yards that did not exist prior to 1940, which were incapable of building destroyers, and were thrown up in rivers. These ships did yeoman service during World War II, fighting in both the Atlantic and Pacific, taking on both U-boat and Japanese submarines and serving as the early warning pickets against kamikazes later in the war. They soldiered on after World War II in both the United States Navy and a large number of navies throughout the world. This book would tell the story of these plucky ships, both during World War II and afterwards.


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1. МО е превело цялата сума по сделката за F-16 - 2019-08-12 20:36:45
Изображение
Министерството на отбраната е превело цялата сума в размер на $1,2 млрд. по международните договори за доставката от Правителството на САЩ на осем самолета F-16 Block 70 и свързаното с тях оборудване и въоръжение. Това съобщи военното ведомство днес, 12 август 2019 г.


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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 14 авг 2019, 18:00

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1. Osprey's Big Reveal: Combat Aircraft and X-Planes - 2019-08-14 11:23:00
ELI NVG COM/ XPL ??? ??? ??? ??? ??? ??? ??? ??? ??? ???
To navigate your way through the Big Reveal please use the links in the bar above.
Our next Big Reveal post looks to the sky with two of our Aviation series, Combat Aircraft and X-Planes. Take a look at the descriptions below and let us know which ones you'll be adding to your wishlist.

Combat Aircraft
COM: F-102 Delta Dagger Units
World War II saw the development of the heavy bomber as a decisive weapon. The addition of nuclear weapons to the bomber’s armament made it even more formidable, and by the late 1940s, US planners saw the growth of a Soviet nuclear-armed bomber fleet as a terrifying threat to North American security. Supersonic speed, long-range guided missiles and precise radar-based control of an interception became prerequisites for a new breed of fighters, beginning with the F-102.
A massive research and development effort produced the F-102A ‘1954 Fighter’, the J57 afterburning turbojet, its Hughes MX-1554 fire control system and, in due course, the Semi-Active Ground Environment (SAGE) radar and communications network that covered North America to guide its airborne defences. In service, F-102As also provided air defence in Europe with USAFE, in the Far East and in Southeast Asia, where they protected US airbases in South Vietnam and Thailand from air attack by North Vietnamese fighters and bombers and escorted B-52s and fighter-bombers on their attack sorties.
This illustrated study from leading expert Peter E. Davis details the design, development, and deployment of the futuristic F-102.

COM: Vickers Wellington Units of Bomber Command
The Vickers Wellington was one of very few aircraft types to have been in production and frontline service throughout World War II. After suffering high losses during daytime missions, they began to operate at night from May 1940. They subsequently took part in raids against the Italian port city of Genoa in July 1940, and against Berlin the following month, followed by key missions in the ‘Battle of the Barges’ in September and October, as the RAF targeted the Germany’s invasion fleet being assembled in French Channel ports. When RAF’s strike force expanded the next year following the introduction of the improved Wellington II, the 21 squadrons equipped with the Vickers aircraft, formed the backbone of the Bomber Command night bombing force. Over the next two years Wellingtons participated in all the major operations by Bomber Command, including the daylight raid against German battleships in Brest harbour and the first three ‘Thousand Bomber’ raids.
This illustrated study explores the design, development, and deployment of the Vickers-Wellington type, charting its role in World War II from its earliest missions to its use in training after its withdrawal from frontline bomber missions in 1943.


COM: A-7 Corsair II Units 1975-1991
This volume will cover the A-7 Corsair II and its service with the Light Attack communities assigned to both the Atlantic and Pacific fleets from the end of the Vietnam War through to Desert Storm, immediately after which the final two fleet units equipped with the jet disestablished. The book will detail technological development/improvements that were introduced to the airframe post-Vietnam (the FLIR targeting pod from 1979 and AGM-88 HARM missile from 1983 being the most important), and how they shaped operational employment of the aircraft. The jet’s combat experiences in conflicts during the 1970s (Cambodia), 1980s (Lebanon, Grenada, Libya and Iran) and 1990s (Iraq) will all be detailed, with numerous first-hand accounts from Naval Aviators that saw action with the A-7 during these campaigns.

X-Planes
XPL: Cold War Delta Prototypes
At the dawn of the supersonic jet age, aircraft designers were forced to devise radical new planforms that suited the new power of the jet engine. One of the most successful was the delta wing.
In Britain and America, Fairey and Convair were the two companies that dominated supersonic delta development. In Britain, the Fairey Delta 2 broke the World Air Speed Record in spectacular fashion, but it failed to win a production order. In contrast, Convair received major orders for two jet fighter types and one jet bomber. At the same time, the British Avro company built the 707 family of research aircraft, which led to the famous Vulcan, to show how the delta wing could be adopted for a highly successful subsonic bomber.
This book examines the development of the delta wing in Britain and America, and the experimental aircraft that would prove its potential and versatility. In Britain it covers the Fairey Delta 1 and Fairey Delta 2, the proposed Fairey Delta Rocket Fighter and huge Delta 3 long range interceptor, and the Avro 707. On the American side, it looks at the Convair XF-92 and XF-92A and the development of the Delta Dagger/Delta Dart family, and the Convair Sea Dart – the world’s only supersonic seaplane.


2. Gaslands: Refuelled Chop Shop Challenge - Purple Rain - 2019-08-13 14:54:08
Gaslands: Refuelled comes out in September, but here at Osprey Games HQ we couldn't wait. And so, without further ado, please let us introduce the Gaslands: Refuelled Chop Shop Challenge. Over the next few weeks we are going to be showing off our Gaslands creations, and we invite you all to do the same! If you want to show off your cars simply email us at https://ospreypublishing.com/info@ospreygames.co.uk?subject=gaslands%20refuelled%20chop%20shop%20challenge and include 'Chop Shop Challenge' in the subject, and we'll include it in our upcoming gallery of Gaslands awesomness! You can also share your creations on Twitter - just make sure you include #chopshopchallenge in your tweet!
My second vehicle for the Gaslands: Refuelled Chop Shop Challenge completes my 50 can Mishkin team, joining the Misery Machine (thank you to William Wallace on Facebook for the name). This one is a little more streamlined than my previous creation, although both can get up to Gear 6 thanks to the Experimental Nuclear Engine I crammed into the back of the van (there’s no way I’m going to come to regret that…right?)


Изображение

Purple Rain, perfectly showcased on the PWork Wargames Official Frostgrave Mat!
I went with a Performance Car, giving me some valuable added mobility with the Slip Away special rule. For weapons, I opted for a front facing Death Ray to deal with anyone who dares get ahead of me, a Caltrop Dropper for when I’m out in front, and a handgun because, well, why not? I had a couple of points left over at the end, so I also picked up the Satellite Navigation perk to help out the whole team, allowing me to store Shift Dice at certain points in the game.

Изображение

For the colour scheme, purple and bright green seemed to be a striking combination, and just like with the Misery Machine I wanted my car to stand out. Then I picked out any metallic parts with a classic gunmetal grey, picking out some highlights on the Death Ray with a warm bronze. I was tempted to add some lighter highlights to the body of the car, as it does have some nicely defined lines, but I didn’t trust the steadiness of my hand. I might go back and give it a go though!
I've dubbed this car Purple Rain, although as before I’m open to suggestions. If I stick with Purple Rain, I can hopefully wear my opponents down by quietly singing it under my breath for the entire duration of the game…

Purple Rain
Sponsor
Mishkin
Vehicle Type
Special Rules
Cost
Build Slots
Performance Car
Slip Away
15
2
Weapons
Cost
Build Slots
Death Ray (front facing)
3
1
Caltrop Dropper
1
-
Handgun (crew fired)
-
-






Upgrades
Cost
Build Slots



Perks
Military and Technology
Cost
Total Cost
Dynamo
-

21
All the Toys
-
Thumpermonkey
-
Satellite Navigation
2

Here at Osprey Games HQ we're really enjoying the creations you've all been sharing with us! Keep sending them our way!
Gaslands: Refuelled comes out on 19 September. Preorder your copy today!


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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 15 авг 2019, 18:00

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1. Introducing Last Days: Zombie Apocalypse: Seasons - 2019-08-15 14:32:11
Last Days: Zombie Apocalypse: Seasons is a new supplement for Ash Barker's skirmish wargame of survival horror. It introduces a range of new features to the game, which author Ash Barker will be exploring on the blog over the next few weeks.
As I sit and write the summer is in full glory here in the Wine Country in Canada. The Niagara Delta sits between two of North America’s ‘Great Lakes’, bodies of fresh water so huge they can almost be called inland seas. Being on a sliver of land between two of these means our weather conditions tend to the extremes. Hot and humid in the summer, with winters alternating between ferociously cold if the wind tilts from the north to massively snowy if multiple weather effects collide over us.

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Having spent most of my life living in the province of Ontario I’m no stranger to the four distinct seasons we have. They each present their own challenges to living. As a child my father would take us moose hunting to our cabin in Northern Ontario. Snow as deep as your hip could arrive early in the fall, which was a blessing as in the summer we would have to paddle across a lake to get to the cabin which had no roads. When it froze we could simply haul sleds on snowmobile the mile or so from the nearest logging line that we could drive into.

Last Days: Seasons is an extension of my life lived both rough and easy. I’m a man that is always entertained by the question of ‘What if?…’. Post Apocalyptic fiction finds its very roots in that simple question and the answers are often not pretty.

What IF we had no power? What IF someone was hurt or sick and you had no access to modern medicine? What IF you simply could not travel and began to run short on food? What IF you were struggling to find water?

These are the challenges the Survivors will face in Last Days: Seasons. The Zombies are what ended the world, but they are not the only challenges that need to be overcome.

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Will you collaborate with other Groups to survive? How will the mix of different personalities in your Group effect how resources are distributed and people are cared for? What impact does your Leader’s personal beliefs have on how their little enclave will confront the challenges ahead? That’s what Last Days: Seasons will ask of players embarking on a Campaign.

Some quick details to round this first blog off. Now that you know the theme and here are some of the aspects the book explores as part of it;
1) Seasons is all about surviving a year as your Group. The goal is to play twelve games of Last Days: ZA, each representing a month of their lives. This gives groups some clear structure on the start, middle and end of a Campaign as well as who won!
2) Groups sometimes have to collaborate or go solo into an Encounter. The book contains Solo and Multiplayer rules to cover this.
3) Of course in order to survive all of what’s to come you need to have new Characters, Equipment, Skills and other tasty add-ons to find, learn and use! Over the following weeks I’ll focus on a different Season, starting with Summer (as it begins to wind down here in Ontario) and ending in Spring.
More next week!
Ash Barker
Is your group of survivors ready for a new challenge? Preorder your copy of Last Days: Zombie Apocalypse: Seasons today!


2. Bolt Action: Korea - Exploring the History Part 2 - 2019-08-15 07:21:00
Later this month, the Bolt Action series will expand from its World War II roots to a new, and truly modern, conflict with the publication of Bolt Action: Korea. The book contains all the selectors, scenarios, special rules, and new units required to wargame this turbulent period of world history.
To help you prepare for this upcoming addition to the series, we are exploring the history of the Korean War. We started last week with an extract from Campaign 162: Inch’on 1950 by Gordon L. Rottman, and this week we'll be taking a look at an extract from Campaign 328: Imjin River 1951 by Brian Drohan, accompanied by a fantastic piece of artwork from Steve Noon.
‘Crossing the Imjin’ – the Chinese 187th Division assaults Gloster Crossing, 11.30PM, 22 April 1951

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Chinese troops were under pressure to advance quickly in order to secure the southern bank of the Imjin. This move would allow follow-on forces to continue the assault on the Glosters’ A Company, located on Hill 148. Early in the evening, the Glosters’ commanding officer Lt. Col. Carne despatched a ‘fighting patrol’ of 16 men to the riverbank at Gloster Crossing to provide early warning in the event of a Chinese attack. Carne ordered the leader of the fighting patrol, Lt. Guy Temple, that, if possible, he was to capture an enemy prisoner for interrogation. Furthermore, Carne told Temple that if he encountered a small force, he was to ambush it. But if Chinese troops outnumbered his, Temple was supposed to withdraw. Armed with extra Bren gun ammunition and transported by Oxford carriers, Temple’s men occupied a series of slit trenches near a cut in the riverbank, which allowed vehicles to move into and out of the ford site to Temple’s direct front. There the fighting patrol waited for the enemy. Around 11.30pm, Temple’s men heard splashing and rustling sounds from the north bank. Temple fired several flares to illuminate the crossing site and spotted Chinese soldiers fording the river in strength. Temple called in artillery while his patrol poured machine-gun and rifle fire into the oncoming Chinese as Temple requested artillery support from every gun that 45 Field Regiment had. The Chinese soldiers on the opposite side of the river from Temple’s men were the advanced guard of the 187th Division and carried only the bare necessities – clothing, ammunition, food and water. The most heavily armed among the Chinese carried their individual weapon – a rifle or ‘burp’ gun – as well as satchel charges or grenade bandoliers for use against fortified positions or enemy armoured vehicles. Tactical communications were also far more rudimentary than the radios available to the British; Chinese company and platoon commanders relied on bugles and gongs. The Chinese may have been a low-technology army, but they had the advantage of numbers against Temple’s fighting patrol. Despite the accurate, lethal fire that Temple’s men poured into the advancing Chinese, Chinese troops managed to cross in numbers and mass on the south bank of the river. At this point, Temple received permission from Carne to withdraw to the Glosters’ main positions.
To read more about the Imjin River, pick up a copy of Campaign 328: Imjin River 1951 by Brian Drohan.
For those of you interested in recreating the battles of the Korean war on your tabletop, preorder a copy of Bolt Action: Korea today.


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1. Churchill Infantry Tank - 2019-08-16 10:58:00
Today on the blog, David Fletcher author of Churchill Infantry Tank, recounts the main features of the different Marks of Churchill tank.


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Having written about the Churchill tank a number of times over the years I have come to realise that the whole business is a learning process, they do say that if you wait until you know everything about a subject then you’ll never write anything. To give you an example, I discovered recently that most of the cast turrets for Churchills Mark I and Mark II were made in the United States and despite them being identified in a caption as M3 Grant turrets they are obviously Churchill. In any case it was confirmed later; I now know where they were made and how many were made. Of course this was in the days before Lend-Lease so they had to be paid for but this information is contained in the new book, probably for the first time.

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Churchill Mark II, masquerading as a Churchill Mark I, with a turret probably made in the USA.
Courtesy of Tank Museum.
Much the same could be said of the Churchill Mark VI. In reality it is very difficult to tell apart from an up-gunned Churchill Mark IV; there are differences shown on the stowage diagram, but you need to see these in the photograph, if they were applied. The key identification feature is the layout of the top of the turret but one rarely sees that, however it has enabled us to identify a Mark VI among the Tank Museum exhibits, so at least one has survived. They were produced specifically as such, we know that from the contract cards, but quite how one is identified we still don’t know for sure. The four Churchill tanks supplied to Ireland in 1948 are said to be Mark VI, and one or two survive, but they may be up-gunned and up-armoured Mark IV, there is no easy way of telling.

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Now accurately identified as a Churchill Mark VI, this tank was still believed to be a Mark IV when it stood outside the Tank Museum.
Courtesy of Tank Museum.
The same goes for the Churchill Mark X, indeed all three late Marks. There were plans afoot to build Mark IX (six-pounder gun) Mark X (75mm gun) and Mark XI (95mm howitzer) on older tanks with a new turret and thicker frontal armour, at the end of the war. Having never seen any photographs of these we assumed this was never done, but an official document said that 33 of the Mark X appeared. Nothing is said of Marks IX and XI so we still assume that they were never built. However what looks like a Mark X appeared in photographs taken at the Indian Cavalry Tank Museum at Ahmednagar. It features the heavier Mark VII turret, presumably on a reinforced hull, and a new front plate featuring 152mm thick armour, a rounded porthole for the driver and a rounded mounting for the Besa machine-gun. From the front it looks like a regular Mark VII but a distant side view shows a square door at the side, revealing that it was once an older tank. How it got to India or whether they had any more we don’t know, but again we can say that at least one survives.

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Probably the only surviving example of a Churchill Mark X, preserved at the Indian Cavalry Tank Museum at Ahmednagar.
Naturally, when putting new things in one is supposed to leave something else out. Especially with a relatively slim book such as this is. However, we seem to have covered most of the information about the different Marks of Churchill tank and anyone who wants to know more should study the manuals in a military museum.
The Churchill was a very distinctive tank, hardly likely to be mistaken for anything else. It was woefully under-powered and under-gunned by contemporary standards, especially when compared to its foreign counterparts but it was well armoured and became more reliable latterly, especially when attended by a dedicated crew, but it served right through to the end of World War II and even into the Korean War as well. And then of course there were the Funnies, the AVRES, ARKS, Crocodiles and other special purpose variants although they play no part in this book.
All in all then the Churchill was a remarkable tank, from a most inauspicious start it developed into a key fighting machine and towards the end of World War II even tried to fulfil Field Marshal Montgomery’s ideal of a Universal Tank, albeit rather slowly. Fortunately, a reasonable number have survived, throughout the world, and have given those interested something to focus on, but there is always a wider picture and it is that which this new book attempts to chronicle.
Churchill Infantry Tank publishes 22nd August 2019. Pre-order your copy now.


2. Reality's Edge Developer's Blog 3 – A Different Set of Mechanics - 2019-08-16 07:33:58
Reality's Edge is a cyberpunk skirmish wargame written by Joseph McGuire. On the blog today he looks at the mechanics in a little more detail.
Greetings Sprawlers. As promised earlier, I thought we should dive into the mechanics of the game and how they are different that those that run This Is Not a Test (TNT). If you have not familiar with This Is Not a Test, I suggest you jump here and give those totally free demo rules a quick read.

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Showrunner by Thomas Elliott
Reality’s Edge uses about 80% of the TNT engine. It’s D10, and the occasional D6, based with the result of a die being added to the relevant stat, hoping for a total result of 10 or higher to be successful. Activation Tests remain the same, with a success meaning the model gets two activations and that player continues to activate models until a test is failed or they run out of models. Failure of the test just means that the model only gets one action and play is passed to the next player, with play passing back and forth during the same turn until all models have activated. Those familiar with TNT will have a good start on learning how to play Reality’s Edge. But of course there are some modest differences:
New Stat
Models have two new stats. First is Hit Points (HP). In This Is Not a Test a model has one or more “wounds”, with most having one. If a model is wounded, they are dead. This was done because in a game with up to forty potential models on the table, we needed to keep things simple. Either a model was dead or not; except for a few instances of powerful or heroic miniatures.
In Reality’s Edge, with fewer models on the table, we can track the differences between a simple flesh wound and the full impact of a shotgun blast. Models are still wounded the same as in TNT, with a roll of Strength versus Defense, but instead of losing a single wound or dying, they suffer an amount of damage equal to half the Strength of the hit (rounded up). Most models have 8 wounds. r A pistol hits for three points of damage, where a shotgun blast at close range would do a whopping 5. There are also numerous skills and weapon rules which allow additional damage to stack. For instance, long blades, swords, etc., do an extra point of damage should an attacker roll a Critical (a natural 10 on a D10).
The second new stat is Firewall, which is a model’s protection against cyber attacks. Every model has a Firewall stat. Cyber warfare will be talked about more in depth in a future developer blog, but it’s hard to downplay how important this stat is. For most models, the only protection their equipment, of if they are a drone or robot, their very selves, has against being disable, controlled, or even bricked is their Firewall stat. Firewall works exactly like a Defense stat, but it can be more dynamic as various offensive and defensive applications can cause it to go up and down during gameplay.
Another small change is that the Range stat has been changed to Aim. Many folks noted that having the Range stat could be confusing when talking about ranged attacks in general, so the decision was made to change the name to make things a bit clearer. Not a big deal change mind you, but it’s worth noting.
Improved Heroics
Another benefit with few models is that there is room to play with additional critical effects. One such benefit is that should any model roll a Critical during an Activation Test, they receive an additional action point for free. This has the ability to throw a monkey wrench into a plan or make a longshot tactic miraculously work. Just think of all those times you needed just one more action to take a swing at a tougher enemy or need just a little bit more movement to get to cover, now Lady Luck may give it to you.
Movement and Board Size
Games of This Is Not a Test are played on a 4’ square board, but Reality’s Edge reduces this to 3’ to get to the action quicker. However, models are also not as fast as they are in TNT, where a model could always move their full Move stat in inches for every Action Point spent. Instead, to represent the wet and crowded streets of the Sprawl, a model may only move their full Move stat the first time they move. On a second move, they only move up to D6 inches. And on a third move, which can happen, they move up to D3. Models can still be fast, especially with cybernetics, just not super-fast as they can be in the open areas of the wastelands.
Hiding and Spotting
Perhaps one of the biggest changes is that models can now hide. The Sprawl is full of dark corners and specialist gear can foil the eye, so Reality’s Edge introduces a rule that allows a model to hide for the cost of one Action Point and the requirement they do so while out of line of sight of enemy models. As long as a model remains in cover, moves slowly, and avoids making any type of attack, they cannot be targeted by enemy ranged attacks.
Luckily, models can always to attempt to spot hidden models. To do so, they must spend 1 Action Point and make a Spot Test. They may also only attempt to spot models up to double their Mettle stat in inches, which for most models is 10”.
Ranged Combat
Range combat remains mostly the same, but introduces a few new rules. The first is the point-blank rule. Should a model fire at a model that is 6” or less away from them, they receive a +1 bonus to hit. This is to encourage models to get up close and personal.
Second, models can now shoot walls. While in most cases this is unrealistic, but with the advent of various hacking applications and specialist equipment, operatives have ways of getting line of sight on a model they could otherwise not physically see. If this occurs, they are allowed to fire through a single piece of linear terrain, such as a wall. Of course, this reduces the velocity of the attack, meaning it does less damage to the target, but it is a very useful tactic against tough or cagey enemies.
Finally, suppressive fire has been reworked. The attacker still gets a +3 to hit, but instead of wounding, the target must make a Grazed Test with a -2 penalty to avoid diving for cover. This makes suppressive fire a more viable option of keeping the enemy’s head down. Suppressive fire can also be used against hidden enemies, even if they have not been spotted. The attacker is not necessarily targeting the hidden model, but the area they may be in. The model can still only attack a hidden model within their range of spotting and does not receive the +3 to hit. As always suppressive fire cannot harm a model unless the attacker rolls a Critical.
Strategic Withdrawal
While this was addressed in a later supplement for TNT, Reality’s Edge starts with the option for crews to bail during a game from the start. If a game is going south, a player may simply pack up his things and go at the start of any turn by removing all their models. A player that withdraws may keep any spoils they have earned, but the opposing player is assumed to have won the scenario and keeps any spoils that have yet to be claimed.
Carry Capacity
In This Is Not a Test, models could carry an infinite amount of weapons, but could only use two one-handed weapons or a single two-handed weapon at one time. They had to spend an Action Point to swap items out. Of course, during game play many players, your humble author included, would forget about this restriction and just swap out willy-nilly. Reality’s Edge does away with this rule. Instead, models are assumed to have any number of items tucked away in easy to access pockets or attached to convenient webbing. As such, a model can freely use any item they carry at any time.
However, a model is now limited to how much they carry by their number of slots. Each operative type can has only so many slots. Combat oriented operatives like enforcers and ronin have more, but support characters like console cowboys and street docs have less. Small items like pistols and melee weapons may only take up 1 slot, where support weapons and larger items take 2 or more.
Lastly, concealability of items is important too. Should a model try to blend into a crowd, which will be discussed in a future developer blog, a model is going to have a tough time if they are carrying a huge sword and covered in heavy armor. Finally, the same holds true if the model has to deal with CORPSEC officers, for instance, if they get arrested and have to make bail. Getting caught with banned weapons and items can ratchet up any potential fines and/or jail time.
Well that’s it for now. In the next blog, I will discuss NPC’s and how civilians can get in your way.
Excited to see how your gang does in the Sprawl? Preorder your copy of Reality's Edge today!


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