Новини - литература и периодика

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simo
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Новини - литература и периодика

Мнение от simo » 31 дек 2017, 20:28

Продължаваме новините от издатели на моделистка литература и периодика в нова тема.
Симеон Иванов (simo)
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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 04 яну 2018, 00:00

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1. January's Book Vote and Last Month's Results - 2018-01-03 12:20:00
Happy New Year everyone! We hope you have a successful and happy 2018. A new year means a new month, and with that comes a new book vote. January's book vote is focusing on our X-Planes series, so if you're a fan of experimental aircraft and high-tech military prototypes, this is one for you!
Below is a list of the options. Have a read of the descriptions and click the link to make your vote!
XPL - Research Jets of World War II
XPL - Avro CF-105 Arrow
XPL - Parasite Fighters 1910s-1950s
XPL - Cold War Jet Seaplanes XPL - Lockheed AH-56 Cheyenne

Research Jets of World War II
While World War II raged, pioneering aircraft and engine designers were busy developing the world’s first practical jet-powered research aircraft, to test and prove the new technology. This book would examine the aircraft that paved the way for Germany’s Me 262 and Britain’s Meteor, including the Heinkel He 178 and He 280, Caproni Campini N.1, and Gloster E.28/39, F.9/37 and E.1/44.
Avro CF-105 Arrow
The Avro Arrow is one of the great Cold War ‘what-ifs’. Designed to be Canada’s interceptor of the 1950s and beyond, the Arrow was a delta-winged design with an internal weapons bay and a pioneering stability augmentation system and early fly-by-wire controls. But like Britain’s TSR2, development was expensive and orders for hi-tech military aircraft were mired in politics. In 1959, with no foreign orders forthcoming, the Arrow was cancelled – killing the most advanced fighter of the 1950s, and Avro Canada with it.
Parasite Fighters 1910s-1950s
Usually small, agile, and short-range, ‘parasite fighters’ allow long-range aircraft to carry and launch their own escorts. The first concepts coupled high-performance biplane fighters to airship motherships, which enabled fighters to be launched already at altitude and far from land bases. World War II saw the relatively successful Soviet Zveno experiments, with Tupolev heavy bombers carrying Polikarpov fighters-bombers. The new strategic bombers of the 1950s brought renewed efforts, with the tiny XF-85 Goblin the most famous, before aerial refuelling and the dawn of the SAM made the concept redundant.
Cold War Jet Seaplanes
An ingenious solution to the problems operating early jets from carrier decks, jet-powered seaplane fighters had a brief moment in the limelight in the late 1940s and early ’50s. Britain’s Saunders-Roe SR./A.1 and America’s Convair F2Y Sea Dart were built to develop the concept, and the Sea Dart became the world’s first and only supersonic seaplane. Meanwhile, Martin developed the P6M Seamaster as a jet-powered flying boat strategic bomber, and Beriev in the Soviet Union designed a series of jet flying boats through the rest of the Cold War.
Lockheed AH-56 Cheyenne
The US Army’s first dedicated attack helicopter, the AH-56 was a fast, single-engined compound helicopter of the 1960s, designed from the ground up to use the most advanced anti-armour weapons available. As the Vietnam War intensified, the Huey-based AH-1 Cobra was brought into service, meant to be an interim gunship while the problems with the Cheyenne and its novel rotor systems were ironed out. But by 1972, following a fatal crash, the programme was cancelled. The experience of the Cheyenne project was put to use in the replacement programme, which produced the very successful but more conventional AH-64 Apache.
Make your vote by clicking here!
We had an incredibly close book vote in December, with just 0.34% difference between the winning option and second place. December's book vote looked at our Campaign series, and received a great response from all of you. However, in first place with 25.56% of the vote was Ia Drang 1965. This was followed by Kokoda 1942 with the very respectable 25.22%. See below the full results, and thank you to everyone who took the time to vote. CAM - Leuctra 371 BC 15.74% CAM - Dyrrachium 1081–83 20.65% CAM - Lake Erie 1813 12.83% CAM - Kokoda 1942 25.22% CAM - Ia Drang 1965 25.56%


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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 11 яну 2018, 00:01

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1. Dracula's America - New Factions in the Hunting Grounds - 2018-01-10 08:04:00
For more information about the game from the author himself, check out Jonathan Haythornthwaite's designer blog.

Hunting Grounds is the first expansion for Dracula’s America: Shadows of the West, and introduces a host of extras for your existing Posses. Alongside these additional items and Arcane Powers is a new Narrative Campaign, special rules allowing players to take the battle into the Hunting Grounds, and two new factions, but what do these new Posses bring to the tabletop? The Forsaken

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The Accursed, vicious monsters that fight for the Forsaken
Artwork by aRU-MOR
The Forsaken are the remnants of Custer’s 7th Cavalry, now cursed to become uncontrollable were-beasts after the battle of Little Big Horn. Two non-Hired Gun models in your Posse will become Accursed, becoming monstrous beasts that fight for you on the battlefield, but could well turn against you if things start to go wrong.
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Order the Forsaken Posse from Northstar Military Figures here. The Shadow Dragon Tong

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One of the Guilao ('Ghost-Men') of the Shadow Dragon Tong
Artwork by aRU-MOR
The Shadow Dragon Tong is a secretive organisation whose will is enforced by lethal martial artists with a sinister connection to the spirit realms. Players choosing this faction will see two of their models become Guilao (‘Ghost-Men’) – Supernatural, Ethereal warriors that stick to the ancient martial traditions of their ancestors. Members can also benefit from Animus-ink Tattoos, granting the bearer special supernatural abilities to aid them on the battlefield.
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Order the Shadow Dragon Tong Posse from Northstar Military Figures here.
Will either of these factions be making their way to your tabletop?
Dracula's America: Shadows of the West: Hunting Grounds will be released on 25 January, making the Weird West just that little bit weirder. Preorder your copy today!


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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 13 яну 2018, 00:00

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1. Designer Blog - Creating Games with Peer Sylvester - 2018-01-12 09:07:38
So far I have been published three games with Osprey Games. Three games – quite a lucky streak! Especially if you consider that the three games, The King is Dead, Let Them Eat Cake and The Lost Expedition are very different kinds of games. I thought it would be interesting in this blog to look at the design process behind each of them.

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The Concept
I don’t know if it is an international concept, but in Germany boardgamers like to divide game designers into two groups: storytellers and watch makers. Storytellers start with a theme, whilst watch makers start with a mechanism, and while I am sure that a lot of designers fall neatly into one of these categories, I do not. I started The Lost Expedition and The King is Dead with a theme and Let Them Eat Cake with a mechanism.
When approaching a new game, I like to say that I start with the idea. That can be a theme or a specific mechanism, but could also be something very vague, such as ‘a game about dealing with grief’ or ‘a trivia game without questions’. If the idea seems appealing to me, I’ll start to brainstorm and see if it leads anywhere. If it doesn’t I’ll write it down for later, but if it does then the design process has already begun!
The Design Process
As with the idea of storytellers and watch makers, when it comes to the design process there are two different approaches – bottom-top and top-bottom. With the latter you start by imagining what could be in the game and try to connect all of those into a working game, whilst with bottom-top you start with the bare minimum and only add what you absolutely have to.
The King is Dead, Let Them Eat Cake, and The Lost Expedition are all bottom-top designs.
It’s probably obvious with The King is Dead, as there are very few rules. My concept was a game where you struggle for power, but want to show a united front to outside powers or someone else (i.e. The Saxons) will grasp power. I thought a majority system would work best, as the lack of direct conflict plays into my idea of a ‘united front’. Then I chose two core mechanisms: using only 8 actions and the follower system where you have to weaken some of the factions on the board and gain influence with the others. That was the starting ground, with everything else building up from there.

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The basic concept of Let Them Eat Cake was ‘mean voting/negotiation game where everybody has the same votes’. Again, I started at the bottom and tried to create a logical chain of things to vote for: someone to break ties, someone to reduce the power of another player (guillotine operator), someone to distribute the goods and someone that decides if people actually get the goods distributed to them. The goal was to create an environment that allows for the maximum amount of negotiation. Again, the rest grew from there, although an extra element was needed and the generals are a result of that – this was more of a Top Bottom approach where I asked myself ‘in a coup, what else could happen and how?’.
For The Lost Expedition I started with the theme. I liked the idea of having cards with the events that would happen, and the core mechanism was the morning phase (the evening phase came later, when I decided that players would have to use all their cards). The icons came from the theme, but I tried not to use too many, just what is needed to create different cards that feel thematic, but where each icon has their own “character”. Use too many resources and they either all feel the same or some are clearly better than others. Again, I build the game upwards from that starting point.
Please note that I'm not saying this method is superior to the alternative – it is just the way that works best for me!
Keep playing!
Peer


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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 16 яну 2018, 00:01

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1. Kobolds and Cobblestones - A Wargame with a Twist! - 2018-01-15 08:55:48
Hello, it’s Rob here the creator of Kobolds & Cobblestones. This will be the first of a few blogs explaining the background behind the game. To start things off I’ll be explaining one of the core concepts of Kobolds & Cobblestones: card-based gameplay. And for that, let’s travel back in time to a rainy night in Nottingham…
I had been playing a lot of different skirmish games at my local club (the wonderful War & Peace) and I was getting a little frustrated with my exceptionally poor dice rolls. No matter the roll, they always seemed to fail me. So, that got me thinking: if only there was a way to know how good my dice rolls were in advance. Of course, apart from having some sort of telepathic abilities to predict the outcome, this was a complete lost cause.

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Instead, I remembered the numerous poker games I’d played over the years. With poker you have the ability to see how strong your hand is before going up against an opponent. But there’s also the opportunity to bluff against your foe with a weaker hand - something you can’t really do with a dice roll. Of course, your opponent could be bluffing too, so there’s still that element of unpredictability (a little like dice-based combat). At this point a light went off in my head as I considered combining the two.
Around this time I also had a long commute, so I spent this time wisely devising a system that could combine the two styles of gameplay. The basic idea was to give each player a hand of cards that they could use during combat instead of more typical dice rolls. In order to determine the victor, both would play poker hands and the strongest would be the winner. For example, one player could lay down four cards to play two pairs, while their opponent might only have a pair, which would mean they would lose.
Both players compare the hands that have been played (using a handy chart of poker hands at the back of the book) and the difference between the strength of the hands played is the number of wounds caused.
However, I also wanted to ensure there was a mix of weak and strong units to keep players on their toes. As a result, although the player always has a hand of at least five cards that they can use to create their poker ‘attacks’, weaker characters can only play a maximum of two cards (so they’re restricted to a pair) while stronger characters can play up to five cards, potentially unlocking the legendary royal flush.
Of course, Kobolds & Cobblestones is based around the dodgy criminal gangs of Ordinsport, so you don’t always have to play fair. For each ally you have in contact with the same enemy, you can play an extra card in your hand. This means if you’re able to swarm the opponent with ‘runts’ you can play a full five cards and overwhelm even the strongest of foe.
Just like poker, there’s also a strong element of bluffing involved. You see in combat, both players lay down cards - one to attack and one to defend. In the example above, the player could have swarmed round the opponent so it looked like they were about to play a strong hand. In order to defend against this potential powerful strike, the defending player attempts to block it by playing a strong hand, e.g. a full house or straight. However, this was all a ruse by the attacker because they had no intention of playing a strong hand themselves. Instead they just wanted to force their opponent to ‘waste’ a strong hand.
CRITICAL HITS

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Alongside this, you’ve also got the potential to trigger Critical Hits during combat. This could be something as simple as causing extra damage or knocking someone down, to more complicated aspects like dodging away or poisoning a foe.
Critical Hits are triggered depending upon the colour of the cards you play. In Ordinsport the classic fantasy races (orcs, elves, ratmen, goblins, etc.) are all meant to be living in perfect harmony, but old habits die hard and the past has a tendency to raise its ugly head. As a result, traditionally ‘good’ races (elves, humans, dwarfs, etc.) trigger Critical Hits when playing red cards (hearts and diamonds) while ‘bad’ races (goblins, orcs, undead, ratmen, etc.) trigger Critical Hits when playing black cards (spades and clubs).
The more cards you play that match a character’s allegiance, the stronger the Critical Hit will be. For example, an Ogre can ‘Grab’ an opponent by playing one red card, knock over an opponent by playing two red cards or cause an extra wound by playing three red cards. Meanwhile, a Ratman Assassin gains the Evade ability by playing one black card, can Dodge out of combat by playing two black cards or cause a Poison Cloud by playing four black cards.
This means that along with trying to play the strongest hand possible, you’ve also got to try and keep an eye on the colour to trigger those all-important Critical Hits.
Well, I hope you enjoyed that brief look at how card-based combat works in Kobolds & Cobbletones. However, that’s only the start of the game mechanics and in future blogs, we’ll look at how to build your gang, using magic spells and explaining a bit more about the setting of Ordinsport.
Kobolds & Cobblestones: Fantasy Gang Rumbles will be out on 25 January. Preorder your copy today!


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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 17 яну 2018, 00:00

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1. Radar and Aces - 2018-01-16 15:45:00
This month we're publishing the first books in our Air Campaign series, which looks at how history's greatest air wars were planned and fought, and why they were won and lost. One of the first books in the series is Rabaul 1943-44 by Mark Lardas, which follows the Allied air campaign on the major Japanese base, Rabaul, during World War II.
Today on the blog, Mark Lardas returns, with an anecdote about a Marine Corps fighter ace who helped piece together the story of Rabaul.
One of the delights of writing a book for Osprey is the aha! moment. That is the moment where apparently unrelated facts come together and reveal the answer to some puzzling inconsistency. Sometimes these moments change the book. Other times they provide an answer to a nagging question.
In Rabaul 1943–44, one such moment centered on the death of a Marine fighter ace.

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Robert M. Hanson was a Marine Corps fighter ace who flew in Marine Fighter Squadron VMF-215. He was credited with 25 kills before dying in combat.
I say credited because many of his claimed kills occurred while he was flying alone. He was a legitimate ace, indeed at least a double ace, and possibly a triple ace. During combat Hanson’s wingmen would lose him, and Hanson would return to base solo, claiming multiple kills. On one occasion Hanson claimed five kills on one mission – ace in a day. The problem was the Japanese only lost three planes that day.
Hanson definitely shot down one that day, witnessed by his wingman among others. (His other four claimed kills occurred while he was flying alone.) His wingman shot down a second. A third was shot down by another member of VMF-215. VMF-215 claimed a total of 13 Japanese aircraft that day, so Hanson was not the only pilot claiming kills that could not have happened.
But Hanson made a habit of claiming multiple kills while solo and unwitnessed. His explanation to junior members of the squadron was that he hid in clouds until he spotted a lone Japanese aircraft, and would then pounce. There were too few Japanese aircraft available to be shot down to justify Hanson’s kill rate. Hanson’s squadron commander became curious. He assigned an experienced pilot as Hanson’s wingman with orders to stick to Hanson. It worked for most of one mission – and Hanson got no kills. Then Hanson shook off his wingman and went solo.
Hanson’s wingman intended to report Hanson’s behavior, but the report was moot by the time the wingman returned. Hanson had caught up with the rest of the squadron. He had then been shot down and killed strafing a building at Cape St. George on the southern tip of New Ireland. Hanson would be awarded a posthumous Medal of Honor and suddenly the issue of inflated kill claims was not only irrelevant – it was embarrassing.
According to contemporary press reports Hanson was killed “attempting to destroy a lighthouse that often gave the fighter group trouble by firing flak at the fighter group as they passed the lighthouse.”
That explanation made no sense to me. It smelled. Why risk fighter aircraft to knock out an easily avoided flak position? Yet that lighthouse was frequently attacked over the course of the campaign. It seemed obvious the antiaircraft artillery was at and around the lighthouse to protect something.
It could not be the lighthouse. Lighthouses are important navigation landmarks, but not during wartime. Their lights are doused, especially in a war zone. But something was near that lighthouse, something so secret its presence could not be mentioned at the time. Whatever it was, it was important at the time, but not important enough to merit attention after the war had passed it by.
Authors run into a lot of those types of puzzles researching books. Hanson’s death was peripheral to the larger tale of reducing Rabaul, so I left it unsolved, and left the whole puzzle out of the book. The answer came later, researching Japanese air defenses, specifically their early warning radar network.
Japan invested a lot into the defense of Rabaul, including over a third of the Imperial Navy’s available early warning radar units. These had an effective range of 150 miles (for formations of aircraft). They placed one radar site at the southern tip of New Ireland, next to the lighthouse. This station provided Rabaul an extra thirty minutes warning of any air raid coming from Bougainville. This was my aha! moment.

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Japanese radar installation on Betio Island, Tarawa Atoll In early 1943 radar was still one of war’s secrets. Censors routinely cropped photographs of warships to cut off the radar and HFDF antennas on top of the masts. Press discussion of radar was discouraged. RAF publicity officers issued press releases explaining their night fighter pilots were fed carrots for improved night vision to avoid mentioning airborne radar. It was then a Big Secret. Many, civilian as well as military, knew about radar. Just like sex in the 1940s, radar was then something polite people did not discuss in public. If there was no official public discussion of Allied radar and radar capabilities, there was not going to be any discussion of Axis radar. (It avoided the embarrassing issue of why, when the Axis had radar, didn’t the Allies have radar?)

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The Cape St. George radar station would have been a priority target. It was frequently the target of dive bombing raids. Radar stations are notoriously hard to knock out by bombing. Usually they can be quickly repaired. Thus it would also have been a target of opportunity for homeward bound fighters with extra ammunition. (The Allies ruled the sky south of Cape St. George, so being low on ammunition was not a big risk.)
However, it would have been a target the Japanese would have defended tenaciously. They had plenty of anti-aircraft artillery when they installed the radar station, and used generous amounts to protect the station. The St. George lighthouse would have made an excellent flak tower, as well as a noticeable landmark. Attacking it would have been risky, but certainly worth risking an aircraft or two. Knocking it out, even for a day or two, would ultimately save more aircraft.
Hanson’s death caused a problem, however. Hanson was then a famous fighter ace, the most famous ace in the theater when he died. His death would make the news. To protect the radar secret, it was reported he died attacking the flak trap at St. George Point – a literally true, but incomplete explanation.
By the time the radar was no longer a secret, Hanson was yesterday’s news. No “now it can be told” stories were written to update the story of his death. No one felt the need. He went into the history books as the man killed attacking a lighthouse.
ACM 2: Rabaul 1943-44 is available to pre-order and will be published 25 January 2018.


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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 18 яну 2018, 00:00

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1. Let's Play Dracula's America - Guerilla Miniature Games - 2018-01-17 08:19:18
With the first supplement for Dracula's America: Shadows of the West coming out later this month, some of you may be wondering whether it's time to bring the Weird West to your tabletop. This playthrough video will give you a great introduction to how the game works, with Ash from Guerilla Miniature Games taking control of the Red Hand Coven and Owen from Gaming with the Cooler leading the Crossroads Cult.



Dracula's America: Shadows of the West by Jonathan Haythornthwaite can be ordered here. The first supplement, Hunting Grounds, is available for preorder and will be released on the 25th of January.


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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 19 яну 2018, 00:00

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1. Phones down temporarily - 2018-01-18 11:14:49
Our phoneline may be down temporarily, so if you are struggling to reach us, please email any website/order issues to websiteorders@ospreypublishing.com.
We aim to have this fixed soon.
Thank you for your patience.


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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 24 яну 2018, 00:00

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1. Designer Blog - Creating Star Cartel - 2018-01-23 09:35:00
Martin Boisselle, the designer behind Star Cartel, talks about his approach to game design and how he came to create the space trading game.
I get my ideas for games from different sources. A simple documentary on spinach farming in New Zealand may trigger an innate desire to translate that theme into a game, for example. I tend to control these urges, but sometimes, when the impulse is too strong, the game designing part of my brain just kicks in ferociously.
The first part, as described above, is finding a theme, a perspective, a setting. Once that is set, I’ll try to deconstruct it into smaller parts. Each of those parts needs a mechanism to translate it to the game state, and now that we have more and more designers pushing the envelope of game design, that language (mechanisms) is far more complex than it used to be. Ten years ago, new mechanisms were rich in possibilities, but these days it’s hard to find a brand new idea. Usually it is a riff on an old one.

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One mechanism that I enjoy using is the stock market. Cardtainer (the original name of Star Cartel) had to have one, since it was one of my goals with the design. There are many different types of stock markets: linear, bi-dimensional (18xx), random manipulations, player manipulations… I didn’t want a random element in the stock market. Players should be able to manipulate it via their choices. Games like Stockpile use cards to influence the market, where some cards are known to each player while one card is revealed at the end of the round to further manipulate the market. I find that sort of influence less interesting, as randomness should never dictate the finality of the game. It can present interesting situations where players can react to it, but should never resolve anything.
With the stock market, having “objects” moving on it presented more choices. Either they can be company values, where shares can provide dividends, or they can be a commodity market. I opted for a hybrid of both. In essence, the market marks the value of each commodity throughout the game, but the end scoring borrows from stock and dividends. I had decided to keep it simple with the number of commodities, and 5 of them seemed like a nice variety. I experimented with more, but in the end it did not help the ease of play.
To manipulate those commodities, I knew from the get-go that I needed a way to fill ships and that those ships would have a limit on their capacity. Infinity is quite interesting in concept but it lacks focus. Thus, the ship limits were a way to ramp up the scoring abilities, while keeping the pace in the game. Larger cargo takes more space, but larger ships take more cargo. Players can then decide the timing of their game, and what to do with it. Market crashes are also a nice touch and I decided early on that the market had to be able to drop the value of a commodity if players pushed it too far. In that, indirect teamplay is not always a path to victory, as your opponent can see your push for a certain commodity and crush your dreams with a simple push above the “9” space of the market...

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A fellow Canadian boardgame designer, Philippe Beaudoin, told me once that players need things to automate by themselves, to alleviate the choices a player need to focus on. From that point on, most of my games have automated parts in them, as Star Carteldoes. The limiting choices on your turn are the direct result of that thinking. On their turn, players can load cargo if there’s space on their ship, or if they cannot load a cargo card, they deliver their cargo. The only real choice is to decide which of the cargo cards they take. If they completely fill up their ship, the game automates the delivery part of the game. Players can still have a decision in that delivery if multiple commodities are tied, but in essence the games rolls on without major decisions being made by the player. Even the ship upgrade done automatically.
As for the adjustments that Filip, Duncan and I made when we developed the game further, most of it was pruning. The theme changed to a galactic one, and some further changes were made, like the different powers of ships, the number of cards for each type and their values. All in all, it was really easy working with these guys even with an ocean separating us. I sometimes wonder what we could’ve done if I had been in Oxford with them. But my ship is in dire need of repairs and the Star Cartel has been harassing me with a lucrative delivery of medkits and illegal shrubs from Alpha Gorlogon-5. I hope it brings in enough credit to upgrade my ship and finally get out of this dingy cantina, once and for all!
Star Cartel is a 3-6 player space trading game published in October 2017. Order your copy today!


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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 25 яну 2018, 00:00

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1. Kobolds and Cobblestones - Creating your Gang - 2018-01-24 09:33:02
Rob Burman, author of Kobolds & Cobblestones: Fantasy Gang Rumbles, is back with another blog looking at the upcoming game. This time we're exploring how players create their gangs.
In today’s blog we’re going to look briefly at how to create your gang of miscreants. However, before we get into the nitty gritty of gang creation, it’s worth giving you a little bit of background about the setting in Kobolds & Cobblestones.
The game is set in a fantasy city called Ordinsport - which is kind of like a cross between the docks of somewhere like Grimsby and the cobbled, narrow streets of the Shambles in York (great inspiration for a Kobolds & Cobblestones table for anyone who is interested!). Ordinsport is part of a wider fantasy world that was once wracked by war. Opposing factions would fight across epic battlefields with scores and scores of troops clashing weapon against weapon. Eventually though, all that scrapping gets a bit tedious and the warring factions gathered together and decided to give peace a chance.

As a result Ordinsport became a city where previous enemies could live together in relative harmony. Goblins share bars with dwarves, orcs do odd jobs for elves, ratmen clean the sewers of rich men, etc. Necromancers are still a bit odd though. Despite this quest for peace, the town planners kept on an eye on the past. As a result the traditionally ‘good’ races took up residence in the more respectable part of town known as the Red Streets, while the ‘bad’ guys chose the Dark Port.
Although Ordinsport was meant to be a glittering example of the future, it has ended up being a melting pot for miscreants, mischief makers and murderers. Now gang bosses have the pick of any ne’er-do-well they please - from lowly goblins to thuggish Ogres and plenty in between. Getting the Gang Together
All this means that when you’re creating your gang, you’re not restricted to one race! That’s right, if you want a Dwarf leader, accompanied by a couple of goblin runts, a big Golem and an Elf Fencer, you can. Races are split into traditionally ‘good’ or ‘bad’ factions (e.g. elves, dwarves and humans are good while goblins, orcs, ratman are bad) but it’s actually a good idea to mix the two together to unlock possible combined abilities.
In casual games you start by agreeing a set amount of gold with your opponent that can be used to hire gang members (in a casual game there’s no restriction on whom you can hire, unlike a campaign). Your first decision will be your gang leader. Depending upon your gang leader, it’s likely to shape the rest of your gang. For example Barry the Elf increases the healing abilities of your gang, while Dorick the Dwarf Loan Shark gives you extra gold, and Grobblar the Goblin Queen is good at using other goblins as a goblin shields to soak up damage. Along with these you can select the fearsome Kobold Egg Keeper, The Body Snatcher, Klacka the Orc Warboss and Screek the Ratman Sewer Master.

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Goblins and Dwarves standing together as firm friends (well, firm may be a stretch...)
After choosing your leader, it’s on to the Runts. These are the lowest of the low. Gathered from the back alleys and gutters of Ordinsport they’re shoved into scraps with a rusty weapon and not much else. Although not much use when fighting on their own. They are handy when trying to outnumber an opponent or grabbing any scenario objectives.
With the runts out the way it’s on to the Thugs. These range from Orc Ruffians to Ratman Slavers and Elf Archers. They’re a little bit more resilient than the runts and marginally better in combat. Things start to get even more interesting with the Big Guys. Here you’ve got the option of an Ogre, Troll, Rat Brute, Kobold Gator and Golem. As you might expect, these are the heavy hitters of your gang and all of them are fighting with at least four cards. If you team them up with a runt you can outnumber your foe and unlock that all-important fifth card.

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A ragtag band of miscreants - yet in Kobolds & Cobblestones they could be working together!
Finally you’ve got the Experts. As the name might imply, these are typically the most skilled in combat but you have to pay the most money to hire them for your gang. Experts range from a Dwarf Berserker (who can potentially trigger extra attacks), a Halfling Thief (who excels in stealing money and breaking into treasure chests), an Orc Bouncer (good at grabbing enemies or hitting any opponents that are pushed into him), etc. However, they’re likely to become the focus of your opponent’s attacks, so it’s good idea to keep them safe until they’re really needed.
With the ability to mix the races together, it means that gangs can vary quite a lot. Mainly because you can scrabble around in your bits drawer to find some suitable miniatures and then start scrapping. Plus, who hasn’t wanted to see goblins and dwarves fighting alongside each other?
Kobolds and Cobblestones is currently available for preorder and will be released on 25 January. Order your copy today!


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1. Sneak Peek at April Artwork - 2018-01-25 10:25:00
This April we're steering through World War II and into the so-called Toyota War with our new releases. Today on the blog, we're giving you your monthly sneak peek at what's to come, by showcasing some of the artwork in our upcoming books.
Brittany 1944 by Steven J. Zaloga
Illustrated by Darren Tan

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This plate is from Campaign 320: Brittany 1944, which tells the fascinating story of one of the key battles for German-occupied France. The scene featured here depicts the Battle for Hill 103, which lasted from 26 August–3 September 1944. The attack on 27 August was supported by M4 medium tanks, which can be seen in the background. Whilst this attack failed to secure the hill, a night attack would later help push the German paratroopers off the summit, and aid the later victory on 3 September.
Technicals by Leigh Neville
Illustrated by Peter Dennis

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This second plate is from New Vanguard 257: Technicals, which focuses on the armed pick-up trucks that have become the most ubiquitous military land vehicle of recent years. The top technical of a modified Toyota Hilux is based on sightings during 2015 and 2016 in Libya, manned by a Western SOF. The modifications here feature self-recovery winches, camouflage nets, and a custom WMIK-style ‘cage’ in the rear, which holds supplies. The second modified Toyota is based on those seen in Iraq and Syria, in which the cruiser has been fitted with a permanent satellite communications antennae and stowage racks.

Short Stirling Units of World War 2 by Jonathan Falconer
Illustrated by Chris Davey


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This final plate from Combat Aircraft 124: Short Stirling Units of World War 2. This aircraft, the Stirling IV EF446/8E-O of No 295 Sqn, had originally served with No 90 Sqn in 1943 as a Mk III before its conversion into a Mk IV, after which the Stirling passed briefly to No 570 Sqn (8Z-O, 19 July 1944) before joining No 295 Sqn (as 8E-O, on 3 August), where it bore the name Goofy II and associated artwork. It flew five successful missions during Operation Market Garden between 17 and 23 September 1944m and Varsity on 24 March 1945. The nose of the aircraft featured the Disney character Goofy, along with a nine-bomb log in yellow. EF446 was also struck off charge on 5 June 1947.
Click here to pre-order, and to see what else is being published this April. Remember to let us know which book you're looking forward to in the comments!


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1. Let's Play Gaslands - Gaming With the Cooler - 2018-01-29 09:39:54
Owen from Gaming with the Cooler and Ash from Guerilla Miniature Games go head-to-head in Mike Hutchinson's Gaslands, in what is undoubtedly one of the most chaotic Death Races we've seen so far! Check out the video below.


Order your copy of Gaslands: Post Apocalyptic Vehicular Combat today and bring the chaos to your tabletop!


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1. Five Historic Military Sieges - 2018-01-30 12:00:00
Saturday 27 January marked 74 years since the Siege of Leningrad, which has had us looking back at some of the most notable sieges in military history that have been covered by us here at Osprey.
To read more about these epic sieges that changed history, click the artwork featured.
Siege of Leningrad

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The Siege of Leningrad is one of the most famous sieges in military history, remembered for the sheer devastation that was inflicted upon civilians. Taking place between 8 September 1941 and 27 January 1944 on the Eastern Front of World War II, it saw the German Army Group North isolate and cripple the city and its garrison. During the two years, the city was pounded with artillery and air assaults, and despite the PVO air defence units preventing daytime attacks, September 1941 saw 475 night bombing sorties, which inflicted 4,400 casualties. The overall impact was deadly, with 1.5 million Soviets killed by combat, disease or starvation. However, breakthrough finally came in January 1944, when after 47 days of fighting, the Leningrad and Volkhov fronts advanced 300km and shattered the previously impregnable defences of Heeresgruppe Nord.
Siege of Jerusalem

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Following a local disturbance in 66 AD in Caesarea resulting in a pan-Jewish revolt against the Romans, Titus Flavius was sent with 70,000 men to besiege the city of Jerusalem. Titus’s attempt to negotiate with the defenders was short-lived, and the blockade of the city resulted in civilians eating whatever they could find, which included sewage and some even turning to cannibalism. The legions remorselessly trailed the streets, strangling the life out of the defense, razing buildings to the ground. The apotheosis of the conflict was the final stand of the last holdouts in the Temple precinct, and the utter annihilation of this, the physical manifestation of Judaism itself.
The Alamo

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Whilst the Siege of the Alamo is on quite a smaller scale than the others featured here, it remains one of the most famous sieges in US history. Taking place between 23 February–6 March 1836, the Alamo has become immortalised in several books, documentaries and films, with folk-hero and frontiersman Davy Crockett often taking centre stage. The siege began when Colonel William Travis and James Bowie decided to fortify the Alamo mission, but it came to a brutal end on 6 March when approximately 1,100 Mexican soldiers stormed the mission and slaughtered the garrison. ‘Remember the Alamo’ was the battle cry two months later at the decisive Battle of San Jacinto, which led Texas to independence.
Siege of Gibraltar

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After Spain declared war on Britain in June 1779, it didn’t take long for them to strike Britain’s key base for naval operations in the Mediterranean. Gibraltar, located in the south of the Iberian Peninsula, was the perfect target. A French and Spanish fleet proceeded to blockade Gibraltar, whilst an infantry force began fortifications on land. Sharpshooters, canon fire, and surprise attacks kept the besiegers at bay, whilst the ingenious ‘red-hot shot’ tactics of heated cannonballs to set whole ships on fire conquered the Spanish fleet. The siege finally came to an end three years and seven months later, making it one of the longest sieges endured by the British Armed Forces.
Siege of Vicksburg

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The 1863 Vicksburg campaign was a huge turning point of the American Civil War. Taking place between 18 May­­­­­­–4 July 1863, it was known as the ‘Gibraltar of the West’. In a masterly campaign, Union General Ulysses S. Grant used riverboats and steamers to land his army south of the city, he then trapped Confederate forces with the town of Vicksburg. Grant instructed his men to dig trenches to lay a 47-day siege against the city. Underground mines proved incredibly beneficial, and eventually the Confederates were forced to surrender.
How many of these have you read? What other sieges should we cover? Head to the ‘books you'd like to read’ box on our homepage to post your suggestions!


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1. February's Book Vote and January's Results - 2018-02-02 11:00:00
Our Weapon series is the focus of this month's book vote, including weapons from the 17th century right on through to the 20th. Have a read of the descriptions below and click the link to make your vote!
WPN: French Military Rifles 1936–90
WPN: The PIAT
WPN: Soviet Machine Guns of World War II
WPN: The Krag-Jørgensen Rifle WPN: The Bayonet

French Military Rifles 1936–90
The MAS-36 bolt-action rifle served alongside older Lebel and Berthier models in World War II before equipping French and other troops during conflicts in Indochina, Algeria and elsewhere. Fielded from 1949, the MAS-49 semi-automatic rifle and its derivatives saw combat across the world, often in harsh conditions, before being replaced by the FAMAS bullpup assault rifle.
The PIAT: Britain’s Anti-Tank Weapon 1942–50
Based on a mortar design and employing hollow-charge ammunition, the Projector, Infantry, Anti-Tank was intended to give British and Commonwealth infantrymen the ability to take on enemy tanks and fortifications. The PIAT saw widespread combat during World War II, from Sicily to Borneo, and would be used by six Victoria Cross recipients.
Soviet Machine Guns of World War II
In June 1941 the Soviet Union fielded a variety of machine guns, ranging from the distinctive DP ‘record player’ to the formidable 12.7mm DShK. During the conflict the SG-43 joined the ageing PM M1910 Maxim in the front line, and all four models would continue to equip Soviet and other forces for many years after 1945.
The Krag-Jørgensen Rifle
The Krag-Jørgensen, an innovative bolt-action weapon, entered US service in the 1890s and equipped US forces fighting in Cuba, the Philippines and elsewhere. It continued to be issued to the Norwegian armed forces into the 1940s, seeing service with German troops during World War II, and remains a popular weapon among civilian shooters today.
The Bayonet
From the 17th century onwards, gun designers have sought to convert military firearms into close-combat weapons by adding a blade at the muzzle. This study charts the evolution of the bayonet from its earliest beginnings to the latest developments, revealing the fascinating story of a family of weapons that have proved enduringly popular among collectors across the world.
Make your vote by clicking here!
Now it's time for last month's X-Planes book vote results, which saw Research Jets of World War II claim victory with 27% of the final vote. Avro CF-105 Arrow and Parasite Fighters 1910s-1950s weren't far behind with just 0.35% between them. See below the full results, and thank you to everyone who took the time to vote. XPL - Research Jets of World War II 27.47% XPL - Avro CF-105 Arrow 20.07% XPL - Parasite Fighters 1910s-1950s 20.42% XPL - Cold War Jet Seaplanes 15.84% XPL - Lockheed AH-56 Cheyenne 17.20%


2. Kobolds & Cobblestones - Money makes the (under)world go round! - 2018-02-02 08:59:26
Rob Burman is back on the blog to tell us more about Kobolds & Cobblestones, the latest addition to the Osprey Wargames series. This week he's looking at how you can use your hard-earned cash to turn a battle in your favour.
The dodgy underworld of Ordinsport is ruled by greed. Never a day goes by when at least a few palms aren’t greased to make sure the cogs of criminality run smoothly. Cash is an important commodity that can separate the low level thugs from the supreme crime lords. Knowing when to spend the odd coin to encourage the ‘troops’ or part with cash to bribe a rival can help gain the tactical advantage in a tight situation.

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With this in mind, I wanted to ensure that money played a key role in Kobolds & Cobblestones. Initially, cash is used to recruit your fighters. In a casual game you’ll need to decide whether you want to opt for cheap but weak runts or more expensive - but stronger - big guys and experts. Runts are good for capturing objectives but then big guys can bash them out the way!
However, money is also a commodity that can be spent during the game too. As a crime lord in training you are constantly pulling the strings behind the scenes. Although your chosen Gang Leader will be bashing heads together in the gloomy streets, your role as the mysterious boss (with potentially deep pockets) can help to turn the tide.
During a game you’ll have access to your stash of cash. In a casual game the stash will be any money left over after buying your gang members (up to a maximum of 10 coins). While playing you can spend the cash to gain temporary bonuses or encourage your gang members to fight with a bit more oomph. You can spend gold on the following: Counting Cards
You can remove cards from the discard pile and place them into your Combat Hand. This is handy if you’ve just used a playing card that could be used again to create an even better hand. Don’t Just Stand There!
Normally defending players will only be able to defend against an enemy attack. However, if you give them a little extra encouragement with the promise of a shiny gold coin, they’ll perform a counter attack (assuming they’re still standing, of course). Just Do It!
With the promise of some extra loot, even runts will get stuck in. You can spend coins to add extra cards to your Combat Hand. This is particularly handy for bluffing your opponent, as they may not be expecting a strong attack. ‘Ave a Swig of This
Occasionally your fighters will get injured. However, a quick swig of the latest brew from the Alchemist’s Labs will sort them right out - or their legs will drop off. Either way, it’s good fun to watch. Take it Like an Orc!
Tell your gang members to take it on the chin for once and reward their bravery (or stupidity). This reduces the amount of wounds taken and can be crucial for keeping those important fighters alive.
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Everyones for Sale!
“You live near me mum Scragga, why you bashing me over the head? Let’s be mates.”
One of the key elements of money is that you can also use it to bribe your opponent’s fighters. Allegiances in Ordinsports are fleeting. One minute an Orc Bouncer is fighting alongside Barry the Elf and the next he’s offered his services to Screek Sewer Master. Of course, along the way they might meet a few old friends who are willing to overlook the current situation… as long as you pay the right price.
The final element to spend your gold on is bribing your opponent’s gang members, which will potentially stop the active player from attacking. This is a great way of temporarily blocking those key attacks - but it comes at a price.
You can pay a Guaranteed Bribe, which is the normal cost of that gang member, e.g. a runt would be one coin, while a Dwarf Berserker costs six coins. This immediately ends the enemy model’s activation. Or you can Be a Cheapskate and pay just one coin. However, this doesn’t always work so you must draw a card from the Event Deck (a separate deck of cards kept to the side of the game) to see if the bribe is successful. If you draw a red card, it counts as a success but if you draw a black card, it’s unsuccessful and the enemy can finish their attack as normal.
If you like the idea of bribing rival gang members, you might want to consider taking Screek Sewer Master as your leader. This sneaky ratman excels in hunting around the gutters and sewers of Ordinspot to find information that people would prefer to be forgotten (the odd compromising painting, a misguided love letter, an unpaid bill to Dorick the Loan Shark, etc.). As a result when you’ve got Screek as your leader, all Guaranteed Bribes cost one less and when you fail a Be a Cheapskate check, you can draw another card from the Event Deck to see if that’s successful.
Well, hope you enjoyed that brief look at how money works in Kobolds & Cobblestones. In next week’s blog, we’ll be looking at wizards and their amazing (but potentially catastrophic) spells.
Think you've got what it takes to become a Kingpin of Ordinsport's seedy underbelly? Order your copy today!
Want to know more about the game? Check out Rob's other blogs on the Card-Based Mechanics and Creating Your Gang.


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1. 100 Years of the RAF - 2018-02-06 16:24:00
Ahead of the Royal Air Force's 100th anniversary in April, we're publishing former RAF pilot Michael Napier's book The Royal Air Force: A Centenary of Operations. From its formation as an independent service in the dying days of World War I, its desperate fight against the Axis air forces in World War II, to its commitments during both the Cold War and modern times, The Royal Air Force explores the true exploits and accomplishments of RAF personnel.
Today on the blog we welcome author Michael Napier as he discusses how he brings his own experience as a front-line RAF pilot to the writing of his new book.
The Royal Air Force, the oldest independent air force in the world, celebrates its centenary in 2018. The occasion presents a wonderful opportunity to produce a book recording the rich history of the service, but of course that history has been told many times before in a number of books over the years. So, my question to myself was ‘what can I bring to the story that makes a difference?’ The answer was that my own experience as a front-line RAF pilot has given me an instinctive understanding of flying on the operational frontline. That experience and understanding gives me a slightly ‘different’ perspective on that history from that of a non-aviator or a professional historian. It is a perspective that sees the "core business" of the RAF to be the application of air power by the operational units and it leads me to write about the exploits of the service at the level of the front-line squadron. Of course, at first glance this approach seems to exclude the huge supporting infrastructure of the flying service, but in my view the ultimate success or otherwise of commanders, administrators, engineers and trainers is reflected in the results delivered at the front line. Thus, a successful air campaign reflects not just on the squadron aircrew who flew the missions, but on the performance of the service as a whole. So, I have written a book which is not a full history of the RAF as an organization, but is a comprehensive record of the application of air power by the front-line units of the RAF over the last one hundred years.

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A BAe Harrier GR3 lands on the flight deck of HMS Hermes after an operational sortie over the Falkland Islands
Other works on RAF history tend to tell the story sequentially in geographically based ‘chunks’: for example, an account of the Second World War might describe the whole of the war in Europe, then deal with the Atlantic, then the Middle East and finally the Far East. Unfortunately, this approach tends to be ‘Eurocentric’ and operations in distant theatres of war tend therefore to be seen as being less important or less relevant than those close to home. I decided that a better approach would be to deal with all operational theatres on the same timeline so that, for example, one can see that the East African campaign of 1940–1941 overlapped with the Battle of Britain and the ‘Blitz,’ or that preparation for the D-Day landings took place at the same time as the battles at Imphal and Kohima in the Far East. Describing contemporaneous events side by side on the same timeline helps the reader to understand how events affected each other and how the needs of forces in one theatre might have had to be met at the expense of forces in another. This theme is as relevant today as it was in 1944, and in more recent times it has been illustrated by the overstretch generated by the simultaneous campaigns at the start of this century in Iraq and Afghanistan.
While on the subject of chronology, I believe that an operational history of the RAF should start in 1918 (the histories of its forerunners, the Royal Naval Air Service (RNAS) and the Royal Flying Corps (RFC), have already been covered in depth numerous times) and continue right up until 2018, in other words that it should come completely to date in terms of detail and depth of coverage. Furthermore, each year should also be treated, as far as possible with equal weighting, so that operations since 1945 are not completely overshadowed by the events that occurred nearly seventy-five years ago during the Second World War. The Second Word War does fill two chapters of the book, but six more chapters describe operations through the post-war years to the present day. I have also tried to steer clear of the cult of personalities, my only exception being a photograph of Eric Lock, the highest scoring RAF pilot of the Battle of Britain and an inspiration to me as a schoolboy.
Finally, I also wanted to break away from the clichéd – and not entirely correct – "popular history" route of Trenchard, Sopwith Camels, Schneider Trophy, Supermarine Spitfires, Avro Lancasters, Avro Vulcans, Hawker Harriers and the Red Arrows. Certainly, all of those mentioned played their part in the past one hundred years, but the operational history of air power in that timescale is a much more complex subject. It is true that Trenchard played a major role in the formation of the RAF and, indeed, he was the first Chief of the Air Staff (CAS), but he was but one of a number of "makers and shakers" and his first stint at CAS lasted only a few weeks. I identify the two key players as Jan Smuts, whose report recommended the amalgamation of the RNAS and the RFC into a single independent service, and Frederick Sykes, who succeeded Trenchard as CAS in 1918 and who steered the service through its first year of existence. In my view either Smuts or Sykes should rightly be known as the ‘Father of the RAF.’ But history is written by the winners and when Trenchard was reappointed as CAS in 1919 he ensured that his rival Sykes’ good work was excised from the public memory. That is not to disrespect Trenchard whose tenure as CAS over the next ten years undoubtedly ensured the survival of the RAF as an independent service, but in that context, I see him more as a ‘nursemaid’ than a ‘parent’ of the new service.

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RAF A400M Atlas transport aircraft carrying out a series of spectacular test landings and take offs on a beach in South Wales
Credit: MOD/Crown copyright 2017
It is also true that the Sopwith Camel was one of the outstanding aircraft of the First World War, but it was actually the decidedly unglamorous Royal Aircraft Factory RE8, a plodding workhorse of an aeroplane, that formed the backbone of the ‘Corps’ squadrons whose work was so vital to the success of the land operations in all of the theatres of war through 1918. And while the Schneider Trophy races of the late 1920s and early 1930s undoubtedly stirred the public imagination, the reality for the front-line squadrons patrolling the remote and frequently hostile parts of the Empire was not of streamlined seaplanes flying at 400 mph, but of flimsy biplanes such as the de Havilland DH9A, which were barely capable of a quarter of that speed. Far, far away from the public eye the front-line squadrons of the RAF were responsible for ensuring the security of the peoples of Egypt, Palestine, Iraq and India – and they were often forgotten by a public that was more focussed on events within their immediate surroundings.
However, of all the items in the "popular history" of the RAF, it is the Supermarine Spitfire which fully deserves its place. It was arguably the only truly modern aeroplane in the RAF inventory on the outbreak of the Second World War and it was one of the only type (other than perhaps the Vickers Wellington) that remained in large-scale production and front-line service throughout the conflict. Spitfires fought in all of the major theatres of war from the Battle of Britain to the Burma campaign and in every case, they tipped the balance of air superiority in favour of the RAF. The Spitfire rightly deserves its reputation as a superb machine and one of the most effective aircraft ever to have been operated by the RAF. The Avro Lancaster, too, still enjoys tremendous popularity, but if I were to choose the most outstanding four-engined aeroplane of the Second World War, I would go for the Consolidated B-24 Liberator. The Liberator swung the balance of the Battle of the Atlantic and without the vital part played by Coastal Command in that campaign, there could have been no D-Day; the Liberator also saw important RAF service in the Mediterranean, Central Europe and the Balkans as well as playing a crucial role in Burma.

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And it is right that the public should still hold the Avro Vulcan in such esteem: armed with the Blue Steel stand-off missile, the delta-winged bomber took its place on the frontline as part of the UK’s nuclear deterrent and in later years it also played an important part in the liberation of the Falkland Islands. But the Handley-Page Victor also served as a nuclear bomber with Blue Steel missiles and it was the Victor in its role as an air-to-air refuelling (AAR) tanker that enabled the Vulcan to reach the Falklands in 1982. Indeed, the Victor proved to be the longest serving of the V-bombers and one can argue that in its AAR role it contributed far more to the effectiveness of the RAF in campaigns from the Falklands to the Persian Gulf, as well as supporting the air defences of the UK, than did the Vulcan during its service. So, should we not remember the Victor as being the ‘iconic V-Bomber’?
The Royal Air Force: a Centenary of Operationsis, then, a ‘history with a difference’ – and one which I hope gives a new perspective on the exploits of the RAF over the last century.
The Royal Air Force by Michael Napier is available for pre-order and is available for a discounted price of £28.50 throughout February. Pre-order your copy by clicking here.


2. February Sale - Highlights from Osprey Games - 2018-02-06 11:14:42
We've got a huge sale running throughout February, with up to 70% off our entire range. Here are a few of the highlights that you may want to add to your collection. Let Them Eat Cake - 70% OFF

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From Peer Sylvester comes a game of committees, coercion and cake. Elect your friends to positions of power in the hope that they look on your patronage favourably, or denounce them as enemies of the revolution. Alliances and betrayal are all fair game as you try to amass as much cake as you can before the revolution collapses.
Here's a review from The Dice Tower to give you more information on how the game works.
Order your copy today. Frostgrave: Into the Breeding Pits

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With this supplement for Frostgrave, players can lead their warbands into the vast network of catacombs, sewers, and dungeons that run underneath the Frozen City. It was in these dark confines that the ancient wizards known as Beastcrafters experimented on living creatures, creating strange hybrids and deadly monsters, many of which still roam the forgotten passageways. Along with a host of new scenarios, treasures, soldiers, and creatures, the book also contains rules for the traps and secret passages that are often found in the dungeons. With wonderful and rare magical treasures to be discovered, will players risk taking their warbands down into the Breeding Pits?
What does this add to Frostgrave? Check out this playthrough video from Guerilla Miniatures Games and Gaming with the Cooler.
Order your copy today. They Come Unseen - 50% OFF

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Designed by retired Royal Navy Officer and submarine commander Andy Benford, and developed deep beneath the waves, They Come Unseen is an asymmetrical strategy game of bluff and deception that uses two boards, one for action on the surface, seen by both sides, and one for movement underwater, seen only by the submarine commanders. The game also comes with specially designed control panels to help keep track of vital information such as fuel, ammunition and current cruising depth.
Order your copy today. Escape from Colditz - 30% OFF

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Designed by Major Pat Reid, one of only a handful of prisoners-of-war to escape Colditz Castle, and screenwriter Brian Degas, Escape From Colditz is the iconic game of careful planning and nerves of steel.

Become Allied escape officers - assemble your equipment, plot your escape routes, and coordinate your efforts to avoid the guards. Become the German security officer - maintain control through guile, ruthlessness, and careful observation despite limited numbers.

This deluxe edition of the classic game for 2 to 6 players includes both original and updated rules, new hand-painted artwork, an oversized board, 56 wooden playing pieces, 100 fully illustrated cards, a 32-page history book, and unique replicas of artefacts from the prison.
Not familiar with this classic game? Take a look at this review from ManVsMeeple.
Order your copy today. Mad Dogs With Guns - 30% OFF

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In Mad Dogs With Guns, players form their own small gangs of fedora-wearing, tommy gun-wielding gangsters and battle it out with their rivals. With numerous different gangs to choose from, including cops and G-men, a fully integrated campaign system, and rules for special situations such as car chases, the game offers a huge variety of tactical challenges. Bribe public officials, attend a gangland funeral, but always watch your back - there is always another gang waiting to poach your territory…
This flipthrough from Wargames Illustrated gives you a look inside the book.
Order your copy today. Escape from the Aliens in Outer Space - 30% OFF

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A mysterious alien plague has crept aboard the spacestation and is transforming the human crew into horrendous monsters! The remaining crewmen desperately try to save their lives by escaping from the derelict spaceship, but in the darkness the aliens are lurking…

HUNGRY FOR HUMAN FLESH!

This a game of strategy and bluff set on a badly damaged deep space research station. Each player's identity and position is kept secret: you will need to interpret the movements and behaviours of the other players to learn where, and what, they really are.
Want to know more about this game? Take a look at this review from The Dice Tower.
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