Новини - литература и периодика - Архив 2017г.

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1. Dracula's America - Introducing the Factions - 2017-07-27 07:15:00
A few folks have been asking for more details about the Factions in Dracula's America: Shadows of the West - so here goes!
First off, it's important to note that as Posse construction is pretty flexible in terms of the Skills, weapons and gear you can give to your models, it's actually possible to choose any Faction you like and have them play to your favoured tactics- for example, a Red Hand Coven Posse could be tooled-up for close-quarter firefights with a mix of dual-wielding pistols, shotguns and sawn-offs; or play the ranged game equally well, with lots of carbines, rifles and buffalo guns!
Having said that, the Supernatural models unique to each Faction can help you reinforce the strengths or mitigate the weaknesses of your Posse...

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The Twilight Order
A secret society of monster-hunters whose origins date back to the Crusades, the Order has followed its nemesis – Dracula – to the New World. Since arriving, they have had to adapt their hunting methods to the lawless frontier (though not without considerable friction between the staunch European traditionalists and their headstrong new American recruits) – it is not unusual to see pistol-wielding Crusaders wearing sturdy breastplates beneath their dusters alongside a grim-faced Templar in full plate armour and wielding a blessed greatsword.
In the game, this Faction gets two fearless Crusaders kitted out with armour and with silver bullets loaded in all of their guns. Although slow when on foot, they are incredibly resilient to enemy fire and excel at facing down all kinds of horrific beasts and calmly despatching them in short order. As if that wasn’t enough, an Arcanist of the Order can summon a Seraphim – awe-inspiring winged entities that wield twin blessed silver pistols. All in all, the Twilight Order does what it does very well – kill monsters!
To see the miniatures available for the Twilight Order, head over to the Northstar Military Figures website.
The Red Hand Coven
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Dracula’s vampiric minions can come from any walk of life, and their Posses feature townsfolk, desperate outlaws, conscripted Union soldiers, and even rich and well-to-do folks from back East. The most important vampire leaders (called Broodsires) are often protected during daylight hours by a member of Dracula’s own elite Carpathian Guard, who still wield their fearsome two-handed woodsmen’s axes.
A Red Hand Posse gets two vampiric Broodkin that are very fast and hard to put down. They can also mess with your opponent’s game plan by using their innate Transfix power. If wounded, they can feed on helpless enemies or innocent bystanders to heal themselves! The covens of the Red Hand therefore fulfil many roles – from stealthy infiltrators to ruthless enforcers of Dracula’s will...
To see the miniatures available for the Red Hand Coven, head over to the Northstar Military Figures website.

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The Skinwalker Tribes
A loose confederation of Native American tribes, the Skinwalkers are guided by the hand of the mysterious Shaman known only as White Raven. They are united by a common goal – to restore the balance of Nature that has been upset by both Dracula’s evil and the unthinking greed of the settlers encroaching upon their lands. They are aided in this by the re-awakening of ancient abilities to transform into powerful beast forms!
In the game, Skinwalker Tribe Posses are granted two Skinwalkers, and each must choose a beast form – either wolf or bear. The wolf is fast and savage on the attack, while the bear is slower but capable of inflicting massive damage with its huge claws and a brutal bear-hug. Whichever you choose, both forms excel in close combat. A Skinwalker Arcanist can summon a Wendigo to fight for them – this feral, cannibalistic spirit is a pretty mean fighter, but it gets even meaner when attacking a wounded enemy, as the scent of fresh blood drives it berserk.
To see the miniatures available for the Skinwalker Tribes, head over to the Northstar Military Figures website.
The Crossroads Cult
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The Crossroads Cult is a Faction of two extremes. At the top of its convoluted hierarchy are wealthy tycoons and bored aristocrats, led by the enigmatic and disgustingly wealthy Edward Crowley – businessman, rail-baron... and secret practitioner of dark sorcery. At the bottom of the heap are the ignorant and/or desperate common folk, treated as hired muscle at best or expendable pawns at worst! Unknown even to Dracula, Crowley serves diabolical masters and is using his position as head of the Transcontinental Railway to enact his Great Ritual…
A Crossroads Cult Posse is led by a Magister with the ability to summon a variety of terrifying Abyssal entities during play, allowing for unexpected reinforcements where needed, or providing expendable minions to further your plans. They also get a Harbinger, an Abyssal/human hybrid, who is the real power behind the throne. The Harbinger brings yet more summoning potential to the Posse, and boosts the Magister’s arcane abilities while he close enough to whisper infernal advice to his ‘master’.
To see the miniatures available for the Crossroads Cult, head over to the Northstar Military Figures website.

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The Congregation
Born out of the ‘cold war’ that existed while the armies of North and South rearmed and regrouped following the bloody stalemate at Gettysburg, the Congregation is an eclectic mix of ex-slaves, fanatical abolitionists, and other desperate folk fighting to survive in the swamps of the South. Led by a council of houngans and mambos, The Congregation uses Vodouto call upon the aid of powerful spirits known as loa to fight a guerrilla war against the growing power of their greatest foes – the necromancers of the Dark Confederacy.
In the game, The Congregation has access to tough and relentless zombi warriors who willingly choose undeath in order to continue the fight. These give the Faction excellent staying power in a campaign, as you can simply choose to have a valuable model come back from the dead (albeit at the cost of being able to improve further). Congregation Posses can also field a Vessel – a chosen fighter that is possessed by a loa spirit before each game, granting them the power of flight and the ability to unleash blasts of arcane power upon their foes. Arcanists of this Faction can also summon a couple of unique creatures – the tough-as-nails mass of lumbering vegetation known as a Swamp Baka, and the skull-headed, fire-breathing Temple Snake.
To see the miniatures available for the Congregation, head over to the Northstar Military Figures website.
The Dark Confederacy
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When the South finally surrendered, many hard-bitten Rebs, led by the charismatic (and completely unhinged!) Jebediah Crane, refused to give in and took to the hills and swamps to wage a guerrilla war against the hated Yankees. These bitter and desperate men tore the secrets of Vodou from a captured Bokor of the Congregation and twisted them to suit their own aims, raising Revenants from their graves. With this new-found necromantic power, the mad General vowed that the South would – quite literally – rise again!
A Dark Confederacy Posse is always led by a Master Necromancer, one of General Craine’s inner circle. This model is the focal point of your Posse, and has access to various arcane powers as well as the ability to raise a number of Revenants before each game. The Revenants themselves allow the Dark Confederacy to outnumber most opponents and, being undead, are terrifying to face and hard to kill, but slow and mindless. The Necromancer must control them from a distance – they never activate by themselves, instead acting when the Necromancer does. This allows for some unique tactics for multiple activations that no other Posse can match. If the Necromancer falls, however, the Revenants collapse and become harmless corpses once more. The Necromancer may also summon a Vengeful Shade – a ghostly Confederate that excels as an assassin, passing through solid obstacles in the hunt for mortal targets.
To see the miniatures available for the Dark Confederacy, head over to the Northstar Military Figures website.

Dracula's America: Shadows of the West is an upcoming skirmish game of gothic horror set in an alternate Old West. It is due to publish in August.

Artwork by RU_MOR.
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1. Exploring The Battle of Cynoscephalae with Myke Cole (#4) - 2017-07-28 18:45:02
oday, we ventured south and west into the ridges and hills surrounding the Karadag range in Thessaly where the famous Battle of Cynoscephalae was fought in 197 B.C. I’m writing this from the balcony of the Hotel Titagion in the mountains of Agrafa. We’re overlooking Lake Plasitras, which is like something out of a fantasy novel, right down to the sheer-faced mountains rising straight from the shore and the butter-colored sun seeming to sink below the surface of the water.
We got to spend the day seeing the ancient city of Dion, where Alexander the Great sacrificed before launching on his expedition into Asia, and we also toured the battlefield of Cynoscephalae, which is one of the battles covered in Legion vs. Phalanx. We confirmed a lot of our suppositions about the battle, and I feel even more confident about the positions I take in the book, and I am hoping to raise new questions in the book that haven’t been addressed before.

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We received a warm welcome from the Mayor of Fasala, the closest city to the battlefield. Vasso Noula, the Special Archaeological Consultant to the Mayor, joined us for our battlefield walk and provided us with both local knowledge and expert consultation.
Folks, the bottom line is that Greece is magic, and anyone who tells you that researching ancient warfare is lame is out of their mind. We’re not here on vacation. We’re working our tails off, and this is still one of the most incredible trips of our lives.
But enough waxing eloquent on Greece. Let me bring you up to speed on the Battle of Cynoscephalae.

BACKGROUND
The Battle of Cynoscephalae, fought in 197 B.C., ended the second of Rome’s four Macedonian Wars, securing a place in history for the Roman consul Titus Quinctius Flamininus, checking the power of the Antigonid King Philip V, and imposing a brutal peace that laid the groundwork for the Third Macedonian War against Philip’s son Perseus. The Antigonids were one of the great “Successor” (diadochi) dynasties descended from Alexander the Great’s generals, who squabbled over his empire after his death in 323 B.C. Philip V was the Great-Great-Great-Grandson of Alexander’s famous general Antigonus I Monopthalmus (Antigonus the One-Eyed), the founder of the Antigonid dynasty. The Antigonids are frequently referred to as “Macedonians” and sometimes just as “Greeks.” Those descriptors are accurate.
The Battle of Cynoscephalae was an accidental engagement, with neither general ready for, nor desiring a pitched battle, fought over terrain that suited neither side. It was a close-run, see-sawing fight, a study in the kind of chaos that truly tests the ingenuity of individual commanders and soldiers. It was also a contest primarily between two iconic, culturally-representative and distinct formations: the Antigonid phalanx with their twenty-one foot pikes (sarissa), and the Roman legion with their short swords (gladius hispaniensis) and javelins (pilum).

THE SOURCES
Our literary sources for Cynoscephalae are comparatively good when you consider the general state of ancient material. This is, sadly, not saying much. We have Plutarch’s Life of Flamininus in his Parallel Lives, which gives a moralistic retelling from Rome’s point-of-view, 3 chapters from Livy, with all the attendant concerns about his mistranslations and prioritization of drama over accuracy, and 9 chapters from Polybius, who was a client of the powerful Aemili family, and thus positively disposed toward Rome. Many historians ignore the writings of the 12th C. Byzantine writer Joannes Zonaras, arguing that he writes too far from the event to be considered a primary source. But he must be considered, as it is likely he is filling in gaps left by lacunae in Cassius Dio’s Roman History. The battle is mentioned in Quintus Ennius' Annales. Pausanias' Description of Greece discusses the war at length and the battle more briefly. Justinus discusses the battle in his Epitome of the Philippic Histories, and mention is also made in the Chronicle of Eusebius and in Orosius' History Against the Pagans.
A lot of good scholarship on Cynoscephalae has been published, perhaps the most famous being a series of pieces by J. Kromayer in 1907, W.K. Pritchett in 1969, and N.G.L. Hammond in 1988. These articles provide a great foundation from which to reckon what we already know about the battle, and to use as a jumping off point for a re-examination.

THE SECOND MACEDONIAN WAR
Rome's First Macedonian War, also fought against Philip V, broke out largely due to Philip’s mistaken belief that the Carthaginian general Hannibal Barca, having just crushed the Romans at Cannae in 216 B.C., would win the Second Punic War. Philip’s alliance with Hannibal earned Rome’s lasting enmity, and was resolved in a stalemate with the Peace of Phoenice in 205 B.C. A year after the Peace of Phoenice, the Successor King Ptolemy IV Philopator (father-loving) died, leaving his six year old son Ptolemy V to succeed him. Philip seized the opportunity to strike a secret pact with the Seleucid (another Successor dynasty) King Antiochus III to seize the territory of the child King Ptolemy. The next few years were one of constant tension between the Antigonids and Rome, as Philip continued to try to expand his reach in Greece and Asia Minor, bringing him into running conflicts with the powerful states of Pergamum and Rhodes. Philip also pursued a war with Athens—at that point a Roman ally. Rome finally demanded that Philip cease his attempts to annex the holdings of Ptolemy, leave Athens alone, and settle things with Pergamum and Rhodes. Philip pled his case to Rome, passionately asserting that his actions were not in violation of the Peace of Phoenice, but the arguments fell on deaf ears, and Rome soon had armies on the move in Illyria to protect their allies and bring Philip to heel.

THE CAMPAIGN
The consul Publius Sulpicius Galba had fought without distinction in the First Macedonian War, and continued his lackluster performance in the second. In 198 B.C. Galba was replaced by Publius Villius Tappulus, who managed to do even worse, with 2,000 veterans of the Second Punic War under his command mutinying. Rome's crisis of command had the Second Macedonian War off to a bad start, and there was every indicator that it would mimic the First in an end not particularly favorable to Rome. But in 198 B.C. command was taken up by Titus Quinctius Flamininus, a commander of real energy, if not genius, who drastically altered the course of events.

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Flamininus immediately set out for Epirus, taking 3,000 veterans from the Second Punic War, and ignoring the administrative and ceremonial duties of a Roman consul. Consuls served for a year, and it's likely that Flamininus was aware of this ticking clock and acting to prosecute the war before it ran out. Flamininus quickly defeated Philip at the Aous River Gorge, by means of a flanking maneuver. In addition to a moral victory for Rome, Flamininus killed 2,000 Antigonid troops and captured Philip's baggage. More importantly, Flamininus announced that his mission was no longer just to check Philip, but proclaimed the "Freedom of the Greeks," an effort to liberate all of Greece from foreign occupation (a promise that rang hollow when Rome occupied Greece following Cynoscephalae). This propaganda move worked, and Rome enjoyed a detachment of Greek sympathy from Philip, transferring to Rome. The countryside shifted gradually, more hostile to the Antigonids, more friendly to Rome.
The two armies skirmished and maneuvered in Thessaly, with Philip finally marching west in the direction of Scotussa, a fertile region, where Philip hoped to supply his army. Even better, Scotussa was near the road to Palaepharsalus, which meant Philip's army could be in contact with his line of supply to the north, and also perhaps to troops he had garrisoned to the south in Pharsalus. Flamininus shadowed the Antigonid king, hoping to force a decisive battle when the ground was suitable.
But the ground was not suitable.
As the two armies forged west of Scotussa, they found themselves in a series of broken ridges that blocked line-of-sight, made for a tough march, and perhaps most importantly, were the exact wrong ground to deploy the Antigonid pike-armed phalanx, which required as flat and unbroken ground as possible. With the Karadag range between them, the two armies marched on only generally aware of the other's position, utterly ignorant of the fact that they were just 12KM apart.
Between them lay a ridge of low hills named "Dog-Heads," in Greek—Cynoscephalae.
That night, a soaking rain fell, resulting in a thick mist the following morning. Marching blind, Philip sent light troops out to reconnoiter from high ground, at precisely the same time Flamininus sent out "ten squadrons of horse and about a thousand light-armed infantry" (Polybius) with the same purpose. The two covering forces bumped into one another, and a skirmish erupted.
Neither side expected a general engagement, much less one that would end the Second Macedonian War, but we don't always get what we expect.

ORDER OF BATTLE (OOB)
The sources are very clear and almost entirely in lockstep on the composition of the Antigonid army. Philip had 16,000 phalangites—heavy infantry in full panoply, armed with the long pike, 2,000 "peltasts" (an elite corps of probably phalangites, named for the pelte shield they carried), 2,000 Thracians (armed either skirmishers or light "shock" close-combat troops), 2,000 Tralles (Illyrians, most likely armed as skirmishers), 1,500 mercenaries of various nationalities and 2,000 cavalry, for a total strength of 25,500 men.
We are on less firm ground for Flamininus, but we do know that the Roman consular army of this period usually consisted of 2 legions, with an equal number of socii (Italian allied troops, usually armed and organized along legionary lines). At full strength, Flamininus' legions numbered approximately 5,000 men. We're guided by Polybius' original account of a legion around 4,200 infantry, but also by Livy's account of 2,000 hastati (the front line shock troops of the Roman legion) with Flamininus at Thebes, indicating a larger (possibly by 40%) legion, as Polybius' description has 1,200 hastati. We also know that Rome's Aetolian Greek allies sent them 400 cavalry and 6,000 infantry, while the Athamanian Greeks sent 1,200 infantry. An additional 800 infantry joined the Romans from Crete. The Greek allied infantry may have been armed as thureophoroi (light, missile-capable, shock-troops equipped with the thureos shield) or as skirmishers. The Cretan troops were almost certainly archers. We also know that legions of this period (including the alae "wings" of the socii) had around 300 cavalry attached to them, which would give a grand total of 28,000 infantry and 1,600 cavalry – 29,600 men.
These numbers match Livy's statement that the armies were about equal, but conflicts with his statement that the Romans were stronger in cavalry. It matches Plutarch's assessment that Flamininus had over 26,000 soldiers, and that the opposing forces were roughly the same size. The Romans also fielded twenty war elephants, with their attendant crews.
We know little of how the OOB played out on the ground, but can extrapolate from general knowledge of Roman and Antigonid deployments from this period. The Antigonids would ideally deploy their phalanx in four strategia (brigades) in a line, with the most veteran units to the right (likely the peltasts). Phalangites would deploy sixteen men deep. The cavalry would be deployed on the flanks and the skirmishers out front in a screen. The Romans would have deployed their troops in a triplex acies of three lines—the hastati (green/young men), the principes (more veteran troops), and finally the triarii (hardened veterans). The first two lines would have been armed with 2 javelins each and the short sword. The last line would be armed with a thrusting spear. The three lines would be deployed in ten staggered maniples (handfuls), with a maniple-wide gap between each one. The three lines would deploy in a checkboard (quincunx) pattern, with the each line covering the intervals of the line in front. The Roman skirmishers (velites) would have deployed in a screen out front, and the cavalry on the flanks.
Command and Control (C2) would have been largely centralized in the monarchical Antigonid phalanx, resulting in a rigid force designed to deploy once and hold position thereafter. Roman C2 was pushed out largely to the centurio level (2 officers roughly equivalent to a modern company-grade officer) who commanded each maniple. This allowed greater tactical flexibility to the Romans.

EQUIPMENT
The Antigonid phalangites likely wore a complete panoply of approximately forty pounds, including bronze helmet and greaves and a linothorax (linen cuirass) and bore the pelte, a shield approximately two feet in diameter and slightly concave, without an offset rim. The pelte was slung on the arm using a loop called the porpax, and may have included an antilabe, a handle that could be used to grip with the hand to maneuver the shield if the phalangite transitioned to their sword (a backup weapon). Normally, the left hand projected past the shield rim, allowing the phalangite to wield the pike with both hands. A strap around the shoulders, the ochane, helped support the shield's weight. Officers or wealthier soldiers may have worn a bronze muscle-cuirass in place of the linothorax.
The Roman legionaries also wore a complete panoply. For the hastati and principes, most likely a bronze pectoral that covered the heart. Some may have worn the lorica hamata, a mail cuirass, heavier and more expensive. The Triarii may have all worn mail. All three classes of troops would have worn helmets and at least one greave on the leading leg, though it's possible they may have worn two. All legionaries would have carried the scutum, an oval shield with a central boss that protected the hand while it gripped a single handle, which also doubled in allowing the shield to be used as a punching weapon. The shield was heavy, around twenty pounds, and roughly two and a half feet wide by four feet long.

POSITION AND BATTLEFIELD EVOLUTION

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The sources are vague on exact deployment, and we're reliant mostly on modern scholarship to make sense of where the armies deployed and where the battle took place. We know that the Roman camp was located down a slope from the Antigonid position, and the general impression (probably incorrectly) given by the sources is that the Cynoscephalae ridge ran in a single, unbroken line east-west between the two armies. The initial meeting of the covering forces supposedly took place on top of this ridge, with both forces sending panicked messengers back to their commanders pleading for aid. The sources give the following evolution of the battle, in this order:
1.) Flamininus responds to his covering force's plea for reinforcements, sending 500 cavalry and 2,000 infantry to assist. The exact composition of this force isn't clear, but Polybius indicates that at least some of the troops were Aetolian.
2.) Reinforced, the Romans drive the Antigonids up the hill, until they're forced to the crest.
3.) Philip responded by dispatching his Thessalian and Macedonian cavalry, as well as all his mercenaries (except the Thracians) to reinforce his own troops. This extra help turned the tide and forced the Romans back down the hill, nearly to their camp. The situation finally stabilized due to the efforts of the Aetolian cavalry, with the Romans pressed, but holding.
4.) Flamininus, seeing that the forcing back of his force was adversely impacting the morale of his entire force, sounded the general engagement. He stationed the right of his army behind the war elephants and held them in position, and sent the left half of his army to the aid of his beleaguered covering force.
4.) Philip, encouraged by reports that the Romans were on the run, committed what he had of his phalanx—approximately 50% or 8,000 phalangites (including the peltasts)—as the other half under his officer Nicanor were out foraging. Before advancing, he left orders for Nicanor to join him as soon as possible. This done, Philip marched half his army over the ridge to deliver what he believed to be a finishing blow. NOTE: As Polybius tells us that Nicanor had the greater part of the force, it is possible that Philip's right was less than 8,000 men/50% of the phalanx. It may have been a single brigade of approximately 4,096 men, or some other partial unit.
5.) As Philip arrived on the ridge summit, he saw his covering force, driven to retreat by the Roman covering force, now reinforced by the main Roman left. At this point, Philip realized he had no choice. Like it or not, he was committed to a general engagement.
6.) Philip received his retreating force, and integrated them on the right of his newly arrived troops, and deployed them double-depth (32 ranks deep). He then ordered his force to lower their pikes and charge. NOTE: Livy says they dropped their pikes and charged with swords, and is widely believed to have mistranslated Polybius.
7.) The superior impact/solidity of the double-depth phalanx, and momentum imparted by the downhill charge gave Philip the advantage, and he drove the Romans back down the ridge toward their camp.
8.) At this point Nicanor, hurrying with the rest of the phalanx, crested the ridge and saw what was happening and hurried to help. His phalanx was not deployed in line, and were in a column to march, likely for speed of movement.
9.) Flamininus, judging that his left wasn't going to be able to win the battle, transfers himself to his right. Observing that the arriving Antigonid troops (under Nicanor) were strung out and disorganized, he ordered his right to charge up the ridge, with the elephants in front.
10.) The Antigonid left, not properly formed up, or deployed into phalanx didn't even bother to try to fight. They fled at first contact with the elephants.
11.) The Roman right pursued the fleeing Antigonid left. One unnamed tribune (A Roman rank approximating a modern field-grade officer) wheeled off less than twenty maniples (Polybius) and attacked the Antigonid right in the rear. It is possible that the twenty maniples Polybius is referring to here are those of the Triarii from the legion and its associated ala, as these would amount to twenty maniples, would be the in the rear of the Roman right, and would be the most veteran and disciplined troops—more likely to break off a pursuit to get back in the fight.
12.) Attacked from both front and rear, the Antigonid right broke, and a general rout ensued.
13.) Philip retreated to a safe distance to observe the rout. Once he was sure the battle was lost, he escaped.

CASUALITES
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Livy and Polybius agree that 8,000 Antigonids were killed and 5,000 captured. Livy definitively states the number of captives at 5,000, while Polybius says it was not less than 5,000. Livy and Polybius also agree that the Romans took about 700 casualties, almost certainly entirely on the Roman left, from the Roman covering force and the main body that reinforced them. Livy goes on to debunk the claims of the Roman annalist Valerius Antias, who he says grossly exaggerates the casualties (Livy doesn't tell us if Antias is writing of the Antigonid casualties, Roman casualties, or both) as 40,000 dead and 5,700 taken prisoner. We can agree with Livy's assessment that Antias exaggerates, as, even if those were combined casualties, it would mean the utter annihilation of both armies. Livy goes on to criticize the Roman annalist Quintus Claudius Quadrigarius, who also exaggerates the casualties at 32,000 killed and 4,300 captured. Unfortunately, Neither Antias nor Claudius' original annals survive in anything or than fragmentary-referential form.



AFTERMATH
Philip fled to Tempe, where he recovered as many survivors as he could. The Romans went on to loot the Antigonid camp, only to find that the Aetolians had beat them to it, in a possible foreshadowing of hostilities to come between Rome and the Aetolian league. Initially, over the objections of the Aetolians, who wanted harsher terms, Philip surrendered his younger son Demetrius as a hostage, along with other friends, and paid an indemnity of two hundred talents. This bought him four months during which the rest of the treaty was negotiated. The Aetolians were waved off, and Philip was required to relinquish his conquests in the Balkans, Greece and Asia Minor. He also had to scuttle his navy. In 196 B.C., Flamininus proclaimed the "freedom of the Greeks" at the Isthmian Games, an event that brought a great deal of positive press for Rome. Attitudes quickly soured, however, when Rome occupied "the Fetters of Greece," three pivotal fortresses at Corinth, Chalcis and Demetrias. Philip's chastisement and Aetolian resentment laid the groundwork for the Roman-Seleucid War of 192 B.C., the Aetolian War of 191 B.C. and the Third Macedonian War of 171 B.C.

Follow Myke Cole here:
www.mykecole.com
www.facebook.com/mykecole
www.twitter.com/MykeCole

If you're following along with Myke, make sure you catch up on his last blog posts:
Entry #1: Meet Author Myke Cole as He Blogs His Trip to Greece to Research "Legion vs. Phalanx"
Entry #2: Myke Cole's Reading List: The Battles of Cynoscephalae, Thermopylae, and Pydna
Entry #3: A Day in Pydna with Myke Cole
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1. August's Book Vote and July's Results - 2017-08-01 13:34:10
This month's book vote focuses on our Elite series, as 4 potential titles battle it out for your vote:




ELI: Roman Heavy Cavalry
ELI: Raiders in New France: North American Forest War Tactics 17th & 18th Centuries
ELI: Division Lecler
ELI: Armies of Russia's War in the Ukraine






Roman Heavy Cavalry
The history of the armoured heavy cavalry that was absorbed into Roman service from the steppe peoples they defeated in the 2nd Century AD, and that came to provide half Rome's cavalry during the Late Empire.
Raiders in New France; North American Forest War Tactics 17th & 18th Centuries
The history of French/Indian tactics in forest warfare against the British New England colonies.
Division Leclerc
The battle history, men and equipment of the most famous Free French unit of World War II, led by France's best fighting general.
Armies of Russia's War in the Ukraine
Explains and illustrates Russia’s military intervention in Ukraine since 2014, describing the regular and irregular forces deployed by both sides.


Make your vote by clicking here!
Now it's time to reveal the results of last month's book vote. July's vote was focused on our Weapon series, and it was another close month with just 0.36% between the top two picks. The winner, however, with 26.47% of the vote was The Walther P38 Pistol, with the Browning Hi-Power at 26.11%, just behind. Thanks to everyone who cast their vote, and don't forget to have your say in this month's Elite vote.



WPN: The Makarov Pistol
14.05%


WPN: The Browning Hi-Power
26.11%


WPN: Smith & Wesson Revolvers
19.36%


WPN: Glock Pistols
14.01%


WPN: The Walther P38 Pistol
26.47%
2. Visiting the Aemilius Paulus Monument with Myke Cole (#5) - 2017-07-28 22:01:53

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I’m writing this from Athens, where we are currently sitting on the rooftop of our hotel, in full view of a lit up Acropolis (with Parthenon!) while drinking white wine. We spent the day in Delphi, climbing the mountainside to the ruins of the original temple where the Priestess of Apollo delivered her history-changing oracles to pretty much every major leader in the ancient world.
It was incredible traveling to Delphi, seeing the votive offerings and the “treasuries” from each Greek polis to the god, but that wasn’t my primary reason for going. I wanted to see the famous Aemilius Paulus monument, originally adorning a pillar just outside the entrance of the original temple of Apollo about halfway up the mountainside. If you haven’t read my post on the Battle of Pydna on this blog, go take a look at it now.
The Antigonid King Perseus had this pillar erected to host a bust of himself, as a means to establish the Antigonid presence close to the most important structure on Delphi (the Temple of Apollo). As we consider the various votive “treasuries” that dot the path on the way to the temple, they are grander and represent more important cities the closer you get, with (of course) the Athenian treasury being the closest.
After defeating Perseus at Pydna, Paulus laid claim to the Antigonid King’s pillar and made it his own. He established a series of four panels toward the top of the pillar which depicted the battle, and included the inscription: “L. AIMILIUS L.F. INPERATOR DE REGE PERSE MACEDONIBUSQUE CEPET” this translates roughly to “Lucius Aemilius, Imperator, took this from Perseus, King of the Macedonians.”

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The monument is an incredible source for the battle, giving us valuable clues into arms and armor, tactics and representation of groups (Gauls, Attalids) in the respective armies. Writing in Hisperia, historian Michael J. Taylor has a great article that deep-dives into the monument, reconstructing it in detail. I highly recommend that interested folks read Taylor’s article (though, of course, we disagree with some of this interpretations and hope to raise these questions in a later article).

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The Paulus monument is that rarest of things, a material source for a specific battle that can be considered alongside the literary sources, to gain a better understanding of the subject. And that the fact that it’s in the middle of the incredible archaeological site at Delphi is just icing on the cake.

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When we talk about “sources” for a topic in history, it’s critical that we are considering all of them, literary, material and also geological, the ground itself. On this trip, we’ve been fortunate enough, for Pydna at least, to tackle all three.

Follow Myke Cole here:
www.mykecole.com
www.facebook.com/mykecole
www.twitter.com/MykeCole

If you're following along with Myke, make sure you catch up on his last blog posts:
Entry #1: Meet Author Myke Cole as He Blogs His Trip to Greece to Research "Legion vs. Phalanx"
Entry #2: Myke Cole's Reading List: The Battles of Cynoscephalae, Thermopylae, and Pydna
Entry #3: A Day in Pydna with Myke Cole
Entry #4: Exploring The Battle of Cynoscephalae with Myke Cole
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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 03 авг 2017, 00:00

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1. The German Battleship SMS Posen - 2017-08-02 07:10:37
The last ship of the first class of German “Dreadnought” battleships was Ersatz Baden/Posen
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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 04 авг 2017, 00:00

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1. August's Book Vote and July's Results - 2017-08-03 15:34:33
This month's book vote focuses on our New Vanguard series, as 5 potential titles battle it out for your vote:





NVG: Naval Shell Guns 1815‒1866
NVG: British Amphibious Assault Ships 1956–present
NVG: Torpedo Motorboats 1915-1919
NVG: The Russian Navy of the Russo-Japanese War
NVG: Modern Stealth Warships






Naval Shell Guns 1815‒1866: The artillery revolution of Paixhans, Dahlgren and Armstrong
In the years after the Napoleonic Wars, the wooden warship was doomed by the development of a new breed of naval artillery. Firing explosive shells with a flat trajectory, shell guns were far more powerful than traditional cannon. Test-firings against obsolete Napoleonic warships proved that no wooden ship could survive against the new weapons, thus spurring the development of the ‘ironclad’ and a new era in naval warfare. This is the story of a revolutionary half-century of gun development, the famous guns that it produced, and their place in naval history.
British Amphibious Assault Ships 1956–present
In the second half of the 20th century the Royal Navy, still with global reach and obligations, developed the capability to project power through specialist amphibious warfare ships. From the first use of helicopters in an ship-borne assault at Suez, to the legendary Fearless and Intrepid that were essential to the Falklands campaign, and the modern Albion-class and HMS Ocean, this New Vanguard would examine their capabilities, role, and history.
Torpedo Motorboats 1915-1919: Britain’s Coastal Motor Boats and Italy’s MAS
Small, light, and fast, based on civilian speedboats and with a very limited but potentially devastating torpedo armament, these boats saw action in the North Sea, in the Mediterranean where they sank two Austro-Hungarian battleships, and most famously in the 1919-20 campaign against the Bolsheviks, during which British CMBs successfully raided the Soviet-held Kronstadt naval base.
The Russian Navy of the Russo-Japanese War
Having built up their navy with British- and French-influenced pre-dreadnought battleships, the Russian Navy was shocked by its 1905 defeat to the upstart Japanese Navy. This book would examine the battleships and cruisers of the Tsar’s bluewater fleet, their development and construction, and explains why a long-established naval power saw its fleet so dramatically destroyed.
Modern Stealth Warships
Having been pioneered in cutting-edge aircraft over many decades, stealth technology has now become mainstream in warship design, providing navies – especially greenwater ones – with the advantages of hiding from enemy radar. This would be a global survey of the state of naval stealth technology and the warships that it has spawned, from the US Navy’s famous Zumwalt-class to recent developments by the Taiwanese Navy and the use of stealth in modern European warships.
Make your vote by clicking here!
Now it's time to reveal the results of last month's book vote. July's vote was focused on our Weapon series, and it was another close month with just 0.36% between the top two picks. The winner, however, with 26.47% of the vote was The Walther P38 Pistol, with the Browning Hi-Power at 26.11%, just behind. Thanks to everyone who cast their vote, and don't forget to have your say in this month's Elite vote.




WPN: The Makarov Pistol
14.05%


WPN: The Browning Hi-Power
26.11%


WPN: Smith & Wesson Revolvers
19.36%


WPN: Glock Pistols
14.01%


WPN: The Walther P38 Pistol
26.47%
2. Osprey's Big Reveal: Men-at-Arms - 2017-08-03 10:38:50
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To navigate your way through the Big Reveal please use the links in the bar above.
Today’s post is the first in a series called the Big Reveal. Every August we unveil what’s coming to Osprey in 2018, and kicking off this year’s is our longest-running series, Men-at-Arms.
In 2018, we’re set to publish another five books in this series of over 500 titles.
World War II Vichy French Security Troops
After the Fall of France in 1940, a new puppet state was set up in the south. Officially known as the French State, it is better known as Vichy France. This collaborationist Vichy regime's armed forces were more active and usually more numerous than German troops in the task of hunting down and crushing the maquis - the French Resistance guerrilla forces.
World War II Vichy French Security Troops will cover the organization and operations of Vichy French Security Forces, including: the new Vichy Police Nationale, particularly their Groupes Mobiles de Reserve, the Service d'Ordre Légionnaire, and the Milice Francaise, a ruthless anti-Resistance militia armed partly with British weapons captured from SOE airdrops. It tells the story of Occupied France from the perspective of those who saw alliance with Germany as a necessary price in a war against Communism.
French Naval & Colonial Troops 1872–1914
France's colonial wars in sub-Saharan Africa and South-East Asia were very largely fought by an organization completely separate from both the home-defence Metropolitan Army and the Armée d'Afrique in Algeria. The Naval Troops (Troupes de la Marine) were volunteers, and earned a reputation for greater toughness and hardiness than the conscripted Metropolitan Army.
Spread throughout the French Empire, Naval Troops in this period were characterized by very large infantry and artillery regiments based in France, mixed race regiments (Régiments Mixtes), and entire native regiments raised in West Africa, Madagascar and Indochina. The latter, the so-called 'Tirailleurs’ were organized and led by officers and cadres from the Naval Troops, and wore very varied and colourful uniforms based on formalized versions of traditional local costumes
Polish Legions 1914–19
Due to its partitions and dissolution in the late eighteenth century, hundreds of thousands of Polish soldiers enlisted in distinct units in the armies of many countries – primarily those of the Russian and Austro-Hungarian empires, but also that of the German Reich and the French Republic.
All these forces were uniformed and equipped by the parent armies, though often with explicitly Polish features. The collapse of Tsarist Russia in 1917 and of the Central Powers in 1918 allowed these diverse forces to unite in a re-created Polish Army under the new-born Second Polish Republic in November 1918. This is the fascinating story of the Poles who fought on both sides in the trenches of World War I and then united to fight for their freedom when the defeat of the Central Powers gave them the opportunity
Latin American Wars 1900–1941
From the Mexican Revolution to the Zarumilla War, in the first 40 years of the 20th century the nations of Central and South America were frequently disturbed by border clashes, civil wars and revolution. Many of these conflicts became known as 'Banana Wars'. Some involved only lightly armed guerrillas, but others saw armies operating artillery and armoured vehicles, supported by aircraft and river navies. The conflicts in Honduras and Nicaragua saw the intervention of US Marines, and later wars involved armour and aircraft acquired from Europe, as well as attracting many foreign adventurers.
Armies of the Italian Wars of Unification 1848–70 (2)
In the 1840s, Italy was a patchwork of states. The North was ruled by the Austrian Empire, the South by the Spanish-descended monarchy of the Two Sicilies. Over the next two decades, after wars led by Savoy/Piedmont and volunteers such as Garibaldi, an independent Kingdom of Italy emerged. These conflicts saw foreign interventions and shifting alliances among minor states, and attracted a variety of local and foreign volunteers.
This is the second volume in the two part series which covers the armies of the Papal States; the duchies of Tuscany, Parma, and Modena; the republics of Rome and San Marco (Venice) and the transitional Kingdom of Sicily; and the various volunteer movements.

Which of these titles will you be picking up in 2018? Don’t forget to let us know your favourite, and keep checking the blog for more updates in our Big Reveal.
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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 05 авг 2017, 00:01

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1. The Triple Sprue Challenge! - 2017-08-04 08:44:25
Northstar Military Figures have started to offer individual Frostgrave sprues on their online store. That gave us an idea… So here is the Triple Sprue Challenge – get your kitbash on and win some prizes!

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Sprues, glorious sprues!
The rules are simple. Using one sprue from each of the Frostgrave humanoid boxes – Soldiers, Cultists, and Barbarians (sorry Gnoll-lovers) – you must create three figures: a Wizard, an Apprentice, and a Captain. You cannot delve into your bits-box for pieces from other ranges – only components from the three sprues (and some modelling putty and wire rods for spears, staffs etc. if you like) can be used.
To enter, please either email photos of your unpainted creations to https://ospreypublishing.com/info@ospreygames.co.uk or share your images on Instagram, Twitter, or Facebook with the hashtags #Frostgrave and #TripleSprueChallenge. All entries must be received by 30th September. We'll put together a gallery of entries at the end for everyone to enjoy.
The judges will be an elite panel of Osprey Games staff, who will be looking for clever use of the components, interesting combinations of parts, and, above all, the coolness factor. One talented winner will receive the Grand Prize: a copy of the forthcoming Frostgrave: Ghost Archipelago rulebook, the Frostgrave: Ghost Archipelago Accessory Pack and a box of the plastic Frostgrave: Ghost Archipelago Crewmen! Three runners-up will each receive a 20% discount voucher for the Frostgrave: Ghost Archipelago rulebook.
Some of us at Osprey Towers will be taking part as well, and we’ll keep you updated with what we manage to create. While we won’t be eligible for any of the prizes ourselves, we’re quite a competitive bunch, so we may well determine bragging rights here with a public vote. Watch this space…
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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 06 авг 2017, 00:01

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1. Osprey's Big Reveal: Aircraft of the Aces - 2017-08-05 14:13:00
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To navigate your way through the Big Reveal please use the links in the bar above.
There's only one title joining our list of Aircraft of the Aces series in 2018.
A6M Zero-sen Aces 1940-43
The Mitsubishi A6M Zero-sen was Japan’s Spitfire. In continuous development and operational service from the time of the Sino-Japanese war in 1940 to the end of the Pacific War in 1945, it is held in almost mythical awe, similar to Britain’s legendary fighter aircraft.
At the time of its operational debut the fighter’s design features offered the revolutionary combination of an all-round vision canopy, cannon armament and a jettisonable drop tank giving it phenomenal range. Together with the flying and tactical proficiency of superbly trained pilots, these features made the Zero-sen a true strategic fighter, spearheading Japan’s offensive in the Pacific. It was also the mount of a plethora of successful and flamboyant naval aces engaged in both sea and land campaigns.
This volume, the first of two on the A6M Zero-sen, covers the use of the A6M2 variant from its debut in China to the Solomons Campaign, and also tells the story of the A6M2-N ‘Rufe’ floatplane fighter aces.

Which of these titles will you be picking up in 2018? Don’t forget to let us know your favourite, and keep checking the blog for more updates in our Big Reveal.
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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 09 авг 2017, 00:00

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1. Abrams Squad 21 ENGLISH - 10,00 €
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Abrams Squad: The Modern Modelling Magazine is the FIRST and UNIQUE magazine in the world devoted to Modern Warfare modelling. Here you will find the best articles of the best modellers and writers in the world. Step by step articles, painting techniques, building techniques, illustrated reports, news, reviews and much more.
2. Abrams Squad 21 SPANISH - 10,00 €
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Abrams Squad: The Modern Modelling Magazine es la PRIMERA y ÚNICA revista del mercado dedicada exclusivamente a vehículos modernos. En ella podrás encontrar los mejores artículos de los mejores maquetistas del mundo. Artículos paso a paso, técnicas de pintura, de montaje, reportajes gráficos, artículos de actualidad, novedades y mucho más.
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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 09 авг 2017, 00:00

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1. The Lost Expedition - An Adventurous Playlist - 2017-08-08 09:28:00
The first time we played The Lost Expedition in the office, we were accompanied by a chorus of colleagues humming the main theme from Indiana Jones. Even without the full orchestral backing that John Williams had at his disposal, it certainly added to the sense of adventure. Each decision we made carried extra weight, perhaps because we were worried we would be letting Indy down if we messed up, lost all our food and ammunition and doomed our group to certain death.
With that in mind, we've put together a cinematic playlist that will add to the ambience of the Amazon rainforest and the excitement of your expedition. Let us know what you think, and whether you feel there are other tracks that deserve to be on the list!


Track list:
Indiana Jones Theme - John Williams
A New Course - Christopher Tin
El Condor Pasa - Inca, the Peruvian Ensemble
The Journey Commences - Dino Soldo, the Moscow Symphony Orchestra
King Kong: Stolen Love - The Cave - Max Steiner
Giant Chameleon / The Fight – Bernard Herrmann
Ojos Azules - Inca, the Peruvian Ensemble
Two New Alphas - John Powell, Gavin Greenaway
The Lost City of Chimpanzee - Michael Giacchino, Tim Simonec
The Spirit of Adventure - Michael Giacchino
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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 10 авг 2017, 00:04

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1. August Summer Sale - 2017-08-08 10:28:53
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WHAT?
This August, we're celebrating summer with our fanatastic Summer Sale. We've got thousands of titles on offer, with up to 30% off our books, eBooks, card and board games.
This includes discounts across our entire military history series list, which also includes our General Military and General Aviation titles! From Douglas AD Skyraiders to Byzantine naval forces, the military history of Sevastopol to the history of the SAS, there's sure to be something that sparks your interest!
HOW?
To navigate the sale and to see which titles are included, browse our series/period tabs on the sidebar. This will allow you to view our full catalogue. If the book/game is included in the sale it will notify you on the product page with the original price crossed out, and the new discounted price underneath in red.
The deduction amount will not be noted in your basket, but the discount will have been applied as stated on the product page. We appreciate this is different to our usual approach, but be assured you'll be saving up to 30% off!
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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 11 авг 2017, 00:01

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1. Osprey's Big Reveal: New Vanguard - 2017-08-10 08:52:00
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To navigate your way through the Big Reveal please use the links in the bar above.
Next up in the Big Reveal is our New Vanguard series, which examines the design, development, operation and history of the machinery of warfare. 2018 will see a further 12 titles added to our list, so start adding these to your wishlists, and do let us know which is your favourite!
Early US Armor: Armored Cars 1915–40
The first American armoured cars began to emerge around the turn of the century, seeing their first military use in 1916 during the Punitive Expedition against Pancho Villa. When the United States entered World War I, the American Expeditionary Forces used some armoured cars in France, and American armoured cars were used by the French Army.
The inter-war years saw considerable innovation and experimentation in armoured car design. Of the 1930s scout car designs, the M3A1 scout car was good enough to be produced in very large numbers in World War II, and was widely exported to many other armies via Lend-Lease. It also served as the basis for the late M2 and M3 armoured half-tracks.
T-90 Standard Tank
In the wake of the T-72 tank’s poor performance in the 1991 Gulf War, the Kremlin instructed the Russian tank industry to drop the discredited T-72 designation in favour of the T-90 Vladimir. The T-90 was in fact a further evolution of the T-72 family, but the name change represented an important break in Russian/Soviet tank design history. The T-90 has become the principal export tank of Russia, and is in service in large numbers in many countries including Algeria, India, and many of the former Soviet republics. This book also describes the evolution of the T-90’s many failed successors including the little-known Bokser, Molot, and T-95, as well as its likely successor, the new T-14 Armata, and the wide range of specialized vehicles based on the T-90 chassis such as the formidable Terminator tank support vehicle.
Soviet Destroyers of World War II
The Soviet Navy that faced the German onslaught in 1941 boasted a mixture of modern warships, often built with foreign technical assistance, and antiquated warships from the Tsarist era that were modernised for the conflict.
Some Soviet naval vessels saw limited involvement in the war against Finland in 1939–1940, but the main action occurred after the German invasion, when these destroyers escorted convoys, fought battles against other destroyers and the deadly threat posed by attacking aircraft, and provided fire support for Soviet troops. From the Gnevny class of the pre-war period to the specialist destroyer leaders of the Leningrad class and the unique Tashkent, Soviet Destroyers of World War II is a detailed guide to the often forgotten destroyers of the Soviet Navy.
Technicals: Non-Standard Tactical Vehicles from the Toyota War to modern Special Forces
Over the last 30 years, the ‘technical’ or armed pick-up truck has become arguably the most ubiquitous military land vehicle of modern warfare.
Harking back to the armed Jeeps and Chevrolet trucks of the SAS and LRDG in North Africa in World War II, the world’s first insurgent technicals were those of the Sahrawi People's Liberation Army in Algeria in the late 1970s, followed by the very successful Chadian use of technicals in the so-called Toyota War against Libya and its Soviet-supplied tanks. Since then, technicals have become the light cavalry of many modern battlefields, from Somalia, to Iraq, Afghanistan and Libya, often with increasingly ambitious armament. In addition, the technical, or ‘Non-Standard Tactical Vehicle’, has been adopted by Western and Russian special forces.
This is the first history of how this deceptively simple fighting vehicle has been used and developed in conflicts worldwide.
Italian Cruisers of World War II
The Italian Royal Navy (Regia Marina) operated one of the largest cruiser forces of World War II. As a signatory to the 1922 Washington Naval Treaty, the Regia Marina immediately attempted to reinforce its treaty-limited battleship force by building seven large 10,000-ton heavy cruisers. Italian light cruisers also possessed an interesting design history and were involved in every major fleet engagement in the Mediterranean, as well as several smaller encounters with units of the British Royal Navy.
US Flush-Deck Destroyers 1916–45: Caldwell-class, Wickes-class, and Clemson-class
Four pipes and flush decks – these ships were a distinctively American destroyer design. Devised immediately prior to and during the United States’ involvement in World War I they dominated the US Navy’s destroyer forces all the way through to World War II.
They were deployed on North Atlantic and Norwegian Sea convoys, and virtually everywhere in the Pacific, from Alaska to Australia. Fifty were given to Great Britain in 1940 in exchange for naval bases, and many would serve in other navies, fighting under the Soviet, Canadian, Norwegian, and even the Imperial Japanese flags. They also served in a variety of roles, becoming seaplane tenders, high-speed transports, minesweepers and minelayers. One was even used as a self-propelled mine during Operation Chariot, destroying the dry dock at St Nazaire.
Italian Armoured & Reconnaissance Cars 1912–45
The first Italian armoured cars were used in the war in Libya in 1911-12 against the Ottoman Empire. With few tanks being developed, the Italians relied instead on the development of more mobile armoured cars. These included the Ansaldo Lancia 1 Z during World War I, but post-war the army, focusing on the Alpine battlegrounds of Italy’s northern borders, did not consider armoured cars suitable for reconnaissance duties.
The experience of the Spanish Civil War would provide the much needed last push for the Italians to develop modern armoured cars. The result were the famous AB 41-43 models, which fought against the British in North Africa and Marshall Tito’s forces in Yugoslavia, along with other vehicles such as the AS 36 light armoured car.
Soviet Cruise Missile Submarines of the Cold War
The Soviet Union's cruise missile submarines, from the modified Whiskey-class to the Oscar II class, were among the most formidable vessels of the Cold War. They were initially designed to carry land-attack nuclear-tipped cruise missiles designed to strike targets on the eastern coast of the United States. By the late 1960s, however, submarine-launched ballistic missiles made the nuclear land-attack mission unnecessary, so existing classes were converted to the ‘carrier killer’ role, armed with anti-ship cruise missiles designed to destroy US super-carriers and other important naval targets.
This New Vanguard examines these powerful machines that were some of the largest and fastest submarines ever built. If war had broken out, they would have been at the forefront of the Soviet Navy's campaign to destroy NATO's sea power and cut America's sea link with Europe.
British Ironclads 1860–75: HMS Warrior and the Royal Navy's 'Black Battlefleet'
In November 1859, the French warship La Gloire was launched. She was the world's first seagoing ironclad: a warship built from wood, but whose hull was clad in a protective layer of iron plate. La Gloire was followed by other French ironclads, built along similar lines, while Britain, not to be outdone, launched her own ironclad the following year – HMS Warrior – which, when she entered service, became the most powerful warship in the world.
Just like the Dreadnought half a century later, this ship changed the nature of naval warfare forever, and sparked a frantic arms race. The elegant but powerful Warrior embodied the technological advances of the early Victorian era, and the spirit of this new age of steam, iron and firepower.
The title covers the British ironclad from its inception and emergence in 1860 when HMS Warrior entered service, to 1875, a watershed year which saw the building of a new generation of recognisably modern turreted battleships, and the start of the breechloading naval gun era. It mentions but otherwise omits Continental European ironclads, which are numerous and diverse enough to deserve their own volume.
Dutch Navies of the 80 Years’ War 1568–1648
The tiny new state of the United Provinces of the Netherlands won its independence from the mighty Spanish empire by fighting and winning the Eighty Years’ War, from 1568 and 1648. This long war was waged worldwide, from Brazil to Indonesia, from the Low Countries to Angola.
On the high seas the fleet carved out a new empire, growing national income to such levels that it could continue the costly war for independence. Major battles were fought against Spanish fleets, including the Armadas of 1588 and 1639. On coastal and inland waters even more decisive battles were fought. Arguably the most decisive Spanish siege at Leiden in 1574 was broken by a fleet sailing to the rescue across flooded polders. Coastal vessels were of course different from those sailing the oceans, and included specially designed galleys (ironically gaining superiority over the Spanish, who had brought the galley to Holland).
The war also saw a great many amphibious operations. The real start of the rebellion was the landing at and taking of Den Briel in 1572, and at the other end of the war the Dutch sailed a 4,000-man army from Brazil to Angola to take Luanda from the Portuguese. The largest successful invasion fleet before World War II was the 1,250-vessel fleet which shipped Maurice’s army to Flanders to fight the battle of Nieuwpoort in 1600.
Even deeper inland, the – sometimes very narrow – rivers played a key part in Dutch armies’ logistics and operations, even moving all of the heavy siege artillery with relative speed. The river ‘train’ was as well organised and regulated as the land train. Armed ferries and gun boats were on perpetual standby near vital bridges and in important cities. Ships with guns were an integral part of any siege force and regularly played their part during land battles.
South American Battleships 1908–59: Brazil, Argentina and Chile's great dreadnought race
In 1908 the most incredible naval arms race began. It began when Brazil decided to upgrade its navy. Flush with cash from rubber and coffee, it decided to order three of the latest, greatest category of warship available – the dreadnought battleship. When HMS Dreadnought appeared it made every other battleship obsolete. With a main battery of ten 12in guns and a broadside of eight main guns, it had twice the firepower of any other warship then afloat. In 1908 the dreadnought battleship defined naval power. The category was then less than five years old. Brazil wanted two of them – or maybe three.
One Brazilian dreadnought by itself could defeat the combined gunnery of every other warship of all the other South American nations. Brazil’s decision triggered its neighbour Argentina to order its own brace of dreadnought, which in turn forced Chile (which had fought boundary disputes with Argentina) to order its own. It was a race which would not stop until World War I started in 1914.
In the process, the South American dreadnought mania drove the three participants nearly into bankruptcy, led to the bankruptcy of a major shipyard, and triggered a chain of events which led Turkey to declare war on Great Britain. It also produced several ground-breaking dreadnought designs and one of the world’s first aircraft carriers.
Superguns 1854–1991: Extreme artillery from the Paris Gun and the V-3 to Iraq's Project Babylon
This New Vanguard examines the fantastic extremes in modern breech-loading artillery design, starting with William Armstrong's ‘Monster Gun’ in the 19th century. It will then take a look at some of the classic weapons of this type including the Wilhelm Gun that bombarded Paris in World War I, and the massive Dora gun of World War II. It then turns to more modern excursions in gun design, starting with the various German “arrow” guns of World War II including the so-called V-3 London Gun.
Cold War developments start with Soviet and American attempts at nuclear artillery including the Soviet Oka/Kondensator, and the American Atomic Cannon. It will then turn to novel approaches such as Dr Gerard Bull’s HARP gun and its descendants, including most famously Saddam Hussein’s 1m-calibre ‘Supergun’ – aka Project Babylon. It will end with a brief survey of the latest technology, including current efforts at very-long-range magnetic rail-guns.

How many of these books will be joining your collection? Don’t forget to let us know which you’re excited for in the comments!
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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 12 авг 2017, 00:01

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1. Osprey's Big Reveal: Combat Aircraft - 2017-08-11 13:37:00
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To navigate your way through the Big Reveal please use the links in the bar above.
Next up in our Big Reveal is our Combat Aircraft series, which will see 5 new titles landing onto shelves in 2018.
B-25 Mitchell Units of the CBI
The B-25 Mitchell was the only American medium bomber to operate in the China-Burma-India (CBI) Theater. Commencing operations in July 1942 in China, and a few months later from India, the B-25 flew continuously until the end of the war. For nearly a year a single squadron of B-25s were the only American bombers available in China. When this was later increased to two bomber groups, the B-25 represented a substantial portion of Allied bombing capacity in China, ultimately dropping more bombs than their larger four-engined B-24 Liberator brethren. The B-25 units in the CBI Theater flew nearly every version of the Mitchell, using the B-25 for medium altitude bombing missions, low-level strafing missions and bridge-busting missions.
Heinkel He 177 Units of World War 2
In many ways, the Heinkel He 177 ‘Greif’ (Griffon) was Nazi Germany's ‘lost’ strategic bomber. With some fundamental creases ironed out, and built in large numbers, the He 177 would have offered the Luftwaffe the means with which to carry out long-range, mass bombing attacks against targets of a strategic nature. Although competing interests and personalities served to prevent this from happening, from mid-1943 the aircraft nevertheless saw service over Britain, the Atlantic, the Mediterranean and the Soviet Union. The He 177 flew to the end of the war, with some machines undertaking extremely hazardous low-level missions against Soviet armour in Poland in late 1944-45.
Savoia-Marchetti S.79 Sparviero Bomber Units
Initially developed by Savoia-Marchetti as a transport, the S.79 had evolved into a dedicated medium bomber by the time the aircraft made its combat debut in the Spanish Civil War in 1936. During World War 2, it became Italy’s most successful bomber, and the most produced, with around 1,370 built between 1936 and early 1944. Although initially hampered by poor tactics, the S.79 bomber crews nonetheless scored sunk a number of Allied vessels, and provided a constant threat to Allied sailors in the Mediterranean in the early stages of the war. In East Africa and the Red Sea the Sparvieri were the most modern bombers in-theatre, proving a challenge to RAF and SAAF biplane fighters.
Short Stirling Units of World War 2
Of the RAF’s trio of four-engined heavy bombers in World War 2, the mighty Short Stirling was the first to enter service in August 1940. From its first raid in February 1941, the Stirling was at the forefront of the British night bombing offensive against Germany before unacceptably high losses forced its relegation to second-line duties later in the war. In its modified form as the Mark IV the Stirling fulfilled vital roles with the RAF as a paratroop transport and glider tug on D-Day, at Arnhem and on the Rhine crossing, as well as flying countless Special Duties operations over Occupied Europe and Norway. After the war, as the Mk V, the Stirling enjoyed a brief spell as a long-range passenger transport. Its last gasp was in 1948-49 when a handful of Mk Vs were acquired by the Royal Egyptian Air Force to bomb Israel in the First Arab–Israeli War.
US Navy F-4 Phantom II Units of the Vietnam War 1969-73
The F-4 Phantom II was the most important fighter-bomber to see action with all three American services during the Vietnam War, but it was essentially a US Navy design, and the carrier-borne squadron crews were its main operators in combat. The aircraft pioneered the use of long-range, radar-guided missiles in combat, although the majority of its Vietnam missions involved ground-attack with a variety of innovative ordnance. From 1968 to 1973 the Phantom II was the standard US Navy fighter in Southeast Asia, having replaced several other types. Its performance and versatility enabled it to perform a variety of different missions, and switch roles as necessary, in the assault on some of the world’s most heavily defended territory.
Which of these five new titles are you most excited for? Which will be joining your collection?
2. Triple Sprue Challenge - Phil's Wizard - 2017-08-11 08:10:15
The Triple Sprue Challenge is right up my street – I love kit-bashing, and it’s by far my favourite part of the hobby. However, I’m used to raiding several dozen different boxed sets for components, so limiting myself to just three sprues was a new challenge. Furthermore, I’m really familiar with the Frostgrave models, so looking at them in a new light and finding new conversion potential after having worked with them for so long was my main hurdle.

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I started with the Wizard, as I tend to for all my warbands. As the main character, the look of the Wizard defines the overall tone of a warband, making him the lynchpin in both game and aesthetic terms.
I’ve done a lot with the Soldiers and the Cultists in the past, so I opted to start off by selecting a Barbarian body. The one I picked, with its fur kilt and hooded cloak, gave me a degree of versatility in defining which school my Wizard would follow – the cloak was smart enough that the fur kilt could just be a nod to the temperature… or he could be a more savage outcast (with a nice cloak). As I tend to do, I opted for the latter.
I’d already pretty much decided that I wanted him to have the spear from the Cultist sprue, and finding a matching left arm gave me the ‘summoning’ pose quite easily. A couple of equipment pieces (a skull and amphora from the Cultists and a scroll pouch from the Soldiers) went on his left hip, because every Wizard needs to be carrying some tools of his trade, which just left the head…
I hummed and hawed over the choice of head for some time. By now, it was clear that my Wizard was running down a Witch/Necromancer route, so I looked for suitably shifty heads. Fortunately, the various sprues have those aplenty. In the end, I went for one of the zombie heads from the Cultist sprue – although it is heavily scarred and lined, it isn’t so far gone that it couldn’t pass a living, and it did fit well with the savage theme. A quick twist and lift, and he’s now staring off at the target of whatever spell he’s casting.
All in all, a very simple model, with minimal conversion work (I shaved the neck joint down a tad) – almost a pure kit-bash.
The Triple Sprue Challenge is a competition running throughout August and September where we challenge you to create a Wizard, Apprentice, and Captain using one sprue from each of the Frostgrave humanoid boxes – Soldiers, Cultists, and Barbarians. For more details on how to enter and the prizes up for grabs, head over to the contest blog!
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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 14 авг 2017, 00:00

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1. The Unlikely Shining Buddha - Bernhard Arp Sindberg - 2017-08-13 09:13:00
Today, 13th August 2017, marks the 80th anniversary of the beginning of the Battle of Shanghai, the largest and bloodiest battle of the Second Sino-Japanese War. In today's post, Benjamin Lai, author of CAM 309: Shanghai and Nanjing 1937, writes about one of the heroes during the conflict, Bernhard Sindberg, who saved thousands.
In the midst of a collapsing Nanjing in 1937, 20,000 people owe their lives to a remarkable 26-year-old Dane, by the name of Bernhard Sindberg (1911–1983). The Chinese in Nanjing called him Mr Xin or Xinbo, for none could pronounce his name. Born in Aarhus, Denmark to a wealthy cheese dealer, the young Bernhard must have inherited a mischievous gene for he was never satisfied with a quiet life in rural Denmark. A born escapologist, Bernhard’s first attempt to run away was at the tender age of 2. He made it as far as the gutter at the other end of the town. The second time, with the aid of a bike, he managed to reach the other end of the country to join a scout’s Jamboree. The third time he made it as far as Hamburg aboard an American steamer before being exposed as a stowaway. His parents’ divorced in the 1930s and his father lost his business due to the Great Depression. Under a cloud, Bernhard wanted out of Aarhus. At 17, Bernhard finally managed to escape, this time to America. Three years later he joined the French Foreign Legion but found the Moroccan desert a bore. After ten months of service, he went AWOL and escaped on a ship headed to Shanghai. While on board, he got into a fight with a member of the crew and found himself locked up for most of the trip to China!

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Shanghai was heaven for an adventurer like Bernhard. During his time there, he hopped from job to job including a stint as a “demonstrator” for a Danish arms merchant hoping to make a fortune from selling Danish guns to the Chinese. When the Japanese invaded Shanghai in August 1937, Bernhard worked as a driver/assistant to the British journalist Pembroke Stephens (1903–1937) who reported for the Daily Telegraph. For weeks the pair drove around Shanghai, writing about the war. They had climbed a water tower and were observing the Japanese air strike on the city, when the Japanese shot and killed Stephens, presumably mistaking him for a sniper. Bernhard found himself unemployed and due to his previous connection with guns, started work as a chief security officer for a large Danish cement factory (F.L. Smidth) at Xixia, about 15km from Nanjing. In the factory, Bernard met the only other foreigner in the factory, the German Dr Karl Günther (1903–1987) who spoke perfect Chinese. Karl was born in China and was in Nanjing as the manager of the factory, a job he held until 1950.
Eleven days into the job, the Japanese invaded and the atrocities began. Bernhard travelled around Nanjing and the surrounding area, documenting the atrocities with his camera.To avoid Japanese bombing, Bernhard and Karl painted, what Bernhard later proudly described as the world’s largest Dannebrog and an equally large German swastika on the roof of the factory. The Chinese soon became aware that the cement factory was a haven from the Japanese and some 6000 took refuge. With the help of some Chinese nurses, Bernhard created a small clinic in the factory and did his best to provide patients with food, medicine and necessities from the Red Cross. Not content with saving 6000 people, Karl and Bernhard went to Xixia Temple and created another “safety zone”, saving another 15,000 people, by fencing off the temple with a series of neatly hand painted Dannebrog and Swastika flags. Bernhard had, after all, trained as a sign writer before he left for America!
After almost three months, the Japanese ran out of patience, and Bernhard was deported from China and forced to return to Europe. Arriving in Italy, Bernhard was met by his father, for throughout his escapade in Nanjing Bernhard had been corresponding with a friend in Aarhus who promptly re-told the story to the local newspaper, not realising that Sindberg Senior had moved professions from a cheese merchant to a newspaper editor.
On the way home father and son went to Geneva, where Bernhard was thanked by the Chinese delegation to the League of Nation. However Bernhard asked that the reporters not include his name in their articles as he was still afraid that the French Foreign Legion would still be looking for him!

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Bernhard later immigrated to the United States and became the captain of an American merchant vessel. During World War II, he served in the US Navy and was received by President Harry S. Truman for his contribution to the war effort. Bernhard never spoke about his time in Nanjing to anyone and always avoided the limelight. Because of this, Bernhard’s remarkable exploits may have remained hidden if not for the publication of Rabe’s diary in 1997 when people first heard of a Dane by the name of Mr Xin.
In 2000, a Chinese government sponsored exhibition on the Nanjing Massacre arrived in Aarhus. The local newspaper Aarhus Stiftstidende ran an article in search of people who knew a Dane who had been in Nanjing in 1937–1938. 74-year-old Bitten Stenvig Andersen was looking forward to her daily crossword when she spotted the appeal in the newspaper. Bitten knew immediately that it was her older brother. She contacted the Chinese embassy in Denmark, and as they say, the rest is history.
A special yellow rose known as a "Sindberg Rose" was presented by Queen Margrethe II of Denmark to the Nanjing Massacre Memorial Hall in memory of Bernhard Sindberg. Inside the museum, a silk scarf with the words “Brave Deeds of a Good Samaritan” given to Bernhard by the people he saved sits alongside his passport and pictures of him and Karl.
To read more by Benjamin Lai, see his previous blog posts on the conflict, The Battle of Shanghai 1937 and John Rabe and Nanjing 1937. His book CAM 309: Shanhai and Nanjing 1937 is now available to order through our website.
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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 16 авг 2017, 00:00

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1. Osprey's Big Reveal: X-Planes - 2017-08-15 13:20:00
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To navigate your way through the Big Reveal please use the links in the bar above.
In today’s instalment of the Big Reveal, we’re looking at what’s to come in our X-Planes series. 2017 has already seen two new X-Planes titles, with TSR2 and Bell X-2 still to come, but what’s in store for 2018?
North American XB-70 Valkyrie
Of the many futuristic military aircraft concepts created in the 1950s, the North American XB-70 still stands out as the most awe-inspiring. With its huge, white, partially-folding delta wing, its fuselage that resembled a striking cobra and its extraordinary performance, it was one of the foremost technological achievements of the 20th century.
A strategic bomber built to outrun any Soviet fighter jet, it could reach Mach 3 with a full nuclear payload – as fast as the legendary SR-71 Blackbird, despite being more than three times the size. However, its usefulness as a nuclear bomber was limited by the introduction of ICBMs, and the Soviet Union’s development of high-altitude surface-to-air missiles meant it was no longer invulnerable, despite its speed and ceiling. Two prototypes were built and undertook a high-speed NASA test programme in the 1960s, one being destroyed in a crash that killed former X-15 test pilot Joe Walker, before the hugely expensive project finally ended.
Bachem Ba 349 Natter
The Bachem Ba 349 Natter was Germany’s secret, vertically launched, single-seat rocket interceptor intended to offer high-speed defence of key targets. This radical aircraft, somewhat like a manned surface-to-air missile, offered the Luftwaffe an inexpensive chance to intercept and attack Allied heavy bombers with a semi-expendable machine built of wood and armed with a nose-mounted ‘honeycomb’ battery of spin-stabilised air-to-air rockets as well as cannon. Launched vertically at 36,000ft per minute, the pilot was expected to fly to within range of the enemy bombers, fire his rockets at them, ram another bomber, eject and parachute to the ground. However, the only test-launch in spring 1945 resulted in the death of the pilot, and further development was cut short by the end of the war.
This study examines this inventive but ultimately unsuccessful attempt to defend Germany against the tide of Allied aircraft that was bombing German cities into the ground.
Dornier Do 335
One of several Dornier designs to feature a push-pull power configuration, with a forward engine driving a tractor propeller and an aft engine driving a pusher, the Do 335 was conceived as a high-speed, all-weather fighter, representing the pinnacle of piston-engined aircraft design. Indeed, had jet engine technology not emerged, the Do 335 would probably have set the way forward for future development of piston-engined aircraft.
The Do 335 was a big aircraft, weighing just over 10,000kg when laden with fuel, equipment and pilot, yet powered by two Daimler-Benz DB 603 engines, it was capable of reaching a maximum speed of 750km/h at 6,400m, making it the fastest piston-engined aircraft produced in Germany during World War II.
Some 40 aircraft were built between late 1943 and the end of the war, and it was intended to deploy the type as a day fighter, bomber, night fighter, bad-weather interceptor and reconnaissance aircraft, all of which were intended to incorporate the latest armament, bomb sights, communications and radar equipment, as well as an ejector seat.
A handful were finished before the end of the war, and some Tempest and Mustang pilots claimed to have encountered Do 335s in April 1945, though without catching one.

Which of these will be joining your collection next year? Let us know in the comments section below.
2. How to Play: Zoo Ball! - 2017-08-15 09:30:32
Victory in Zoo Ball takes brains and brawn. Sure, you can just put your pieces on the playing mat and ferociously flick them at your opposition (their pieces, not directly at them), but a true champion combines powerful finger muscles with a sound tactical mind.
These rules videos will help you get an early understanding of how the game works, and let you start planning out your offensive and defensive formations.

The two-player rules, for when you want to take your opponent on head-to-head.

The four-player rules, where things get a little more chaotic!
Zoo Ball is our new dexterity game by Duncan Molloy, where players try to clear a path to the opponent's goal with their blockers and shoot with their scorer. It will be released on the 24th of August.
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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 18 авг 2017, 00:00

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1. En préparation sur mon écran : La Jagdgeschwader 54 - 2017-08-17 07:12:00
Bonjour,Le hasard fait que pendant deux mois j’ai travaillé sur le même sujet, mais pour deux éditions différentes !Il s’agit de la célèbre JG 54, il en résulte 60 profils différents, plus deux qui sont communs aux deux éditions.Pour Erik Mombeeck le « Luga special Unit» n°3 avec 32 profils. Ensuite pour Lela presse dans la collection « Histoire des unités » : Les aigles ‘au cœur vert’ Tome 1 de Philippe Saintes, 30 profils, il paraitra au mois de décembre.L’une est en français, l’autre en anglais, avec deux approches très différentes.Voici deux exemples de profils, les couleurs et camouflages de cette unité sont connus pour leur originalité !

http://www.avions-bateaux.com/produit/les-livres/3277*
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