Новини - литература и периодика

Раздел за фирмени новини
Потребителски аватар
Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България
Мнения: 14276
Регистриран: 02 яну 2012, 19:25

Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 20 юни 2018, 00:01

Blog
Blog

1. Frostgrave: Oathgold - Sample Chapter - 2018-06-19 10:01:57
Kazran is a pursuer, a member of an ancient bounty-hunting order. Wielding the magics of the mythical Court of Crows, he has lived a life dedicated to bringing justice to the wronged, without fear or favour.
But when circumstance forces him to accept commission from a notorious crime lord, Kazran becomes entangled in a web of deception and betrayal. As he scours Frostgrave's ruins in search of a young woman and her stolen magical treasure, he finds more questions than answers. Who is she? What exactly did she steal? Why did she run? And just where does Kazran's mysterious benefactor stand on the matter?
In the end, the greatest question remains - does justice have any place in the Frozen City?
Read the first chapter of Frostgrave: Oathgold, Matthew Ward's latest Frostgrave novel, below!



Frostgrave: Oathgold will be available from 28th June, and contains a Frostgrave scenario written by Joseph A. McCullough! Order your copy today!


Потребителски аватар
Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България
Мнения: 14276
Регистриран: 02 яну 2012, 19:25

Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 27 юни 2018, 00:00

Blog
Blog

1. The Pritzker Literature Award - Dennis Showalter - 2018-06-26 12:05:00

Изображение


We are delighted to announce that Dennis Showalter, author of Instrument of War, has been awarded the Pritzker Military Museum & Library Literature Award for Lifetime Achievement in Military Writing. Please see below for all the details:

Pritzker Military Museum & Library Announces 2018 Literature Award Recipient
Dennis Showalter wins $100,000 prize for lifetime achievement in military writing
CHICAGO, June 26, 2018— Military historian and author Dennis Showalter is the 12th recipient of the Pritzker Military Museum & Library Literature Award for Lifetime Achievement in Military Writing.
The Pritzker Literature Award—which includes a gold medallion, citation, and $100,000 honorarium—recognizes and honors the contributions of a living author for a body of work dedicated to enriching the understanding of military history and affairs. Museum & Library Founder & Chair Jennifer N. Pritzker, a retired colonel in the Illinois National Guard, will formally present Showalter with the award at the organization’s annual Liberty Gala on November 3 at the Hilton Chicago, where he will be joined by past recipients.
“It’s a great honor to accept the 2018 Pritzker Literature Award. For the historical profession it is a combination of an Oscar and a Pulitzer and I think it’s a good deal more fun than either,” said Showalter. “No one who wins this award does it alone. We stand on the shoulders of the men and women of our profession, our colleagues, and above all the students…The importance of teaching history at military academies and advanced institutions is that the tendency of these institutions is to go towards engineering, technical subjects, and to be focused on specific strategic problems. Military history itself is as vital to the military education institutions as oxygen.”

Изображение

Dennis Showalter is an accomplished military historian and respected professor. He is the author of more than 16 major publications, including Tannenberg: Clash of Empires, Patton and Rommel: Men of War in the 20th Century, Armor and Blood: Kursk, 1943, Frederick the Great: A Military History, The Wars of German Unification, and Instrument of War: The German Army 1914-18. His latest book, coming in September, is The German Failure in Belgium, August 1914, with Joseph P. Robinson and Janet A. Robinson. He has gained recognition for his research demonstrating the interrelationship between the military and civil society.
“Dennis Showalter was selected by Colonel Pritzker from a group of three superbly qualified and eminent military historians that were picked by an advisory committee of past award winners and members of the PMML board,” said Chair of the Selection Committee, John Rowe. “The committee’s recommendations and Colonel Pritzker’s selection were driven by Mr. Showalter’s long and brilliant record of writing, especially about World Wars I and II. Members of the committee are especially motivated by innovative intellectual contributions to the field. Colonel Pritzker is equally motivated by genuine public service and by the accessibility of the writer’s work to a wider public audience. Speaking for myself, I have enjoyed and been informed by Showalter’s work and am delighted that the list of deserving candidates for the award continues to grow as we work together.”
Now in its twelfth year, the Pritzker Literature award was first presented to historian James McPherson in 2007. Past recipients – several of whom served as members of the award’s 2018 screening committee – are Allan Millett, Gerhard Weinberg, Rick Atkinson, Carlo D’Este, Sir Max Hastings, Tim O’Brien, Antony Beevor, David Hackett Fischer, Hew Strachan and Peter Paret.
A graduate of the University of Minnesota, Showalter is Professor Emeritus at Colorado College, and a former President, Vice President, and Trustee of the Society for Military History. He has served as Editor or Editor in Chief for a variety of military history journals and book series, including Oxford Bibliographies: Military History.
A recipient of the Samuel Eliot Morrison Achievement Award from the Society for Military History and the American Historical Association Paul Birdsall Prize, Showalter is a distinguished scholar who has elevated military history as an academic discipline and as a useful tool for scholars and soldiers alike.
The Pritzker Literature Award is sponsored by the Pritzker Military Foundation. To learn more about the award or the selection process, or to watch the 2008 Literature Award recipient, Allan Millett, announce Dennis Showalter as this year’s winner, visit pritzkermilitary.org.
About the Pritzker Military Museum & Library
The Pritzker Military Museum & Library is open to the public and features an extensive collection of books, artifacts, and rotating exhibits covering many eras and branches of the military. From its founding in 2003, it is a center where citizens and soldiers come together to learn about military history and the role of the military in a democracy. The Museum & Library is a non-partisan, non-government information center supported by its members and sponsors.


Изображение
Publishing this month in paperback, Dennis Showalter’s Instrument of War is a collection of more than a half-century of research and teaching. In this fresh perspective on the German Army during World War I, Showalter explores the internal dynamics and operational strategy, and shows how both the army and Germany itself were changed by war.
This illuminating volume details the major campaigns on the Western and Eastern fronts and the forgotten war fought in the Middle East and Africa, and has been awarded the 2016 Tomlinson Prize by the World War One Historical Association.
Praise for Instrument of War:
‘Wry, insightful and memorable’ – Professor Geoffrey Wawro, author of A Mad Catatrophe
‘America’s leading historian returns to his speciality, the German army, and provides a first rate study, at once accessible and scholarly, that focuses on the strengths, resilience and eventual failure of the army during the First World War. A deft mix of the varied levels and experience of war.’ – Professor Jeremy Black


Congratulations to Dennis on this outstanding achievement. To read more about the award, please click here, and to order your copy of Instrument of War you can click here.


Потребителски аватар
Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България
Мнения: 14276
Регистриран: 02 яну 2012, 19:25

Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 28 юни 2018, 00:00

Blog
Blog

1. Preparing for the Apocalypse with author Ash Barker! - 2018-06-27 07:26:00
Last Days: Zombie Apocalypse is a skirmish game of survival horror, in which players control groups of survivors and battle rival gangs and zombies as they search for the supplies they need to make it through the night.
The Zombie Apocalypse is upon us, but don't panic! Author Ash Barker is here to help us prepare for the undead hordes! Last Days: Zombie Apocalypse - What do I need to play?
Wondering what you need to get while you wait for your copy of the book to arrive? Ash has got you covered, giving you information on the size of the gaming area, terrain, miniatures and more!

Last Days: Zombie Apocalypse - Building your survivor group!
Ash explains the process behind creating your group, from choosing your leader to selecting your refuge, then finally to recruiting your survivors.
To help you put together your group, download the Roster Sheet and Group and Refuge sheet from the Gaming Resources page.
Last Days: Zombie Apocalypse - Full Playthrough!
Ash and Jay fight for supplies at Eagle Ranger Station, but who will come out on top? The video also shows what happens after the game when playing a campaign!
Before you dive into your first game, make sure you download the Quick Reference sheet from our Gaming Resources page!

Last Days: Zombie Apocalypse is out on June 28th, so order your copy today! Be sure to join the Facebook Group to take part in the discussion, show off your creations, and share the stories of your adventures!
For more videos from Ash, be sure to !


Потребителски аватар
Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България
Мнения: 14276
Регистриран: 02 яну 2012, 19:25

Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 29 юни 2018, 00:00

Blog
Blog

1. Sneak Peek at September's Artwork - 2018-06-28 11:42:00
Today is publication day for our June releases, and we thought today on the blog we'd take a look at some of our upcoming books. This month's artwork reveal features British ironclads of the 1800s, pistols used throughout World War I, and the shooting down of B-52s during the Vietnam War.
Take a sneak peek below and remember to let us know which is your favourite plate in the comments below!
Air Campaign 6: Operation Linebacker II 1972 by Marshal III
Illustrated by Jim Laurier

Изображение

This first plate is taken from the newest addition to our Air Campaign series, Operation Linebacker II 1972, and depicts the first B-52 shoot-down. A missile site of the 93rd Battalion, 261st Regiment fires its SA-2s at the first wave of B-52s. The first to be shot down, Charcoal 01 has just been hit. Here the North Vietnamese have all six of their launchers with missiles mounted, as well as six ZIL trucks, each with a new missile, waiting in a holding area to come to the launcher as soon as the missile was fired.
Weapon 64: The Luger by Neil Grant
Illustrated by Johnny Shumate

Изображение

This second plate, from The Luger, depicts a cavalry mêlée between Russian and German cavalrymen on the Eastern Front in August 1914. Here, the benefit of the pistol can be seen, as it is used with one hand while the other controls the horse. As a pistol bullet could not be parried, it meant that an opponent could be shot down before he is able to come within sword reach.
New Vanguard 262: British Ironclads 1860–75 by Angus Konstam
Illustrated by Paul Wright

Изображение

Our final plate from British Ironclad 1860–75 shows HMS Captain in the Bay of Biscay, 1870. The ship resembled the Monarch, but had key differences, such as the placement of her two twin-gun turrets on a deck lower than in the earlier ironclad. She was also twin-screwed, giving her an impressive top speed of more than 15 knots. However, her sailing qualities were less favourable, and just eight months after she entered service she encountered a gale in the Bay of Biscay and began heeling alarmingly. Shortly after midnight on 7 September she foundered, taking Coles and 472 men down with her. There were only 18 survivors.
These three titles are now available to pre-order, click here to browse more of our exciting upcoming titles.


Потребителски аватар
Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България
Мнения: 14276
Регистриран: 02 яну 2012, 19:25

Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 30 юни 2018, 00:00

Blog
Blog

1. Frostgroove - A playlist for the Frozen City - 2018-06-29 08:43:23
Our latest #Frostgroove competition has come to an end! Thank you to all those who entered to help us put together this fantastic playlist to set the scene for adventures in the Frozen City.

Track list:
Birth of a Hero - Thomas Bergersen
Tyr - Wardruna
Over Hill - Howard Shore
The Winds of Winter - Ramin Djawadi
Atmosphere Station - James Horner, London Symphony Orchestra
Castle Chase Parts 1 & 2 - David Whitaker
Beneath the Ice - Jeremy Soule
A Story You Won't Believe - Marcin Przybyłowicz
Ice Ice Baby - Vanilla Ice
Congratulations to the winners on their fantastic suggestions, and if you have any more ideas for what to include on the Frostgrave playlist be sure to send them in!


Потребителски аватар
Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България
Мнения: 14276
Регистриран: 02 яну 2012, 19:25

Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 03 юли 2018, 00:00

Blog
Blog

1. July Sale 2018 - 2018-07-02 16:31:00
Изображение

This month's sale features a wealth of incredible Osprey titles, as we're providing all customers 20% off our Campaign, Fortress and Raid series books. This includes hundreds of books and eBooks, and runs until Tuesday 3rd July.
We recommend
Below are some of our recent releases in our series books, so have a browse below and be sure to check out the series tabs at the side of the website for more!
Изображение

Изображение

Изображение

Изображение


Изображение

Изображение

Изображение

Изображение


Изображение

Изображение

Изображение

Изображение

This month's sale excludes books and eBooks publishing in July–September 2018.


Потребителски аватар
Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България
Мнения: 14276
Регистриран: 02 яну 2012, 19:25

Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 04 юли 2018, 00:00

Blog
Blog

1. July's Book Vote and June's Results - 2018-07-03 16:22:00
A new month means a new book vote, and we're very excited to hear your thoughts on this month's suggestions. This month's vote features 5 prospective Combat titles battling it out for your vote, so reader over the descriptions below and choose your favourite!
CBT: Japanese Soldier vs Soviet Soldier CBT: Polish Soldier vs German Soldier
CBT: Soviet Rifleman vs Finnish Infantryman
CBT: US Soldier vs Japanese Soldier
CBT: Gurkha vs Fallschirmjäger
Japanese Soldier vs Soviet Soldier: Khalkhin Gol 1939
In May and June 1939, escalating tension on the Mongolia/Manchuria border led to a series of bloody clashes between Japanese and Soviet troops in an undeclared war that lasted until a ceasefire in mid-September that year.
Polish Soldier vs German Soldier: Poland 1939
During September–October 1939, Polish and German forces clashed in the opening Blitzkrieg campaign, which saw the Panzers overrun much of Poland in a matter of weeks despite strenuous Polish efforts to resist the invaders.
Soviet Rifleman vs Finnish Infantryman: Continuation War 1941–44
From June 1941, Finnish troops fought alongside German and other forces against the Soviets. After recovering territory lost in 1940, the Finns participated in the siege of Leningrad before facing a renewed Soviet onslaught in mid-1944.
US Soldier vs Japanese Soldier: New Guinea 1942–43
During World War II, US and Australian troops sought to eject Japanese forces from New Guinea in a series of brutal battles. The inhospitable jungle terrain proved to be a particularly demanding environment for both sides, operating at the limits of their supply lines.
Gurkha vs Fallschirmjäger: Monte Cassino 1944
At the height of World War II’s Italian campaign, Gurkhas of the British Indian Army fought members of Nazi Germany’s elite airborne arm during the prolonged struggle for the abbey ruins on Monte Cassino.
Make your vote by clicking here!
Last month's vote was another close one, but we did eventually receive a winner, with Stalingrad Airlift 1943 taking the top spot with 23.04% of the vote, closely followed by Iraq, Afghanistan, and Somaliland 1919-39 with 22.35%. ACM: Schweinfurt-Regensburg Raids 1943 16.58% ACM: Iraq, Afghanistan, and Saomaliland 1919-39 22.35% ACM: Ho Chi Minh Trail 1964-73 21.58% ACM: Russian Strategic Bombing in World War I 16.45% ACM: Stalingrad Airlift 1943 23.04%


Потребителски аватар
Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България
Мнения: 14276
Регистриран: 02 яну 2012, 19:25

Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 06 юли 2018, 00:00

Blog
Blog

1. Last Days Playthrough: Massacre Site - 2018-07-05 08:36:12
Author Ash Barker leads his ragged band of survivors against Jay's gang as their Last Days: Zombie Apocalypse campaign continues. Having battled it out at Eagle Ranger Station (ICYMI, click here to watch the Lets Play video), they now find themselves in a nearby town, where another band of survivors lost their fight against the undead. They don't need their valuable supplies anymore, but seem reluctant to give them up...

Last Days: Zombie Apocalypse is a skirmish game of survival horror in which players battle rival groups of survivors and zombies, hoping to make it through another day. Order your copy today!


Потребителски аватар
Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България
Мнения: 14276
Регистриран: 02 яну 2012, 19:25

Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 07 юли 2018, 00:00

Blog
Blog

1. Dracula's America: New Factions from Forbidden Power - 2018-07-06 09:46:39
Coming at the end of July, Dracula's America: Shadows of the West: Forbidden Power takes the Weird Wild West to the swamps, cities, and plantations of the Deep South. The book contains new stealth rules, expanded rules for arcane powers, and a host of new scenarios, Hired Guns, monsters, skills, and gear.
Alongside these additions, Forbidden Power brings two new factions to the game - the corrupt cultists of the Church of Dagon and the Salem Sisterhood, occult practitioners whose history dates back to the early Colonies. The Church of Dagon

Изображение

Hybrid of Dagon
Artwork by RU-MOR
“Brothers and Sisters of the Flock, I stand before you today to bring you wondrous news!
The stars are righ and, as They promised our ancestors millennia ago, the Old Ones are returning to our benighted world to illuminate its darkness with Their shining light! Ia! Ia!
Great Father Dagon has spoken to me in a holy vision, and instructed me to prepare you all for what is to come. We Faithful of the Old Ways are to be His righteous instruments in the coming time of judgement.
See, His temples have already arisen in the wilderness and His children have awoken to walk amongst us once more. Brothers and Sisters, we are truly blessed to live in this time of miracles!
Let us go out into the world and bring the Word of Dagon to the heathen and the ignorant, so that all may bask in His divine light! Ia! Ia!”
Joining the Church of Dagon means throwing in your lot with deranged fanatics who live and die to serve unspeakable eldritch horrors from another dimension. Beware – the rewards are great, but the price may be far greater!
Your posse will be led by a Priest of Dagon, a powerful spellcaster, while two non-Hired Gun models will become strange, mutated Hybrids.
Check out the Church of Dagon miniatures from North Star Military Figures. The Salem Sisterhood

Изображение


Maiden and Mother
Artwork by RU-MOR
“Blessed Be, Sisters.
For generations, the womenfolk of our families have protected Washington’s Secret – since the time of the Pilgrim Fathers, we have been a part of this great nation.
Though persecuted and feared by the ignorant, our Sisterhood has never wavered in its sworn duty to protect the forbidden relics and uphold our oath.
Our generation is not about to fail now, when the stakes are at their highest!”
Joining the Salem Sisterhood means your Posse is led by the powerful white witches of the Sisterhood, in tune with the Arcane balance of the natural world. Alone, they are vulnerable – when used as a Coven, their mastery of Arcane Power grows exponentially.
This Coven will be formed from three female non-Hired Gun models, which will be designated as Witches. The Salem Sisterhood will also designate a single male non-Hired Gun model to protect the Coven – the Guardian.
Check out the Salem Sisterhood miniatures from North Star Military Figures.

Dracula's America: Shadows of the West: Forbidden Power is publishing on 26th of July. Preorder your copy today!


Потребителски аватар
Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България
Мнения: 14276
Регистриран: 02 яну 2012, 19:25

Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 09 юли 2018, 00:00

Blog
Blog

1. US Airborne Soldier vs German Soldier - 2018-07-08 12:24:00
Today on the blog, David Campbell joins us to discuss his new book US Airborne Soldier vs German Soldier, and the evolution of airborne attacks during World War II.

Dropping in on the Germans. The Evolution of Airborne Attack & Defence, 1943-44
The formation of the airborne units in the US army was something of an evolutionary process, but a generally beneficial one that saw small highly-trained cadres of volunteer paratroopers gradually expand into highly capable divisions of parachute and glider infantry. Initially spurred on by the examples of German airborne operations during the invasions of France and the Low Countries in 1940, compounded by the spectacular if bloody coup that was the assault on Crete in 1941, air-delivered forces were not something any army could afford to ignore. Within the somewhat hidebound US army establishment there was little consensus about the strategic impact that such forces could have, with disagreement from the time of their formation over the sorts of operations that such a force was best suited to undertake, as well as why ordinary infantry couldn’t do the job just as well.
Doctrine evolves – the Sicilian experience, July 1943

Изображение
US paratroops bound for Sicily
Probably the single most important figure in the evolution of US airborne doctrine was James Gavin, a West Point graduate, later instructor, who possessed a flair for tactical innovation and joined the 503rd Parachute Infantry Battalion as the commander of C company in August 1941. He proved to be the right man in the right place at the right time, understanding the need for airborne forces to develop a coherent doctrine that would not only define their role in the operational environment but also establish their distinctiveness and value in relation to the divisions of ‘straight leg’ infantry. The importance of the latter point should not be underestimated, as there was no shortage of senior officers in the US Army who were far from convinced of the utility of such expensively selected, trained and equipped troops even in early 1943. Gavin drafted the manual of airborne warfare, ‘FM 31-30: Tactics and Technique of Air-Borne Troops’, outlining within its pages the operational and tactical factors that should determine how and when airborne forces should be used to best effect. Much of what he wrote was proven correct in combat, and most of his doctrine outlasted the war, defining parachute and airborne operations for decades to come.
For the Germans, the need to develop systems to counter large-scale airborne incursions became an unpleasant reality for the Wehrmacht as it moved onto a more defensive footing towards the end of 1942. Even so, few specific measures were undertaken, and the Allied landings in Sicily (Operation Husky) showed just how slapdash the German approach had been. As badly scattered and disorganised as the jump of Gavin’s 505 Parachute Regimental Combat Team (505 PRCT) was, its troops were aggressive enough to overcome many of their initial tactical disadvantages, to take the initiative and throw back much larger and better equipped units from Panzer Division ‘Hermann Göring’. That unit, filled with inexperienced troops unfamiliar with the intricacies of combined operations and led by men who were generally more enthusiastic than they were competent, played a large part in the success of Gavin’s paratroopers.
The quality of Gavin’s men had compensated for the operational failings in the combat jump of 505 PRCT, and the overall success of the paratroopers in securing the zones behind the beachheads at Gela and Scoglitti, fending off German counterattacks that could have played serious havoc with the amphibious landings, proved their worth. For future operations there would be an understanding that airborne units, rather than being frittered away on localised tactical pursuits, ought to be committed as an operational force that would be at the disposal of the theatre commander, maximising their impact on the battlefront.

Изображение
James M. Gavin
Combating airborne attacks, Normandy & Nijmegen 1944
Sicily, indeed, proved to be the key learning ground for the Germans as well, who realised that paratroopers needed to be overwhelmed with great speed and overwhelming power to ensure that the ‘infection’ of an airborne incursion did not have a chance to take root. Rommel, taking charge of the German defences along the Atlantic wall in early 1944, understood that fending off the airborne element of an allied invasion was not something that could be left to chance, leading him to establish a system of physical defences supplemented by quick reaction units. The defences were designed to disrupt potential landing sites, principally of gliders, with the quick reaction units positioned to move against and annihilate the lightly-armed airborne troops before they could establish themselves or link up with units from the amphibious invasion force.
In the event though Rommel’s obstructions to landing grounds caused some problems, they were too few in number and, after Allied reconnaissance discovered their positions in the week prior to the invasion, generally avoided. The quick reaction units, despite some gallant actions, were too few in number and not nearly well trained enough or supported to deal decisive blows to the paratroopers they suddenly found in their midst on 6 June. The experience of the 91. Luftlande-Division, who bore the brunt of the fighting against the 82nd Division, was telling: the men had no experience in anything much larger than platoon-level operations which led to basic mistakes and meant that it could not easily adapt to failures of communication or command, that latter of which was particularly acute as the division’s commanding officer, Generalleutnant Wilhelm Falley, was killed in the first hours of the invasion by a marauding band of paratroopers.
The Allied landings at Eindhoven, Nijmegen and Arnhem proved to be a mixed bag, but the German response at all the landing sites was generally much more pointed and effective than at Normandy; anti-airborne defences were seen as impractical (in time, effort and materiel) and thus not used, the defenders instead relying on rapid counter-attacks led by armour that would ideally overwhelm the airheads before they could be properly established. The 82nd Airborne Division, given the task of securing the bridges over the Maas and Waal rivers at Grave and Nijmegen respectively, had a vast amount of ground to seize and defend, a fact that certainly contributed to their failure to take the road bridge at Nijmegen, which was practically undefended at the time of their landing. Such a rare failure of initiative had serious consequences, allowing an ad-hoc collection of units built around SS-kampfgruppen from 10. SS-Panzer-Division ‘Frundsberg’ to establish themselves in the north of the city, forcing the 82nd into a prolonged and bloody effort to eject them and seize the road and rail bridges. The situation was considerably worse nine miles further up the road at Arnhem.

Изображение
Waves of paratroops land in Holland
To be involved in an airborne operation, as an attacker or a defender, could be an exhilarating and frightening experience, one in which individual initiative and skill counted for a great deal. Colonel James Gavin, who led the 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment into its first operation in Sicily (and who would go on to command the 82nd in Normandy, Holland and beyond), wrote an entry in his diary just before he set off from the 505 PRCT’s airfield in Tunisia: “We are in for one hell of a fight…I love the prospects but feel as scared as I did on my first jump. It is going to be exciting’ (quoted in LoFaro 2011: 74).
Read more about the development of the American airborne forces and the German countermeasures that evolved in response to the threat of Allied airborne landings, in US Airborne Soldier vs German Soldier.


Потребителски аватар
Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България
Мнения: 14276
Регистриран: 02 яну 2012, 19:25

Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 10 юли 2018, 00:00

Blog
Blog

1. The RAF Centenary Flypast - 2018-07-09 10:14:00
This year, across the UK, we have been marking the centenary of the Royal Air Force, with a great selection of new books uncovering the awe-inspiring and daring histories of RAF pilots, and with events across the country honouring the servicemen and women.
When is the RAF100 flypast?
Tomorrow, 10 July 2018, the largest concentration of military aircraft in recent memory takes to the skies of London to mark this monumental anniversary, which will include an incredible display over the Mall and Buckingham Palace.
The flypast will begin to form over Suffolk to the west of Ipswich at around 12.45pm, before making its way over Colchester and Chelmsford.
What is it?
Approximately 100 jets, helicopers and aeroplanes will be taking part, including Spitfires, the Read Arrows and moden aircraft, so this is sure to be a breathtaking, once-in-a-lifetime display. See below the list from The Royal Air Force on which aircraft are due to take part. It's certainly not one to be missed!
Make sure you're following Osprey Books on Twitter to see some of the incredible scenes from the day.

Изображение
Source: The Royal Air Force
The event marks the start of the RAF100 Aircraft tour, which travels to Newcastle, Northern Ireland, Birmingham, Glasgow and Manchester, and you can discover more of the amazing events going on up and down the UK, by clicking here.
Read more about the RAF's incredible history
Изображение

Изображение

Изображение

Изображение

Изображение

Изображение

Изображение

Изображение


Потребителски аватар
Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България
Мнения: 14276
Регистриран: 02 яну 2012, 19:25

Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 11 юли 2018, 00:00

Blog
Blog

1. Gerry Embleton Retires - 2018-07-10 14:00:12
It's a sad day for Osprey, and for me personally, but we have to announce that after 43 years as a greatly valued contributor to our Men-at-Arms and other series, Gerry Embleton has decided that he can no longer take on regular book illustration contracts. As a commissioning editor, this is grim news for me; on the other hand – as when Mike Chappell retired in 2012 – it is a great pleasure for me that another of my oldest friends has 'got out alive'.
At the age of 77, and having illustrated nearly 60 Men-at-Arms, Elite and Warrior titles (see list below) and contributed to about a dozen more in other series, nobody can say that he owes us anything. On the contrary: we owe him an enormous debt, not only for his own books, but for playing a central part in the improvement of illustration standards back in the 1970s. It was Gerry, alongside the late Richard Hook and Angus McBride. who raised the bar for everybody when the series was still feeling its way.

Изображение

MAA 39 The British Army in North America 1775-83
His first title, MAA 39 'The British Army in North America 1775-83', written by Robin May and published in 1974, was the first book in the series to benefit from colour plates based on really detailed, specific research into uniform history. The 18th century is one of Gerry's areas of particular expertise, and the same author/artist team soon followed it with MAA 48 'Wolfe's Army', covering the redcoats in America during the Seven Years' War. Both stayed in print for more than 20 years, until Gerry's continuing research allowed the publication in 1997 of revised editions of each of them, with entirely new plates. (NB – serious students of these subjects need both editions on their shelves.)
Gerry's working output
There is only room here for a very brief summary of a long and productive career that has included some 200 books entirely illustrated or contributed to, about 60 of them on historical military costume, and many magazine articles. He has also planned, supervised and written two colour-photographic books recreating medieval costume and armour.
In all his work Gerry has been driven by a hunger to discover, and illustrate, how period costume and equipment actually looked when being worn by contemporary human beings, and this has extended to an insatiable curiosity about the whole field of what is today called 'historical material culture'. In simple terms, confronted with historical figures to recreate in two (or three) dimensions, Gerry ideally wants to know everything about them – from their age, health and hairstyle, to what they might be sitting on, what they had for breakfast, and what they've got in their pockets.
Apart from historical and military illustration work, Gerry has produced children's educational and fairytale illustrations, including an 18-book series that sold world-wide; general adult illustration; comic strips; advertising; poster artwork; designs for ceramic and pewter figures, and chess sets; designs for museum exhibitions; and, throughout it all, a background output of landscapes in oils and other paintings in various mediums, which have been exhibited in London, Edinburgh, Brighton, Washington DC, Toronto, and Berne, Grandson and Gruyere in Switzerland. (These have included a vivid strand of fantasy paintings, which might be described as a sort of merging of fairytale, 'magical' and 'steam-punk' traditions.) From the mid-1980s until a few years ago he also earned international renown for 'three-dimensional' illustrations – lifesize costumed figures, produced by his Swiss-based company Time Machine AG for museums in several countries.
How it all began
Gerry's parents lived in Bow, East London, but he was born in Edgware, Middlesex in 1941. (He was thus robbed of the classic definition of Cockney identity by his mother's wish to concentrate upon the project undisturbed by the Luftwaffe's then-nightly visits to the East End. Gerry recalls later nights of red skies, searchlights and 'ack-ack' fire, and some spent in the understair cupboard when the alarm sounded too late to reach the air-raid shelter). Throughout the war years his father was absent, serving with the Royal Army Medical Corps in North Africa and Italy. Gerry had two older brothers, and he followed the eldest, Ron – who also became a renowned illustrator and cartoonist – in an early passion for all things military, which was fuelled by films and books.

Изображение

Bulgars & Allies, 11th-12th Centuries
MAA 491 Armies of the Volga Bulgars & Khanate of Kazan
When Ron returned from his own military service in the Malayan Emergency and took up illustration professionally, the ten-year-old Gerry soon became his all-purpose assistant and, inevitably, pupil. Illustrated magazines for young people enjoyed a heyday in Britain in the 1950s-60s; Gerry was just 14 when he sold his first full page of strip art, and 15 when his first historical illustration was published.
Gerry turned down the chance to go to art school full-time (though for many years he always continued to attend life-drawing classes regularly). Leaving school at 16, between 1957 and 1965 he submerged himself in comic-strips, historical illustrations for educational magazines, and fairytale illustrations – a valuable combination of tightly disciplined composition with opportunities to pursue both research and imaginative freedom. From monochrome work in pen and wash he now began to experiment with coloured inks, conté crayon and wash, and gouache. He has continued to use this mixture of mediums ever since.
Gerry's first serious military illustrations appeared in the later 1960s in a magazine called Tradition, based in the West End of London and co-located with a shop of the same name which sold military figurines – this was at the very beginning of the hobby of painting finely detailed miniatures. A meeting with Col J.B.R Nicholson (alongside the legendary Brig Peter Young, a leading light in the 'Sealed Knot' Civil War society) led to a commission to paint the charge of the Black Watch at Fort Ticonderoga in 1758 for the cover of Tradition No.19. ('Fort Ti' later bought the original artwork to hang in the museum; when it was subsequently stolen by a fan, they commissioned Gerry to paint a replacement. Through his contact with the Quebec historian Réné Chartrand, Gerry has also painted several other works for exhibition at various of Parks Canada's historic sites.)
Regular commissions for Tradition brought Gerry into contact with fellow military history enthusiasts on both sides of the Atlantic, and began his assembly of a serious research library, based not least on study of the great masters of previous centuries. Gerry acknowledges a great debt during this period to the patience and kindness of such experts as Eugène Lelièpvre, Russell Robinson, Boris Mollo and Bill Thorburn, whom he badgered for sources and information.
It was Gerry's work in Tradition that led to our meeting, when I was editing, with the weapons historian Fred Wilkinson, a book called The Universal Soldier (Guinness Superlatives, 1971). This needed a series of 14 careful colour plates of soldiers down the ages. Together Gerry and I had the memorable opportunity to actually handle, try on, and photograph such things as reproduction Roman 'Corbridge' armour under the guidance of Russell Robinson at the Tower Armouries, a ringmail shirt, an original buff coat and half-armour, and 19th-century uniforms, and to be 'taught muskets' by the American authority De Witt Bailey. This was a formative experience for both of us, and it strongly coloured Gerry's subsequent approach. His lasting interest in the history of the British redcoat in North America led, in 1976, to a commission to research and paint uniforms and to act as a consultant for the bicentennial American Revolution exhibition sponsored by the London Sunday Times and mounted at the Royal Maritime Museum, Greenwich.
Meanwhile, in 1972 I had started doing freelance editorial work for Osprey on the Men-at-Arms series, and in 1974 I took over as the series commissioning and art editor (the latter a position which Osprey had not previously filled.) The series needed improvement, particularly in the planning and execution of the colour plates, and I managed to persuade Gerry to accept some commissions. He also generously introduced me to his contemporary illustrators Richard Hook and Angus McBride. For all this, I (we) remain in his debt.
To Switzerland
In 1978, after a visit to a German military miniature convention at Kulmbach had opened his eyes to possibilities in continental Europe, Gerry decided to move to Switzerland (initially to the picturesque town of Thun in the Bernese Oberland, and subsequently to Grandson and later Yverdon, both on Lake Neuchâtel). His astonished delight at the wealth of surviving original items and illustrated records from Switzerland's medieval wars then led him into a serious study of that period's clothing, armour and artefacts, and the first published fruit of this was MAA 94, The Swiss at War 1300-1500, in 1979.

Изображение

Footsoldiers of the period 1300-1400
MAA 94 The Swiss at War 1300-1500
Gerry had met the medievalist Eugen Heer, the director of the Swiss Institute of Arms and Armour at Grandson Castle, through the latter's contribution to The Universal Soldier, and in 1984 Gerry moved there to work, subsequently as head of the art department. This involved not only illustrating many of the artefacts that passed through the Institute (which was a commercial enterprise), and curating and expanding the Institute's reference library, but wide-ranging design work and setting up displays for private collector clients in Europe. Working alongside the widely respected armourer Ian Ashdown gave him opportunities to learn what it was actually like to wear items of 14th-15th century armour – for instance, the truth about weight and mobility, and the severely limited visibility from inside visored helmets, which gave the lie to some conventional assumptions about medieval battles.
From the 'outer shell' he moved 'inward', studying what was worn under armour – first the challenge of finding authentic references for 'arming' caps and doublets, then to studying the patterns of medieval costume as revealed by contemporary artists and rare surviving examples, and learning about materials, construction and dyes. Increasingly he applied this approach to his historical illustrations of every period for which he could find reference. However, while meticulous, he is never pompous: 'My ideal set of references for a uniform reconstruction would be (a) the relevant Dress Regulations; (B) an account of what was actually being worn, by somebody who wore it; (C) a sketch or photograph from life of it being worn; and (D) some surviving examples to study. And even then you would still only have my interpretation… Any policeman will tell you that even eyewitnesses rarely agree – people see things differently.'
Three-dimensional illustrations
In 1985-86 Gerry's work for the Institute took a new path, with the design, construction and installation of three-dimensional figures incorporating original arms and armour in a dramatic presentation for a permanent exhibition at Lenzburg Castle in Switzerland (which won a European prize). This coincided with Gerry's co-founding of a medieval re-enactment and 'living history' group based in Switzerland but with an international membership: the Company of Saynte George, which achieved what was generally acknowledged to be the highest standard of visual accuracy of any such group. (He remained as captain of the company for many years, organizing regular 'field' activities in Switzerland and France – most memorably for me, the week-long summer camps at Le Puy-en-Verlay in the Haute Loire in 1986-90. I shall always be grateful to him for introducing me to the heady delights of working with black-powder cannon.)
Gerry has long had dual British-Swiss nationality, thanks to his long residence (now on a plateau above the town of Biel/ Bienne) and his marriage to Anne, with whom he has a son, Sam, and a daughter, Camille. The reputation earned by the Company of Saynte George was such that in 2003 the foreign-born Gerry was commissioned as art director of the city of Berne's ten-day celebration of its historic foundation (given local sensibilities, this was a big deal). For this major event in the Swiss capital he organized a large medieval festival, with jousting displays and 'living history' presentations. This occasion also included an exhibition of the work of Time Machine AG, the company Gerry had founded in 1988 as a consequence of his experience working at Lenzburg.
Briefly, the 'USP' of the company was that it did not make 'shop-window dummies' for displaying existing historic costume, but designed and crafted complete costumed, equipped and armed life-size figures, with faces and hands cast from living models to produce an uncannily realistic appearance – the medium and methods used were so fine that the hands actually showed fingerprints. In time Gerry's figures would have prominent places in London's National Army Museum ('The Road to Waterloo' exhibition – perhaps most memorably, the Peninsular War figures inspired by Bridget Skiddy carrying her wounded husband Dan while their little boy struggled after them under the weight of his musket and pouch); and the Royal Armouries at Leeds (ranging from mounted and foot figures from the Battle of Pavia, 1525, to a British sahib shooting a tiger from the back of an elephant).

Изображение

14th-Century Rulers
MAA 500 Armies of Castile and Aragon 1370-1516
Working with the sculptor David Hayes, Gerry designed nine life-sized dioramas for the Royal Armouries Galleries at the Frazier Arms Museum in Louisville, KY. TMAG also made stunning figures of British, French, Colonial and Native American characters for 'Clash of Empires', an award-winning French-Indian War touring exhibition displayed at the Heinz Historical Center in Pittsburgh, PA, the Canadian War Museum in Ottawa, and the Smithsonian Institute in Washington, DC. (An unnecessary but typically TMAG touch was that for a figure of the young George Washington they actually sourced mud from the site of Fort Necessity, to make sure his boots were correctly stained!) In Europe, Time Machine also executed four major prehistorical exhibitions, and has provided figures for others as varied as pirates (in the Bahamas), and the history of the Isle of Man. As well as life-size subjects, including room interiors, TMAG also fulfilled museum and private commissions to make and install scale models of buildings, dioramas and figures.
And all this, while continuing to work as a jobbing illustrator for clients spread anywhere between Oxford and Taiwan.
Gerry is still painting, but tells me that he is now 'sliding gracefully into a welcome semi-retirement, to pursue those really important things I've never had time for.'
He is perfectly willing to pass a large part of his accumulated reference library to anyone who wants it enough to drive a suitable vehicle to Switzerland to collect it – but he cannot face sorting out and sending individual items on request. So, anyone with broad historical interests and a genuinely wholesale attitude should contact him via www.gerryembleton.com.
There follows a list of Gerry's books for Osprey:

Men-at- Arms titles illustrated by Gerry Embleton:
( Notes: dates & earliest series numbers are not in matching sequence, since numbers were added retrospectively in alphabetical order in about 1975.
* = Titles in which Gerry's son Sam Embleton also contributed to the artwork.)

MAA 39 The British Army in North America 1775-83 (1974)
MAA 43 Napoleon's German Allies (2): Nassau & Oldenburg (1976)
MAA 48 Wolfe's Army (1974)
MAA 50 Medieval European Armies (1975)
MAA 56 The Mexican-American War 1846-48 (1976)
MAA 58 The Landsknechts (1976)
MAA 63 The American Indian Wars 1860-90 (1977)
MAA 65 The Royal Navy 1790-1970 (1977)
MAA 66 Montgomery's Desert Army (1977)
MAA 67 The Indian Mutiny (1977)
MAA 75 Armies of the Crusades (1978)
MAA 79 Napoleon's Egyptian Campaign 1798-1801 (1978)
MAA 80 The German Army 1914-18 (1978)
MAA 81 The British Army 1914-18 (1978)
MAA 85 Saxon, Viking & Norman (1979)
MAA 94 The Swiss at War 1300-1500 (1979)
MAA 118 The Jacobite Rebellions 1689-1745 (1982)
MAA 129 Rome's Enemies (1): Germanics & Dacians (1982)
MAA 144 Armies of Medieval Burgundy 1364-1477 (1983)
MAA 145 The Wars of the Roses (1983)
MAA 267 The British Army 1660-1704 (1994)
MAA 286 The French Army 1914-18 (1995)
MAA 301 The Boer Wars (1) (1996)
MAA 303 The Boer Wars (2) (1996)
MAA 319 British Forces in North America 1793-1815 (1998)
MAA 373 The Sarmatians 600 BC-AD 450 (2002)
MAA 394 The German Army in World War I (1): 1914-15 (2003)
MAA 434 World War II German Police Units (2006)
MAA 439 The Canadian Corps in World War I (2007)
MAA 442 Queen Victoria's Highlanders (2007)
MAA 445 Medieval Polish Armies 966-1500 (2008)
MAA 450 American Loyalist Troops 1775-84 (2008) *
MAA 453 Armies of the East India Company 1750-1850 (2009)
MAA 460 Frederick the Great's Allies 1756-63 (2010) *
MAA 472 Armies of the Irish Rebellion 1798 (2011) *
MAA 476 Napoleon's Swiss Troops (2012) *
MAA 481 The Spanish Tercios 1536-1704 (2012)
MAA 483 Cumberland's Culloden Army 1745-46 (2012)
MAA 484 Portuguese in the Age of Discovery c.1340-1665 (2012)
MAA 491 Armies of the Volga Bulgars & Khanate of Khazan 9th-16th Centuries (2013)
MAA 494 Armies of the Hanseatic League 13th-15th Centuries (2014) *
MAA 496 Prussian Army of the Lower Rhine 1815 (2014)
MAA 500 Armies of Castile & Aragon 1370-1516 (2015)
MAA 505 Imperial Chinese Armies 1840-1911 (2016)
MAA 509 French Foreign Legion 1831-71 (2016) *
MAA 510 Dutch Armies of the 80 Years' War 1568-1648 (1) (2017) *
MAA 513 Dutch Armies of the 80 Years' War 1568-1648 (2) (2017) *

Elite titles:
ELI 147 Irish Regiments in the World Wars (2007)
ELI 174 American Civil War Guerrilla Tactics (2009) *
ELI 213 The Barbary Pirates 15th-17th Centuries (2016)

Warrior titles:
WAR 3 Viking Hersir 793-1066 (1993)
WAR 5 Anglo-Saxon Thegn 449-1066 (1993)
WAR 6 Confederate Infantryman 1861-65 (1993)
WAR 9 Late Roman Infantryman AD 236–565 (1994)
WAR 11 English Longbowman 1330-1515 (1995)
WAR 12 German Stormtrooper 1914-18 (1995)
WAR 42 Redcoat Officer 1740-1815 (2002)
WAR 49 Landsknecht Soldier 1486-1560 (2002)
WAR 54 Confederate Cavalryman 1861–65 (2002)
WAR 154 Border Reiver 1513-1603 (2011)


Потребителски аватар
Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България
Мнения: 14276
Регистриран: 02 яну 2012, 19:25

Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 12 юли 2018, 00:00

Blog
Blog

1. Konflikt '47: Defiance - The Italian Forces - 2018-07-11 13:59:48
Konflikt ’47: Defiance is the latest supplement to Warlord Games’ Weird World War II ruleset, taking players to the war-torn Mediterranean and introducing full army lists for the divided Italian forces.
The Italians present a number of unique opportunities for Konflikt ’47 players. They retain the flamboyant forces familiar to historical gamers, but each part of the divided nation now has access to Rift-tech units and equipment to further characterise their forces. The small number of partisans and guerrillas also provide the opportunity for additional variety. Finally, each force can include a unit of Allied or Axis advisors or technical specialists to represent the Allied and Axis efforts to bolster and integrate the Italians into their forces. The Italian Social Republic
With the nation of Italy divided, many members of the Italian Armed Forces continue to believe in the socialist cause under Mussolini. Backed by the powerful German war machine, the ENR has been re-organised to take advantages in the Rift-tech developments provided by the Germans. Manning strong defensive positions across the middle of Italy, they present a formidable obstacle to Allied ambitions to threaten the underbelly of Germany. They have maintained much of the uniform and equipment form before the national divide but have embraced newer Rift-tech equipment and German training to become a more resilient and reliable defensive force. The ENR’s lack of mechanised equipment and associated doctrine is more than compensated by the infantry-heavy demands of its battlefields.

Изображение

Miniatures available from Warlord Games. The Kingdom of Italy
This Kingdom of Italy is based upon the troops and equipment available to Italian forces loyal to King Victor Emmanuel III, and commanded by the government of Marshal Pietro Badoglio. The ECI has been rebuilt around a core of experienced veterans, many of whom fought in Africa. The Allies have bolstered this force with thousands of released POWs and equally massive stocks of military supplies. The ECI is keen to prove its worth to the Allies but its worth to the Allies but is predominantly motivated by its desire to liberate the rest of Italy from German occupation. The ECI is keen to develop more and heavier mechanised forces but the nature of the likely battlefields will demand a highly trained infantry core to the army.

Изображение

Miniatures available from Warlord Games.
Alongside these new army lists, Konflikt '47: Defiance includes new and updated rules, background information, expanded unit lists for existing forces, and even a mini-campaign. Order your copy today!


Потребителски аватар
Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България
Мнения: 14276
Регистриран: 02 яну 2012, 19:25

Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 13 юли 2018, 00:00

Blog
Blog

1. Last Days Campaign Playthrough: The Scavengers - 2018-07-12 09:07:58
The Last Days: Zombie Apocalypse campaign continues, with Ash Barker and Owen from Gaming with the Cooler heading to the suburbs in search of supplies. Unfortunately there doesn't seem to be enough to go around - I'm sure they can come to some sort of amicable agreement...

Last Days: Zombie Apocalypse is a skirmish game of survival horror, in which players control small groups of survivors battling against rival gangs and zombies to make it through another day. Order your copy today!


Потребителски аватар
Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България
Мнения: 14276
Регистриран: 02 яну 2012, 19:25

Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 18 юли 2018, 00:00

Blog
Blog

1. Burrows & Badgers - Sculpting a Badger Mage - 2018-07-16 08:02:59
Burrows & Badgers is a skirmish wargame of anthropomorphic animals. Players lead warbands of creatures, from shrews and mice to badgers and foxes, and fight for their place in the Kingdom of Northymbra. Miniatures for the game can be found on the Oathsworn Miniatures website.
When people ask me what my job is, I tell them I'm a sculptor. But to be honest, other stuff keeps getting in the way… there's only myself and my wife Jo running Oathsworn, so everything from games design to order packing needs to be covered by one of us. And we've been busy lately, which means that I haven't sculpted anything since the end of January.
So, after a six month break from sculpting, I wasn't even sure I'd still remember how to do it…
But we're a miniatures company, so we need new miniatures. Time to dig out the putty!
The plan was to do another Kickstarter to fund a set of new models; generally we do ten to fifteen at a time. I started by making a list of potential ideas:
1. Squirrel archer, male. Rogue-ish, Robin of Sherwood type.
2. Mage, female. Either fox or otter, either will work for the pose I have planned.
3. Badger mage, male. Old, wizened, scrawny, robes.
4. Beaver, male. It's been suggested that the beaver should be a mage, but I'm leaning towards a ruffian / brigand leader type.
5. Massive Raptor - either Osprey, Red Kite or Buzzard.
6. Massive Hound, male – Staffordshire Bull Terrier probably, or maybe a Border Collie instead. I'm picturing armour and a tabard / surcoat.
7. Weasel, male, with a blunderbuss. Similar to the picture on page 38 of the Burrows & Badgers rulebook.
8. Cat, male. Landsknecht style. Maybe a two handed sword, maybe a halberd?
9. Wildcat, female, in Highland Clan gear.
10. Shrew or Squirrel, female, in Highland Clan gear.
11. Mouse, male, helmet, armour, surcoat and crossbow.
12. Kestrel - Not certain on this one; I have a pose in my head, and if I can make it work, it'll be great. If not, I'll pretend it never happened, and sculpt a different bird instead...
13. Frog of some kind - probably a soldier/fighter type.
14. Bat assassin.
15. Shrew-zerker, similar to the picture on the last page of the rulebook.
I thought I'd start with the male Badger mage; he'd be a big (45mm+) sculpt, and I guessed the large size would make it good way to ease myself back into sculpting.
I started by getting all my tools ready. I use a fairly small number of tools; a chisel point Clay Shaper (size 0), a Zahle dental tool (commonly called a Wax carver No.5, or an SG dental), an old scalpel blade stuck to a lolly stick and a piece of bent wire stuck into an old paintbrush handle. These cover about 99% of my sculpting needs; but you can really use anything you like as a sculpting tool - if it makes the mark you are looking for, then use it! In terms of putties, I use mostly Polymeric Systems Kneadatite Yellow/Blue, more commonly known as Greenstuff, which is a two part epoxy putty, originally made for plumbers to fix pipes! I also use Brownstuff, from the same manufacturer, which is slightly less elastic and can be filed and sanded. I find Milliput to be useful as well, mostly for bulking out large pieces, or making weapons and bases.

Изображение

I drew out a very rough sketch of the badger mage idea; I don't usually do this, and given how little the finished sculpt looks like the concept sketch, that's probably a good thing!

Изображение

I started the sculpting process by bending some brass wire and attaching a blob of Greenstuff, to provide a basis for sculpting the head. This was left to cure.

Изображение

Then, using .51mm brass wire, some clippers and some pliers, and started making an armature; I twisted two lengths of wire together, then bent the limbs to shape, and posed the armature. At this point there was no wire for the tail; I usually add that later.

Изображение

I also attached the armature to a base at this point; all the Burrows & Badgers miniatures have integral bases, which I make using equal parts of Greenstuff and Milliput. This makes the base tough without being brittle; otherwise it can bend or snap during the mouldmaking process. I press a blob of putty flat on a sheet of acetate; it's one of the few things that it doesn't stick to!
I texture the surface with a stone, and I also press the armature's leg wires into the base to make holes; the base can be very hard to drill through, and marking the holes first like this makes it much easier. Once the base has cured, it can just be peeled off the acetate.

Изображение

I attached the armature to one of my sculpting blocks next. The sculpting block is just a couple of pieces of wood, held together with a nut and bolt. Many sculptors use corks instead, but I've always found them to be unstable, and a part-finished sculpt falling over is definitely something you want to avoid! The sculpting block is a much more solid, stable way to hold the armature.

Изображение

I started bulking out the body armature at this point; I kept it quite rough, because it would all be covered by fur and clothing. I added a piece of wire for the tail at this point. I also started thinking about altering the pose; I thought maybe smoking a pipe would be better than pointing, so I bent the arm to a 'pipe-holding' position.

Изображение

Obviously, this meant I'd need a pipe! So, I bent some more brass wire, and mixed some Brownstuff, and made the rough shape of the bowl, let that cure, then sculpted over it to complete the pipe.

Изображение

Next, I sculpted the badger's head. I took the cured head armature, and added a couple of blobs of fresh putty for the eyes. Then I added two more blobs to form the cheeks; and a thin layer over the top of the head. Next I added some larger bits of putty to the back lower quarters of the head, to form the bulk of the jaw. I blended this all together using the Clay Shaper.
Then, using the sharp edge of my Wax 5, I cut in a line for his mouth, and marked in the shape of his eyes, pushing the putty up and down to form the eyelids. I used the Clay Shaper to smooth and refine the eye area, then added a couple of lumps of putty for ears, and a little more bulk to the back of the jaw area. I continued to tidy and refine the head, and added a tiny bit of putty for the nose.
Next, I used the blunt end of the Wax 5 to pull the putty downwards to rough in the fur, the used the sharp end to refine each section of fur to add definition.

Изображение

Once the head was fully cured, I drilled a hole into the badger's body, and fitted the head armature's wire into it, and bent it around until I was happy with the position.

Изображение

With the head in place, I test-fitted the pipe, which turned out to be way too long to fit between his hand and his mouth… so I made a shorter one.

Изображение

Of course, a little pipe doesn't take much putty, and I'd mixed up far too much. So rather than let it go to waste, I used it to start on the badger's staff. I rolled the putty into a thin sausage, pressed it onto the staff armature wire with my fingers, smoothed it with he Clay Shaper, then used the Wax 5 to cut in lines for the wood grain. I only had enough putty mixed to get about halfway down, but that was OK – if I'd done the whole thing, it would have made sculpting the feet harder.

Изображение

At this point, I got nervous about the pose again. I thought the pipe would be OK, but I thought he looked good with the hand down too. In the end, I decided on the pipe, and started filing it down to reduce the size and get it smooth.

Изображение

With the pipe filed down, I glued it to his hand with superglue. You have to be careful with superglue; many mould rubbers react badly to it, and it liquifies and foams badly under the heat and pressure of the vulcanising process. In this case though, it would be fine, as the superglue would be entirely encased in putty, so not anywhere near the mould surface.

Изображение

I moved onto sculpting the hands; I pressed a lump on putty into place, then cut lines in for the fingers, and used the Clay Shaper to gradually refine them. Then I cut a line across for the claws, and continued gently smoothing the fingers, shaping them to show joints and knuckles. Finally I added a thin sausage of putty for a thumb.

Изображение

The other hand followed the same process.

Изображение

Next I started on the lower body, with the feet. Again, a lump of putty was pressed into place on the front of the foot armature, and another added behind to form the heel and ankle joint. Lines were cut in with the Wax 5 for the toes and claws, and the whole thing smoothed and tidied with the Clay Shaper. It's a pretty simple process, but you have to be gentle and take your time.

Изображение

I continued working up the leg; pressing putty onto the armature, then roughing in the fur pattern. I then spent some time gradually refining each separate bit of fur, with the sharp end of the Wax 5.

Изображение

I did the same with the other leg; then used the same process to do the tail.

Изображение

Once the legs were fully cured, I mixed some more Brownstuff and finished the badgers's staff. The sculpt looks a bit odd at this stage, but from here on will start to take shape fairly quickly, as large areas of clothing get added.

Изображение

I started adding sleeves; they were very simply pressed into place, smoothed, and then some light creases and folds were marked in.

Изображение

One important factor when sculpting a miniature for production is making it castable; and that means voids and undercuts should be avoided. There was a void between the lower part of the staff and the foot, so I decided to add a section of loincloth to fill it. I added some lumps of putty, blended them together with the Wax 5, then smoothed them with the Clay Shaper, and finally marked in some folds.

Изображение

Next I added the lower sections of his robe; again, I added some lumps of putty, blended them together with the Wax 5, then smoothed them with the Clay Shaper, and finally marked in some folds, and marked in a few cuts and holes to make the robe look old and worn.

Изображение

Often I'd add a belt at this point, but I didn't want one here, as I felt it would just detract from the folds in the robe. So I assumed the robe had a thin belt or cord tying it, which would be hidden by the folds of the upper part of the robe.
I added more putty for the upper portion, and gradually pulled it downwards until I was happy with the look, then smoothed and tidied it.

Изображение

Then I added the robe's sleeves; the process was the same, putty pressed into place, blended together, smoothed, then folds were added.

Изображение

Next, I gave him a scarf. I rolled out some sausages of putty, and wrapped three of hem around his neck. I added a lump of putty for the scarf's knot, then a couple of strips for ends of the scarf. I then did a bit of careful blending and smoothing on it, and cut in lines for the tassled ends.

Изображение

At this point, the miniature still had a large void between his arm and his staff. Thankfully he also needed a bit of equipment adding anyway, so I used that to fill the gap. A shoulder bag and a scroll filled the gap pretty well.

Изображение

I also went back to the loincloth area; it had served the purpose of making the miniature easier to mould and cast, but I wasn't happy with the way it looked. So I extended it across the miniature further, which helped to improve the balance a lot.

Изображение

Finally, I wanted this badger to be an old, wise brock; so I thought a bit of extra hair might help give that impression. I added small amounts of putty to the back of his head and lower jaw, then worked them into shape.

Изображение

And that was the job finished; after a six month hiatus, I've finally sculpted a new miniature!

Изображение

Want to take to the battlefields of Northymbra? Order your copy of Burrows & Badgers today, and pick up some great miniatures from Oathsworn Miniatures!


Отговори

Върни се в “Новости от производителите на модели / Manufacturers' news”