Новини - литература и периодика - Архив 2017г.

Раздел за фирмени новини
Потребителски аватар
Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България
Мнения: 15383
Регистриран: 02 яну 2012, 19:25

Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 18 авг 2017, 00:00

Blog
Blog

1. Osprey's Big Reveal: Weapon - 2017-08-17 15:05:00
MAA
ACE
NVG
COM
XPL
WPN
???
???
???
???
???
???
???
???
???
???




To navigate your way through the Big Reveal please use the links in the bar above.
It's time to arm yourself, as we bring you an exclusive look at WPN 60-65, coming in 2018!
The “Trapdoor” Springfield: From the Little Bighorn to San Juan Hill
Intended to replace the proliferation of different small arms fielded by US forces during the American Civil War, the “Trapdoor Springfield” was designed in 1865–66 by Erskine S. Allin. Using metallic cartridges, it could be loaded in a single action, increasing the number of shots per minute as much as fivefold. The new weapon quickly proved its worth in two separate incidents in August 1867: small groups of US soldiers and civilians armed with the trapdoor repulsed numerically superior Native American contingents. A simple and cost-effective weapon, it was used, along with its variants in every US conflict in the three decades after the Civil War, especially on the American frontier.
The Anti-Tank Rifle
The emergence of the tank in World War I led to the development of the first infantry weapons to defend against tanks. Anti-tank rifles became commonplace in the inter-war years and in the early campaigns of World War II in Poland and the Battle of France, which saw renewed use in the form of the British .55in Boys anti-tank rifle - also used by the US Marine Corps in the Pacific. The French campaign made it clear that the day of the anti-tank rifle was ending due to the increasing thickness of tank armour.
Nevertheless, anti-tank rifles continued to be used by the Soviets on the Eastern Front with two rifles, the 14.5mm PTRS and PTRD, and were still in widespread use in 1945. They served again with Korean and Chinese forces in the Korean War, and some have even appeared in Ukraine in 2014–15.
The Crossbow
Technologically sophisticated and powerful, the crossbow has long enjoyed a popular reputation for villainous superiority as it enabled a peasant to take out a fully armoured noble knight from great range. The study of bow designs, trigger mechanisms and spanning devices reveals a tale of considerable mechanical ingenuity; advances that produced a battlefield weapon requiring comparatively little training to use. It was an extremely useful weapon, and especially effective in siege warfare for both attack and defence.
Known to the Ancient Greeks and the Chinese as early as the 5th century BC, the crossbow developed both in Western Europe and in the Far East. Advances in trigger mechanisms, spanning and bow design allowed the development of ever more powerful bows.
The FN MAG Machine Gun: M240, L7, and other variants
For six decades, the 7.62mm FN MAG has been a dominant general-purpose machine gun (GPMG) in worldwide arsenals. Three qualities have guaranteed this enduring status – reliability, ease of operation, and firepower. Several nations have license-produced the weapon as their standard GPMG, including the British (as the L7) and the Americans (M240), and in total more than 80 nations have adopted the FN MAG. The machine gun has also been modified extensively for vehicular, naval, and aircraft platforms, demonstrating versatility on air, sea, and land.
The Luger
Patented in 1898 and produced from 1900, Georg Luger’s iconic semi-automatic pistol became synonymous with Germany’s armed forces throughout both world wars. Rugged, accurate and well made, it was a sought-after souvenir for Allied troops and remains popular among collectors today.

The Luger’s toggle-locked, recoil-operated action worked well with high-pressure cartridges. Initially chambered for the 7.65×21mm round, from 1902 the Luger was designed for DWM’s 9×19mm round, which even today remains the most popular military handgun cartridge. It was adopted by the Reichsmarine, the Imperial German Navy, in 1904, followed by the Deutsches Heer, the German Army, in 1908, receiving the name Pistole 08. With a 20cm barrel and a shoulder stock, the Lange Pistole 08 or ‘Artillery Luger’ was issued to artillerymen in place of the rifles or carbines typically used by other countries’ supporting arms. Although it didn’t prove successful in a full-automatic configuration, when combined with a shoulder stock and a ‘snail’ magazine the Luger proved to be a lethal close-quarters trench-warfare weapon offering a much better rate of fire than a rifle or a carbine. Despite being supplanted by the Walther P 38, the Luger remained in widespread service with all arms of Nazi Germany’s armed forces throughout World War II, and even equipped East Germany’s Volkpolizei in the years after 1945.
The Sterling Submachine Gun
One of the Cold War’s most iconic weapons, the 9mm Sterling submachine gun saw action in more than 50 conflicts. Adopted by over 40 countries, it was in front-line service around the world for nearly 60 years. The Sterling’s advanced design placed its pistol grip at the weapon’s point of balance, making it an extremely handy weapon which was so well balanced it could be aimed and fired with one hand; helical cuts made to its bolt ensured the gun continued to function even when dirty.
The Sterling was used by military and police forces around the world and continues to be found in warzones today, with the Kurdish Peshmerga recently photographed armed with them. It was centre stage for many of Britain’s post-colonial conflicts from Malaya to Kenya and from Yemen to Northern Ireland. The silenced L34A1 Sterling-Patchett entered service in 1966 and first saw action deep in the jungles of Vietnam in the hands of the elite special forces of Australia, New Zealand and the United States during prisoner snatches and reconnaissance patrols.
How many of these will be joining your Weapon collection? Let us know your thoughts in the comments!
Потребителски аватар
Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България
Мнения: 15383
Регистриран: 02 яну 2012, 19:25

Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 19 авг 2017, 00:01

Blog
Blog

1. Samurai Gardener - Gen Con Preview - 2017-08-18 11:52:58
Gen Con is underway, and Osprey Games are right in the thick of it! Come find us at booth #2535, pick up some of our latest games and get a look at what we’ve got coming up.
Of course, not everyone can make it to Indianapolis. We don’t want the #GenCant attendees to feel left out, so let’s take a look at Samurai Gardener, one of our upcoming releases that we are previewing at Gen Con. Here’s Filip to tell you more!

Samurai Gardener is currently available to preorder, and will be out in early October.
Потребителски аватар
Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България
Мнения: 15383
Регистриран: 02 яну 2012, 19:25

Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 22 авг 2017, 00:00

Blog
Blog

1. Osprey's Big Reveal: Duel - 2017-08-21 14:33:00
MAA
ACE
NVG
COM
XPL
WPN
DUE
???
???
???
???
???
???
???
???
???




To navigate your way through the Big Reveal please use the links in the bar above.
Which machines will be going head-to-head in our Duel series? It's time to find out in today's Big Reveal.
B-52 Stratofortress vs SA-2 ‘Guideline’ SAM
The losses of several of its most feared, powerful and supposedly invincible bombers per night to a torrent of Soviet missiles during the closing stages of the Vietnam War was sobering to Americans, but the B-52s’ crushing attacks virtually eliminated North Vietnam’s defences and forced a peace settlement. Originally designed to protect the B-52 in its long-ranging nuclear attacks, at both high and low altitudes, the bomber’s comprehensive ECM suites were the finest available. With the addition of chaff ‘corridors’ dropped ahead of the bombers to fool enemy radars, the massive waves of B-52s taking part in Arc Light and Linebacker attacks were able to survive the most hostile missile launches. This book will analyse the roles of the SA-2 operators and the B-52 Electronic Warfare Officers (EWOs) and traces the cat-and-mouse tactics that each side employed. The shortcomings of ECM equipment in the B-52G are explained, and there are first-hand accounts from B-52 crew members and SA-2 operators of combat involving B-52s and SAMs. EWOs from more recent conflicts share their experiences and explain how ECM systems have evolved and improved since the 1960s.
F6F Hellcat vs N1K1/2 Shiden/Shiden-Kai: 1945
By the early months of 1945 in the Pacific, the US Navy’s burgeoning force of carrier-based F6F-3/5 Hellcats had pretty much wiped the skies clear of Japanese fighters during a series of one-sided aerial engagements during the highly successful ‘island hopping’ campaign towards Japan’s Home Islands. It had proven itself the master of the Imperial Japanese Naval Air Force’s A6M Zero-sen, and had also beaten its replacement, the rarely seen J2M Raiden, on the few occasions it was encountered in 1944. However, in October of that year in the skies over Formosa and the Philippines, a new radial-engined machine was fleetingly engaged in a series of bitter actions that resulted in Hellcat units suffering uncharacteristically high losses. The type they had encountered was the Kawanishi N1K1-J Shiden – a fighter privately developed by the manufacturer from its N1K Kyofu floatplane fighter. Only a small number were built, and these suffered from engine maladies – a common affliction for late-war Japanese fighters. By early 1945, production examples of the improved N1K2-J Shiden-Kai had started to reach a newly formed unit, the 343rd Kokutai, staffed by combat veterans and charged with defending the Japanese Home Islands. Its pilots would duly claim more than 170 aerial victories with the aeroplane over Kyushu and whilst escorting Kamikazes attacking Allied ships off Okinawa. A number of these victories were over carrier-based F6F Hellcats, literally hundreds of which flew marauding strikes over Japan from February 1945 through to war’s end. US Navy Hellcat pilots in turn were credited with many of the 100+ Shiden-Kais that were downed attempting to defend Japan.
P-39/P-400 Airacobras vs A6M2/3 Zero-sen: New Guinea 1942RAF Fighters vs Luftwaffe Bombers
After the huge advances made in the early months of the Pacific war, it was in remote New Guinea where the advance of Imperial Japanese Naval Air Force (IJNAF) A6M Zero-sen fighters was first halted due to a series of offensive and defensive aerial battles ranging from treetop height up to 30,000 ft.
Initially, Australian Kittyhawks were pitted against the IJNAF, but by May 1942 they had fought themselves into oblivion, and were relieved by USAAF P-39 and P-400 Airacobras. The battles unfolded over mountainous terrain with treacherous tropical weather. Neither IJNAF or USAAF pilots had been trained for such extreme conditions, incurring many additional losses aside from those that fell in combat. Using specially commissioned artwork and contemporary photographs and testimony, this fascinating study explains how, despite their initial deficit in experience and equipment, the Airacobras managed to square the ledger and defend New Guinea.
Zeppelin vs British Home Defence 1916–18
When Ferdinand Graf von Zeppelin’s rigid airship LZ 1 flew over Lake Constance in 1900, it was the most advanced and impressive flying machine in the world: a colossal, lighter-than-air craft capable of controlled flight. In World War I, Zeppelins were first used in a reconnaissance role, but on 19 January 1915 Kaiser Wilhelm II authorised their use in bombing strategic targets in England.
From then on, ‘Zeppelin’ became synonymous with terror to the British, and indeed the airship's effectiveness was more psychological than material. Still, their raids compelled the Royal Flying Corps and Royal Naval Air Service to embark on a program of modernising their aerial defences, accelerating a process that would ultimately make the aeroplane, rather than the airship, the paramount flying machine of the war. Using specially commissioned artwork, contemporary photographs and first-hand accounts, this book tells the fascinating story of Britain’s first Blitz from the airships who terrorised the public to the men who sought to defend the skies.
RAF Fighters vs Luftwaffe Bombers: Battle of Britain
The Battle of Britain was a fight for survival against a seemingly unstoppable foe. With the German army poised to invade, only the fighters of the Royal Air Force stood between Hitler and the conquest of Britain. Losses were high on both sides, but the Spitfires, Hurricanes, Havocs and Defiants of the RAF began to take their toll on the overextended, under-protected Kampfgruppen of Heinkel He 111s, Junkers Ju 87s and 88s, and Dornier Do 17s.
Both sides learned and adapted as the campaign went on. As the advantage began to shift from the Luftwaffe to the RAF, the Germans were forced to switch from round-the-clock bombing to only launching night-raids, often hitting civilian targets in the dreaded Blitz. This beautifully illustrated study dissects the tactics and technology of the duels in this new kind of war, bringing the reader into the cockpits of the RAF fighters and Luftwaffe bombers to show precisely where the Battle of Britain was won and lost.
British Destroyer vs German Destroyer
The opening months of World War II saw Britain’s Royal Navy facing a resurgent German navy, the Kriegsmarine. Following the German invasion of Denmark and Norway in early April 1940, British and German destroyers would clash in a series of battles for control of the Norwegian coast. The operational environment was especially challenging, with destroyer crews having to contend with variable weather, narrow coastal tracts and possibility of fog and ship breakdowns.
As part of the invasion effort, the Germans sent ten destroyers carrying 1,900 mountain troops to capture the vital port of Narvik on the Norwegian coast on 9 April. Having encountered scattered resistance, the German destroyer flotilla was forced to loiter and refuel there, with resupply taking longer than anticipated as the wider campaign intensified. On 10 April five British destroyers entered the harbour and surprised the Germans, sinking two Kriegsmarine destroyers and damaging three more before withdrawing; two British destroyers were lost. On 13 April, nine British destroyers accompanied by a battleship and air support re-entered Narvik harbour, sinking three German destroyers and forcing the surviving vessels to scuttle. In all, ten German destroyers were lost, halving at a stroke the number at Hitler’s disposal.
Cromwell vs Jagdpanzer IV: Normandy 1944
By 1944, the evolution of armoured doctrine had produced very different outcomes in Britain and Germany. Offering a good balance of speed, protection and firepower, the British Cromwell tank was much faster than its German opponent, but the Jagdpanzer IV tank destroyer had a high-velocity main gun and a lower profile that made it formidable on the defensive, especially in ambush situations. The two types would fight in a series of bloody encounters, from the initial days of the struggle for Normandy through to its climax as the Allies sought to trap their opponents in the Falaise Pocket.
Sagger Anti-Tank Missile vs M60 Main Battle Tank: Yom Kippur War 1973
The 1973 Yom Kippur War rewrote the textbook on the tactics of modern armored warfare. Unlike the previous major Arab-Israeli war of 1967, the Israeli Defense Forces (IDF) faced an enemy that had invested heavily in modern Soviet weapon systems and tactics.
This addition to the Duel series explains how the effective use of the Soviet-supplied AT-3 Sagger (9M14 Malyutka) anti-tank missile allowed small Arab tank-killing teams to destroy Israeli armor at an astonishing rate. It also analyses the tank that opposed it, the US-built M60A1, which had to fight for survival against the Arab Saggers, and shows how in both the Sinai and the Golan Heights, the IDF quickly learned that firepower and infantry/artillery cooperation were the keys to their survival.
USN Fleet Destroyer vs IJN Fleet Submarine: The Pacific 1941–43
The key premise of Japanese naval strategy leading up to the Pacific War was that a decisive fleet engagement would be fought against the United States Navy in the western Pacific. Outnumbered by the USN, the Imperial Japanese Navy planned to use its large, ocean-going submarines to inflict attrition on its opponent before the grand battle. In order to accomplish this, the IJN’s submarine force was tasked to perform extended reconnaissance of the USN’s battle fleet, even in port, and then shadow and attack it.
The commonly accepted conclusion is that IJN submarines were ineffective in their primary mission of attacking major USN fleet units. Nevertheless, Japanese submarines did this on several occasions in 1941–42 at little cost to themselves. This book examines whether the common wisdom is true.

As always, do discuss below which titles are taking your interest! Which Duel will win the battle to be on your shelf?
2. Triple Sprue Challenge - Filip's Wizard - 2017-08-21 08:29:48
I was pretty pleased to hear about the Triple Sprue Challenge, because I had long wanted to make a Frostgrave warband out of some older conversions I had lying around, but lacked the essential pieces of the puzzle: a wizard and their apprentice! The models in question were a set of ghost soldiers, the only conversion I’d done is replace human heads with skulls and let a very simple paint scheme do the rest of the work (I’m sure you’ll see them on this blog before too long!) Being ghosts, it was pretty clear that I needed a necromancer to lead the gang.

Изображение



Before even touching the sprues I already knew a few things about the wizard. He searches for the power to control life and death not to escape his mortality, but to deliver it to his restless warriors. For him and his followers, transformation from fully living to a twisted facsimile of immortality wasn’t the aim, but an unintended curse. This wasn’t a character that revelled in his undeath, simply a wizard constrained by a body not completely flesh and blood.
Choosing the skull head was an easy first step. The entire warband was going to be without proper faces, and the wizard was definitely going to fall in line with this pattern. I liked the slimness of the cultist bodies in general, but also how dynamic the one I went for was – I wanted to get the sense that my wizard was agitated and perhaps desperate in his search for the magicks that could free him. I gave him a skeletal arm to highlight his slow decay, but kept the other arm human because I didn’t want him to be fully undead. Having both hands empty and outstretched creates the sense that he is weaving a vast and powerful spell.
He turned out very simple, but then that’s what I wanted. He is clearly twisted by undeath, and there is a lot of scope to make him take centre-stage of the warband with my tool of choice: my paintbrush.
The Triple Sprue Challenge is a competition running throughout August and September where we challenge you to create a Wizard, Apprentice, and Captain using one sprue from each of the Frostgrave humanoid boxes – Soldiers, Cultists, and Barbarians. For more details on how to enter and the prizes up for grabs, head over to the contest blog!
Потребителски аватар
Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България
Мнения: 15383
Регистриран: 02 яну 2012, 19:25

Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 24 авг 2017, 00:00

Blog
Blog

1. Osprey's Big Reveal: Raid - 2017-08-23 15:15:00
MAA
ACE
NVG
COM
XPL
WPN
DUE
RAID
???
???
???
???
???
???
???
???




To navigate your way through the Big Reveal please use the links in the bar above.

It's the moment you've all been waiting for, RAID is back in 2018 with one very exciting title!
Heroics at Telemark: Sabotaging Hitler's atomic bomb, Norway 1942–44
In May 1941, Norwegian Section of SOE received a dossier warning of the dangers of a hydroelectric fertiliser plant in Norway – for this plant, Vemork, also produced heavy water, an essential part of making plutonium for nuclear weapons. When the Germans overran Norway the entire stock had been smuggled out of the country, but the plant was intact and soon producing heavy water again, destined for the German nuclear programme.
Despite the difficulties of getting to and operating in such a remote, hostile area, SOE Norway Section decided it had to destroy the plant. Operation Grouse inserted ski-borne Norwegian commandos to establish a presence on the harsh plateau; followed by glider-borne engineers to attack the plant. But the gliders and a Halifax tug crashed en route, and the survivors were found and shot.
Despite the massive increase in security around the plant, SOE tried again. Operation Gunnerside infiltrated another six ski-borne commandos, who got past the 300 heavily armed guards through a ravine the Germans thought impassable, blew up the electrolysis cells, and escaped the way they had come, evading the pursuing Germans on skis. The plant was later bombed from the air, and then a ferry carrying the last heavy water to Germany was sabotaged and sunk as it crossed a deep lake.
At the war’s end, despite the damage that SOE caused in Norway, a plant in Bavaria was discovered that nearly had enough heavy water to develop a bomb. In the opinion of the SOE historian M.R.D. Foot the raid was of ‘cardinal importance’ and alone justified the existence of the organisation.

Изображение

What do you make of RAID 50? Do let us know if this will be joining your Osprey collection. Also. who else loves the cover as much as we do?
Потребителски аватар
Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България
Мнения: 15383
Регистриран: 02 яну 2012, 19:25

Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 25 авг 2017, 00:00

Blog
Blog

1. Train to Nowhere - 2017-08-24 09:00:00

Изображение

Today marks the release of the captivating memoir of Anita Leslie, Train to Nowhere. Leslie, daughter of a Baronet and cousin of Sir Winston Churchill, became a female ambulance driver during World War II, first for the MTC and then the Free French Forces, serving in Libya, Syria, Palestine, Italy, France and Germany. Below is the introduction to the fascinating memoir, published by Bloomsbury.
Anita Leslie was not the sort of person usually found on a battlefield. During the first winter of the Second World War, when both her brothers and most of her friends were active in the fight against Hitler, Anita was cubbing in Northamptonshire. She wrote to her friend Rose Burgh: ‘I feel I am “helping the war effort” by having as pleasant a time as possible which is just what he [Hitler] doesn’t want.’ Later, from London, she wrote to her mother, Marjorie, in Ireland: ‘You can’t imagine how bored people are with the war here. No one wants to listen to fancy speeches.’ The fancy speeches were made by Anita’s cousin, Winston Churchill, and inspired a nation.
What persuaded Anita to volunteer for active service was a need to escape from an exhaustingly tangled personal life, circumstances not referred to in her searing war memoir, Train to Nowhere. She enlisted as a driver in the mechanized transport corps (MTC), a voluntary organization much favoured by upper class young women such as Anita, who could afford to pay for their own chic uniform designed by the couturier Hardy Amies. As she sailed to Pretoria on the Arundel Castle through U-boat infested waters, she revelled in the novelty of freedom, writing to Rose: ‘Never again am I going to live a dull domesticated existence – I’m just going to be naughtier and naughtier! He he. ’ She may sound shallow but she came from a class that required its young girls to be light-headed and giddy. ‘Smile dear, it costs nothing,’ Anita’s grandmother, Lady Leonie Leslie, often admonished her. Marjorie’s advice to her daughter, about to head off to the Desert War, was ‘Don t get sunburned in Africa – men hate it. ’
In Cairo, the MTC tended the wounded in intense heat, hot winds and ‘maddening discomfort’ before being incorporated into the auxiliary territorial service (ATS) when the unit reached Alexandria. Anita, sensing correctly that it would be stuck in Egypt when the war moved elsewhere, manoeuvred herself into more adventurous roles – editing a newspaper, the Eastern Times, joining the Transjordan Frontier Force, where she delivered supplies to isolated field hospitals in Lebanon and Syria with her friend Pamela Wavell, who made these hazardous trips wearing a white dress and picture hat.

Изображение
Anita and soldiers posing with a tank
In 1944, after three years in the Middle East, she asked the Red Cross for a transfer to Italy, wanting to be in ‘the fight that lies ahead in Europe. ’ In Naples, feeding the casualties from Anzio and Cassino was ‘like trying to run a canteen in Dante’s Inferno.’ She remarked of the British Tommies: ‘Somehow it is their humour and courage that no one else seems to have when blown to bits. ’ It was dauntingly rewarding work but Anita wanted even more involvement. In Train to Nowhere she wrote: ‘I had a faint selfish hope that the war would not end before I had time for some startling achievement.’ For that hope to be achieved, she had to join the French Forces which, unlike the British Army, allowed women on the front line. And now what might be called Anita’s real war, the one that gave her the reputation of une Anglaise formidable began. On 15 August, the day of the allied landings in southern France, the Red Cross handed Anita over to the French Forces. Dossiers were demanded, including ‘a certificate stating that the British Government did not mind what was done to me … there were unpleasant clauses about deserters getting shot. ’ In October, Anita landed at Marseilles. She was now un simple soldat de 2 è me classe .

They did things differently in France. Train to Nowhere is dedicated to Anita’s commanding offi cer, Jeanne de l’Espée. Her first command to the new recruit was ‘Whatever happens, remember to use lipstick because it cheers the wounded. ’ In England, the iconic blonde bombshell recruiting poster designed by Abram Games for the ATS was rejected as being too glamorous. Amid the sound of gunfire, kitted out in American soldiers ’ outfits, including ‘comic underwear ’ – a far cry from Hardy Amies couture – eating tinned beans off tin plates, Anita was a front-line ambulance driver in the 1st French Armoured Division and played a vital part in the liberation of France. Driving in the pitch-dark through woods full of Germans, Anita wrote to Marjorie that she had never enjoyed life more. The fighting went on for months as the allies drove north-eastwards towards the Rhine, with heavy casualties on both sides. How sharply, and horrifyingly, Anita describes the battlefields: ‘In all directions, men advancing through the fi elds were suddenly blown up in a fountain of scarlet snow.’

Изображение
Letter home on Hitler's notepaper, given to Anita by a Russian officer at the Reich Chancelleryas a trophy after the fall of Berlin
The story told in Train to Nowhere is one of dancing among the skulls. The ambulanciè res splash about joyfully in Marshal Pétain’s bathtub and drink his delicious wines just hours after he has been hastily evacuated. Then two of the girls, sisters Lucette and Odette Lecoq, are ambushed and murdered by retreating Germans. Lucette’s body is ‘still warm’ when found; the Red Cross flag is still flying on their ambulance. Anita’s final war work is as sombre. She is sent to bring back to France the survivors of the Nordhausen labour camp. These ‘shivering, exhausted wretches ’ were scarcely alive. Anita wrote: ‘Better if the whole earth remained desolate as the moon if this is all mankind can make of it.’ On 15 August 1945, in Wittlich, the Rhineland city on the Moselle, Anita in a freshly ironed skirt cut out of a GI’s trousers, polished boots, neatly-turned down white socks and white gloves had the Croix de guerre pinned on her shirt as the band played the Marseillaise. In September she was demobilized.

Train to Nowhere, subtitled ‘An ambulance driver’s adventures on four fronts’ was first published in August 1948 and was widely considered to be the best book about the war to have been written by a woman – a dubious compliment. Reviewers recognized Anita’s ‘impersonal integrity’ and her unique point of view, ‘a terse, keen reticence and the summing up of deadly situations in a line or two’ TheTimes. The book sold out quickly, was reprinted twice and then forgotten. In the early post-war years, women were under pressure to revert to their pre-war role of angel in the house. Nobody wanted to hear about their exploits in bombed out villages or rescuing the dying in fields of blood. Anita herself didn’t write or talk about the war until 1983 when she wrote a lighter version of her wartime life. By that time, she had become well known for her gossipy biographies of her Churchill and Leslie relations. How gratifying that Train to Nowhere, the most heartfelt and absorbing of her books, is being revived for a new readership.
Penny Perrick 2017
Click here to read more and purchase your copy of Train to Nowhere, now available.
Потребителски аватар
Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България
Мнения: 15383
Регистриран: 02 яну 2012, 19:25

Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 26 авг 2017, 00:00

Blog
Blog

1. Triple Sprue Challenge - Pete's Wizard - 2017-08-25 06:20:00
For the Triple Sprue Challenge, I made the decision right from the outset that I wanted a strong story to carry across my Wizard, Apprentice, and Captain. Once all three have been revealed hopefully this will hold true, but for now here is Ezekiel, my Necromancer.


Изображение


Of my three figures, Ezekiel is definitely the simplest, in part because he was the last one I put together. Nevertheless, I am quite happy with him. The pieces are drawn almost entirely from the Cultist set, with the only exception being the pouch on his left hip, which comes from the Soldier sprue.
I wanted to capture him in the act of casting a spell, whilst also showing the way that his dark magic has ravaged his body. His withered right arm and hideously contorted face (aside: I love this head!) are the price he has paid for his powers, and as he continues to delve into the dark arts no doubt the transformation will continue. But why did he choose this path? Well, all shall be revealed when we look at his Captain and Apprentice.
Given the limitations of the Triple Sprue Challenge and the pieces I had left at my disposal after putting together my other two figures, I’m happy with Ezekiel. I’m toying with the idea of adding some extra detail to the base (perhaps some skeletal arms bursting from the ground) but might just leave him as he is.
The Triple Sprue Challenge is a competition running throughout August and September where we challenge you to create a Wizard, Apprentice, and Captain using one sprue from each of the Frostgrave humanoid boxes – Soldiers, Cultists, and Barbarians. For more details on how to enter and the prizes up for grabs, head over to the contest blog!
2. How to Play: Zoo Ball! - 2017-08-24 09:30:32
Victory in Zoo Ball takes brains and brawn. Sure, you can just put your pieces on the playing mat and ferociously flick them at your opposition (their pieces, not directly at them), but a true champion combines powerful finger muscles with a sound tactical mind.
These rules videos will help you get an early understanding of how the game works, and let you start planning out your offensive and defensive formations.

The two-player rules, for when you want to take your opponent on head-to-head.

The four-player rules, where things get a little more chaotic!
Zoo Ball is our new dexterity game by Duncan Molloy, where players try to clear a path to the opponent's goal with their blockers and shoot with their scorer. It will be released on the 24th of August.
Потребителски аватар
Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България
Мнения: 15383
Регистриран: 02 яну 2012, 19:25

Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 27 авг 2017, 00:00

Blog
Blog

1. Summer Sale - Osprey Games Highlights! - 2017-08-26 08:00:00
Our Summer Sale is almost at an end, so we thought we’d bring you some highlights to make sure you don’t miss out on any great bargains! Be sure to check the online catalogue for everything that is on sale!
Board Games
Shahrazad
1-2 Players | 10-20 Minutes | 30% Discount!
If you are looking for a great solo / cooperative game, Shahrazad may be just what you are after. With just 22 cards, you have to tell the best story you can to earn the favour of the king, but if you tell your tale in the wrong order life will get very difficult indeed!
Agamemnon
2 Players | 15-30 Minutes | 30% Discount!
Also included in our Summer Sale is Agamemnon, a two player strategy game where players take on the roles of ancient Greek gods during the Trojan War. Tactically deploy warriors where they are needed most to influence the final outcome of the battles famously detailed in Homer’s Iliad.
Let Them Eat Cake
3 - 6 Players | 45-80 Minutes | 30% Discount!
From Ancient Greece to the French Revolution, Let Them Eat Cake is a game of committees, coercion, and, well… cake! Elect your friends to position of power in the hope that they look on your patronage favourably, or denounce them as enemies of the revolution. Alliances and betrayal are all fair game as you try to amass as much cake as you can before the revolution collapses.
They Come Unseen
2-5 Players | 60-120 Minutes | 30% Discount
Designed by retired Royal Navy Officer and submarine commander Andy Benford, and developed deep beneath the waves, They Come Unseen is an asymmetrical strategy game of bluff and deception that uses two boards, one for action on the surface, seen by both sides, and one for movement underwater, seen only by the submarine commanders. The game also comes with specially designed control panels to help keep track of vital information such as fuel, ammunition and current cruising depth.


Wargames
Whether you are already a Frostgrave fan or are itching to start your adventures in the Frozen City, our Summer Sale can certainly help you out! The rulebook and printed book supplements are all available at 30% off, giving you a great opportunity to explore Felstad and claim some of the treasures that lie within the ruins.
Anyone interested in post-apocalyptic skirmish wargames is also in luck, with Scrappers available at the full 30% discount. Assemble your crew and send them out to search for Ancient technology and battle rival factions in savage skirmishes for salvage and survival in the ruins of the future.
Last but certainly not least, all currently published books from the OWG series can be picked up at a discount price, offering a wide range of great wargames such as Rogue Stars, Dragon Rampant, Broken Legions, and The Men Who Would Be Kings. Head on over to the OWG series page for the whole list!
The Summer Sale ends on the 31st of August, so take advantage while you can!
Потребителски аватар
Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България
Мнения: 15383
Регистриран: 02 яну 2012, 19:25

Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 28 авг 2017, 00:00

Blog
Blog

1. Osprey's Big Reveal: Air Campaign - 2017-08-27 11:05:00
MAA
ACE
NVG
COM
XPL
WPN
DUE
RAID
ACM
???
???
???
???
???
???
???




To navigate your way through the Big Reveal please use the links in the bar above.
We're flying through our Big Reveal now, and today's post is all about our newest series Air Campaign. See what's to come in 2018 below!
Battle of Britain 1940: The Luftwaffe’s ‘Eagle Attack’
In August 1940, the Luftwaffe began an operation to destroy or neutralize RAF Fighter Command, and enable Hitler to invade Britain that autumn. It was a new type of air warfare: the first ever offensive counter-air campaign against an integrated air defence system. Powerful, combat-proven and previously all-conquering, the German air force had the means to win the Battle of Britain. Yet it did not.
This book, the first in the series, explains Hermann Göring’s plans, the Luftwaffe’s capabilities in 1940, the RAF’s defences, the campaign’s objectives, and how the fierce aerial battles over south-east England were fought. Based on original documents, Doug Dildy’s new, analytical study of the Battle of Britain argues that it was the Luftwaffe’s own mistakes and failures that led to its defeat, and kept alive the Allies’ chance to ultimately defeat Nazi Germany.
Rabaul 1943–44: Reducing Japan’s great island fortress
In 1942, the massive Japanese naval base and airfield at Rabaul was a fortress standing in the Allies’ path to Tokyo. It was impossible to seize Rabaul, or starve the 100,000-strong garrison out. Instead the US began an innovative, hard-fought two-year air campaign to draw its teeth, and allow them to bypass the island completely.
The struggle decided more than the fate of Rabaul. If successful, the Allies would demonstrate a new form of warfare, where air power, with a judicious use of naval and land forces, would eliminate the need to occupy a ground objective in order to control it. As it turned out, the siege of Rabaul proved to be more just than a successful demonstration of air power – it provided the roadmap for the rest of World War II in the Pacific.
Rolling Thunder 1965–68: Vietnam’s most controversial air campaign
The bombing campaign that was meant to keep South Vietnam secure, Rolling Thunder became a byword for pointless, ineffective brutality, and was a key factor in America’s Vietnam defeat. Designed for and focused on the Cold War nuclear role, the US air forces had to hastily adapt to fighting a conventional war over Vietnam. Air power expert Dr Richard P. Hallion explains how the campaign was crippled by their inadequate training and equipment, a confused strategy, and rampant political interference from the White House.
But in its failures, Rolling Thunder was ironically one of the most influential air campaigns of the Cold War. It spurred a renaissance in US air power and the development of a superb new generation of US combat aircraft, and a renewed focus on pilot training and air-to-air combat. As the ultimate ‘how-not-to’ air campaign, Rolling Thunder was still closely studied by the planners of the devastatingly successful Gulf War air campaign – originally and tellingly codenamed ‘Instant Thunder’.
Malta 1940–42: The Axis’ air battle for Mediterranean supremacy
In 1940, the strategically vital island of Malta was Britain’s last toehold in the central Mediterranean, capable of wreaking havoc among Axis shipping. Launching an air campaign to knock Malta out of the war, first Italy and then Germany sought to force a surrender or reduce the defences enough to allow an invasion. Despite the fact that the RAF on Malta initially only had six Sea Gladiators, and that outdated Hurricanes made up most of the defending aircraft until 1942, the defenders managed to hold out until the last offensive campaign failed.
Researched from Italian and German sources, and explaining the strategic context for the German and Italian decision-making, this fascinating book explains where the Axis went wrong and why their attempt to neutralize Malta ultimately failed.
Operation Crossbow 1944: Hunting Hitler’s V-weapons
In mid-1943, Allied intelligence began to pick up the signs of unusual German construction in remote locations near the Channel coast. Several massive fortifications were beginning to take shape, and they appeared to be oriented towards London. Allied intelligence codenamed these sites as ‘Crossbow’ and began plans to attack them before they could bombard Britain’s capital city. These ‘Heavy Crossbow’ sites for the V-1 and V-2 missiles were supposed to be bomb-proof.
With London in the sights of these new weapons and the V-3 supergun, the effort to destroy them had top priority. Steve Zaloga explains how the RAF and USAAF attacked these hardened, well-defended sites, using Tallboy bombs, B-26 precision bombing, and even the American version of the Mistel programme – war-weary B-17s converted into explosive-packed, remote-controlled drones.
Operation Linebacker II 1972: The B-52s are sent to Hanoi
After the failed April 1972 invasion of South Vietnam, the North Vietnamese agreed to return to the Paris peace talks. But after the November 1972 American elections the North Vietnamese realised the newly elected anti-war Congress would stop funding the war in early January 1973. The North Vietnamese began stalling.
On December 18, 1972 Nixon, in an attempt to win the war quickly before Congress returned, ordered the Air Force to send the US’ ultimate conventional weapon, the B-52 bomber, against Hanoi for the first time. Hanoi was the best-defended target in Vietnam. The campaign – the ‘Christmas Bombings’ – became a battle between the B-52s and the North Vietnamese Soviet-supplied SA-2 SAM missile systems. Drawing on new interviews with North Vietnamese air defence veterans, Marshall L. Michel explains the capabilities of the SA-2, and the B-52 and its jammers and support aircraft, how Strategic Air Command’s initial tactics almost led to disaster, and how the two sides fought and changed tack over 11 nights of ferocious combat above Hanoi.
Sink the Tirpitz 1942–44: The RAF and Fleet Air Arm duel with Germany’s mighty battleship
Lurking secure in her Norwegian fjord, the battleship Tirpitz was a major threat to the Arctic Convoys, and tied up Royal Navy capital ships in home waters for years. Sinking her by air attack would be no easy task, however. Over two years, successive raids by heavy bombers from the RAF and the Fleet Air Arm’s Barracuda dive bombers sometimes damaged but failed to sink her.
It was clear that only heavy bombers dropping especially heavy bombs could do the job. In autumn 1944 the RAF launched the first of three large-scale attacks using Lancaster bombers armed with enormous Tallboy bombs. In the first, codenamed Operation Paravane, Tirpitz was badly damaged. In the third air attack, carried out in November 1944, the battleship was hit three times, and she capsized and sank. Her passing broke German naval power in Arctic waters, which in turn allowed the Allies to divert their naval resources to the Pacific, where the ocean-wide campaign was reaching its climax.
The air campaign against Tirpitz was one of vital strategic importance, and while small-scale compared to air operations over mainland Europe, it was one where a single bomb could dramatically influence the course of the war.
Operation Argument 1944: Taking on the Luftwaffe in ‘Big Week’
With the increasingly urgent need to eliminate the Jagdwaffe prior to ‘D-Day’, a concerted two-phase effort was launched, codenamed ‘Operation Argument’. This massive strategic bombing/aerial attrition initiative was history’s first-ever successful offensive counter-air (OCA) campaign. Targeting aircraft factories with hundreds of heavy bombers escorted by the new long-range P-51 Mustang escort fighter, the operation was designed to destroy aircraft production on the ground, and force the Luftwaffe into combat to defend these vital facilities – when it was intended that the new escort fighters would take their toll on the German interceptors.
During ‘Big Week’ and the ‘Battles over Berlin’, the USAAF’s Eighth AF won the battle for air superiority against the Jagdwaffe, forcing such attrition in the air and destruction on the ground that, on D-Day two months later, the Luftwaffe was able to mount only 172 sorties (compared with 13,700 flown by the Allies) over Northern France.

What do you think of these first 8 titles in our Air Campaign series? Let us know below!
Потребителски аватар
Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България
Мнения: 15383
Регистриран: 02 яну 2012, 19:25

Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 30 авг 2017, 00:00

Blog
Blog

1. Osprey's Big Reveal: Fortress - 2017-08-29 15:01:00
MAA
ACE
NVG
COM
XPL
WPN
DUE
RAID
ACM
FOR
???
???
???
???
???
???




To navigate your way through the Big Reveal please use the links in the bar above.
We only have one title joining our Fortress series in 2018, will it be making its way onto your shelves?
Defenses of Bermuda 1612–1995
Bermuda has played an important military role between America and Europe for almost 400 years due to its location in the Western North Atlantic some 635 miles off the Carolinas halfway between Halifax and Jamaica. Bermuda was a key naval base for the Royal Navy after the American Revolution in 1783, and ultimately as allies with the United States. Defending its coastline (64 miles) and ports has been vital, resulting in the construction of over ninety forts and batteries, even though its total land mass is only 20.6 square miles. This concentration of fortifications (4.4 forts per square mile), British possession, and its small size led to Bermuda gaining the informal title of the “Gibraltar of the West”. Today, the legacy of these defense works remains either as disused structures or parks scattered throughout Bermuda. The book provides an overview of their design, features, and operational history of Bermuda’s fortifications from the settlement of the islands in 1612 to the closure of the last defense base in 1995, as well as what has happened to these fortifications since that time, and which are the best ones to visit today through meticulous research and stunning commissioned color artwork.
Потребителски аватар
Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България
Мнения: 15383
Регистриран: 02 яну 2012, 19:25

Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 01 сеп 2017, 00:00

Blog
Blog

1. Sneak Peek at November's Artwork - 2017-08-31 15:40:09
As summer slowly comes to an end, it’s time to take a break from the Big Reveal and have a sneak peek into autumn, and some of the artwork featured in our November titles. This month we’ll be looking at some of our Weapon, New Vanguard and Combat titles, don’t forget to let us know which image has caught your attention!
WPN 59: The Cavalry Lance

Изображение

The scene above from The Cavalry Lance depicts the best-known cavalry charge in history at the Battle of Balaclava in the Crimea on 25 October 1854. The artwork here provides an insight into the sword versus the lance at Balaclava, as a British Private gallops into the Russian Cossacks and Uhlans to cut off the retreat of the Light Brigade.
NVG 252: M113 APC 1960–75

Изображение

This second image from M113 APC 1960–75 depicts The Battle of Binh Ba, or Operation Hammer, on 6 June 1969. The action came about as a single Centurion tank and a Centurion armoured recovery vehicle (ARV) passed the village of Binh Ba, when the Centurion came under small arms fire. The scene above depicts on the following battle that erupted afterwards.
CBT 29: Soviet Paratrooper vs Mujahideen Fighter

Изображение

This final plate from Soviet Paratrooper vs Mujahideen Fighter depicts Soviet paratroopers clinging to their hastily fortified positions around the sides of Hill 3234, as the air is filled with shrapnel and splinters of stone thrown up by the Mujahideen fire.
That’s your lot for this month, but do let us know in the comments which of these titles you’ll be adding to your shelves this November!
Потребителски аватар
Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България
Мнения: 15383
Регистриран: 02 яну 2012, 19:25

Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 02 сеп 2017, 00:00

Blog
Blog

1. September's Book Vote and August's Results - 2017-09-01 11:38:55
This month we're looking at our newest series, Air Campaign, which sees its first book published in 2018, but what would you like to see added to the series? September's book vote asks you just that, so have a read of the descriptions below and make your voice heard!




ACM: Austria 1915-18: Italy’s air campaign from the Adriatic to Vienna
ACM: The Ruhr 1943: The campaign against Germany’s industrial heartland
ACM: Operation Strangle 1943-44: Pioneering air interdiction in Italy
ACM: Japan 1945: Carrier raids against the Home Islands
ACM: Operation Black Buck 1982: Vulcans over Port Stanley





Austria 1915-18: Italy’s air campaign from the Adriatic to Vienna
In 1915 Italy entered the war with a collection of old French-made biplanes, and in the first duel with a Austrian biplane the Italian observer had to defend his aircraft with a rifle. But despite the reluctance of some senior officers the Italian air arm developed rapidly, with airships soon flying raids against Austrian provinces south of the Alps and across the Adriatic. When the famous Caproni heavy bombers joined the Italian air corps, Italy had one of the most modern bombers flying, and eventually fielded 15 squadrons of them. In the closing months of the war the Corpo Aeronautico Militare flew over Vienna dropping propaganda leaflets. Italy ended the war filled with pride in its aviation, and in the 1920s would be one of the most forward-looking aviation powers.
The Ruhr 1943: The campaign against Germany’s industrial heartland
During World War II, the Ruhr valley’s oil plants, steelworks and weapons factories were among the most important targets for Bomber Command – but almost among the best-defended. By 1943, navigation equipment and techniques had been developed, including the Pathfinder squadrons, the bomber stream, and electronics such as Oboe, that gave night bombers a fighting chance of hitting vital targets. Although the campaign is now most famous for the Dambuster raids, this book would focus on the conventional bombers’ fierce battle to get to and hit their targets, and the Germans’ deadly efforts to defend their industrial heartland.
Operation Strangle 1943-44: Pioneering air interdiction in Italy
With air superiority achieved over Italy in 1943, but with German troops dug in and blocking the road to Rome, Allied air commanders began an innovative campaign to cut German supply routes and try to force their withdrawal. Conditions seemed ideal, with a long supply chain, and rugged terrain channelling supplies along a limited number of routes. Heavy bombers would hit targets in northern Italy, while tactical aircraft flew missions further south. This book would explain how Strangle was conceived and fought, and how although it failed to cut the supply line, it unexpectedly reduced German troops’ mobility, making the Allies’ ground offensive, Operation Diadem, much easier.
Japan 1945: Carrier raids against the Home Islands
By 1945 the US Navy and British Pacific Fleet were confident enough to venture carrier-borne airstrikes against Japan’s Home Islands. Although it was still heavily defended by anti-aircraft guns and the shallow water did not allow the use of torpedoes, US carrier aircraft launched a determined attack on Kure, the naval base harbouring the last major Japanese warships, while Royal Navy carriers attacked Osaka. Partly revenge for Pearl Harbor, partly to allow Soviet naval operations to go undisturbed, and partly to destroy Japan’s potential bargaining chips, the raids sank three battleships, an aircraft carrier, several other warships and hundreds of aircraft, at the cost of 102 Allied aviators’ lives.
Operation Black Buck 1982: Vulcans over Port Stanley
Until the Gulf War, the longest-range bombing missions in history were a series of improvised raids by elderly RAF Vulcans, flown over several thousand miles of the desolate South Atlantic and supported by a complex relay of Victor aerial tankers, and meant to land just one or two unguided bombs on key parts of Port Stanley airfield. With navigation aids and ECM pods scavenged from other aircraft, and hastily refitted to allow conventional bombing and aerial refuelling, the first Black Buck managed to score a single hit in the middle of the Port Stanley runway, denying it to Argentine fast jets. Six follow-up raids, equally complex, used Shrike anti-radar missiles as well as bombs in missions against Argentinean air defences.
Make your vote by clicking here!
Now it's time to reveal the results of August's New Vanguard book vote, though it shouldn't be too much of a surprise to most of you who have been keeping up-to-date with it, as The Russian Navy of the Russo-Japanese War steered its way to a clear victory with a whopping 41.33% of the vote. Second place went to Torpedo Motorboats 1915-1919: Britain’s Coastal Motor Boats and Italy’s MAS, though that was quite behind with 19.99%. Thanks to everyone who cast their vote, and don't forget to have your say in this month's Book Vote.




NVG: Naval Shell Guns 1815-1866
12.65%


NVG: British Amphibious Assault Ships 1956-present
13.31%


NVG: Torpedo Motorboats 1915-1919
19.99%


NVG: The Russian Navy of the Russo-Japanese War
41.33%


NVG: Modern Stealth Warships
12.72%
2. Triple Sprue Challenge - Chris' Wizard - 2017-09-01 09:11:15
The wizard that I have cobbled together for the Triple Sprue Challenge is an Enchanter (named Dalben). I chose this partly because it steps away for the ‘classic’ image of a wizard, which I imagined my colleagues, and many others, would go for. The basic description from the Frostgrave Rulebook of an enchanter states that they are ‘craftsmen’ and ‘often the least wizardly looking’. My idea was to create something akin to a blacksmith in appearance. With this in mind, I used a mixture of the Frostgrave Soldiers and Barbarians for my Wizard. I felt that the cultist parts, while nice, didn’t really fit the good-natured, but somewhat grumpy older craftsman/enchanter I wanted for my character. It is also a good counterpoint to the more, dark arts orientated approach that many took in the office.

Изображение



Using the barbarian single-handed hammer and the one handed axe arm (with the axe clipped and replaced by the hammer) gave him the appearance of a blacksmith or some kind of tradesman. A bald, bearded barbarian head and a walking stick added to the image of an aged master. I am distinctly a fan of how the neck and head jut forward giving a hunched, aged appearance. The amount of pouches and added equipment reflected his tools/magical materials, these were the only Cultist parts that were used on this figure. I tried add a pocket to the front of his tabard, which when painted, I intend to be an apron similar to those worn by smiths. The overall pose is relatively static which I think befits a cautious, older individual and adds to the general idea of wisdom as displayed by classical wizards.
I feel that the figure is a little too limited in pose, style and distinctly un-wizardly (while partly intended, it seems overly so), and I didn’t quite capture what I wanted but that’s down to my lack of imagination when using the parts!
The Triple Sprue Challenge is a competition running throughout August and September where we challenge you to create a Wizard, Apprentice, and Captain using one sprue from each of the Frostgrave humanoid boxes – Soldiers, Cultists, and Barbarians. For more details on how to enter and the prizes up for grabs, head over to the contest blog!
Потребителски аватар
Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България
Мнения: 15383
Регистриран: 02 яну 2012, 19:25

Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 03 сеп 2017, 00:01

Blog
Blog

1. Osprey's Big Reveal: Elite - 2017-09-02 15:49:01
MAA
ACE
NVG
COM
XPL
WPN
DUE
RAID
ACM
FOR
ELI
???
???
???
???
???




To navigate your way through the Big Reveal please use the links in the bar above.
We may be nearing the end of our Big Reveal, but we still have some fantastic upcoming titles to share with you! Today's post looks at our Elite series, with six titles joining the already established list of over 200. You may notice some titles that were mistakenly added to last month's book vote. Sorry about that! Do remember to let us know, which you're looking forward to the most in the comments below!
Division Leclerc
‘General Leclerc' was the nom de guerre adopted by the Gaullist officer Philippe de Hautcloque, to protect his family in occupied France. He became France's foremost fighting commander, and his US-style armored division (the '2e DB') its most famous formation. Its origin was a small scratch force of mostly African troops organized and led by Leclerc in French Equatorial Africa, which seized French West Africa from the Vichy garrison in late 1940. In 1941–42 Leclerc's unit co-operated with Britain's Long Range Desert Group in the Sahara, crowning a series of raids on the Italians with the capture of Kouffra Oasis, and linking up with the Eighth Army after its victory at Second Alamein. Leclerc's growing brigade fought in Tunisia in spring 1943, and after the Allied victory there it was expanded and reorganized as a US Army-style armoured division, with American tanks and other armoured vehicles. Shipped to the UK, in spring 1944, it was assigned to Patton's US Third Army, landing in time for the Normandy breakout and being given the honour of liberating Paris in August 1944. Leclerc and the colonels who commanded his tactical groups distinguished themselves in later battles in Alsace/Lorraine, capturing Strasbourg in November 1944; the 2e DB ended the war at Berchtesgaden, Hitler's Bavarian lair.
The book will combine combat history, organization, uniforms and equipment.
Israeli Paratroopers 1954–2016
From the creation of the first volunteer paratroop unit shortly after the birth of Israel and of the Israeli Defence Force, this arm of service has been recognized as an elite. Their employment has varied from parachute drops and deployment by helicopter, to mechanized warfare mounted in halftracks to accompany tanks, to street fighting. They have also been the first choice for daring special missions, and it is mainly from their ranks that Israel's special forces units have been recruited. Their ethos has also been widespread throughout the IDF; a unique aspect of the Israeli military is the cross-posting of officers from the airborne, armoured and other units, to ensure that all unit commanders share their aggressive qualities and their thorough understanding of the capabilities of all arms. In this way the influence of the paratroop arm has been out of all proportion to its size.
Throughout this book, each historical chapter will cover the relevant developments in their role and organization, their achievements, but also their setbacks.
Roman Heavy Cavalry (1): Cataphractarii & Clibanarii, 1st Century BC–5th Century
From the army of Marc Antony in the 1st century BC onwards, Roman generals hired Oriental heavy armoured cavalry. After Trajan's victory over Sarmatian tribes in his Dacian War, in about 110 AD the first units of these cataphractarii or 'clibanarii' began to be absorbed into the Roman army proper (the latter being a slang term, from their supposed resemblance to iron stoves). Other tribes of the steppes (Iazyges, Roxolani, and Alani) continued to clash with Rome's allies and the Romans themselves on their north-east frontiers, culminating in the Marcomannic Wars of the 170s AD, in which they were defeated by Marcus Aurelius. Thereafter some 8,000 entered Roman service as hostage-soldiers, and 5,500 were posted to Britain. These troops, both from the northern steppes and the Persian frontiers, continued an ancient tradition of using heavy armour (occasionally, even for their horses) and long lances, and fighting in compact formation for maximum shock effect. They were quite distinct from conventional Roman light cavalry, and they became ever more important during the 3rd-century wars against Parthia (Persia), both to counter Parthian cavalry and (from the reign of Galienus in the 260s AD) to form a mobile strategic reserve. After the fall of the Western Empire this tradition would continue uninterrupted into the Byzantine period, which will be the subject of a second book.
The Etruscans 9th–2nd Centuries BC
Ancient Rome had deep roots in the 'Villanovan' culture that we call today the Etruscans. Their long-lived civilization can be traced to 900-750 BC in north-west Italy. They were a sea-faring people trading with and competing against Greek and Phoenician peoples, including the Carthaginians. They were also a great land-based power, especially in the 'Classical' period, where they expanded their power north into the Po Valley and south to Latium. In the 6th century BC an Etruscan dynasty ruled Rome, and their power extended southwards to the Amalfi coast. In 509 BC the Romans rose up to expel their kings, which began the long 'Etruscan twilight' when their power was squeezed by the Samnites and, most especially, the Romans.
Drawing on archaeological evidence including warrior tombs, paintings, sculptures, and fully illustrated throughout, this study examines one of the early rivals to Ancient Rome.
World War II US Marine Infantry Regiments
The United States Marine Corps came into its own in the Pacific Islands campaign against Japan in World War II. From Guadalcanal to Okinawa, US Marines formed the tip of the spear as Allied forces sought to push the Japanese back to their Home Islands.
This fascinating study tracks the deployments of the various Marine divisions throughout the war and explains their composition, but then goes deeper, to detail the individual regiments – the focus of the marines' identity and pride. It explains the organization of the Marine Infantry regiment and its equipment, and how they evolved during the war. The marine infantryman's evolving uniforms, field equipment and weapons are illustrated throughout using specially commissioned artwork and detailed descriptions to produce a fitting portrait of the US military’s elite fighting force in the Pacific.
Roman Standards & Standard-Bearers (1): 112 BC–AD 192
Roman unit standards played an important role, both ceremonially and on the battlefield. With the armies of the late Roman Republic and early Empire continually engaged on the frontiers, the soldiers selected for the dangerous honour of carrying them were figures of particular renown and splendour.
Standard-bearers wore special armour, with the heads and pelts of animals such as bears, wolves, or even lions draped over their helmets and shoulders. The standards themselves varied greatly, from the legion's Eagle and imperial portrait image to various cohort signa, flags (vexilla) and even dragon 'windsocks' (dracones) copied from barbarian enemies and allies.
This first volume of a two-part series by Roman army expert, Rafaele D’Amato examines these vital cogs in the Roman army machine that drove its soldiers to conquer the known world.

That's all the Elite titles we have to share with you this time, but keep checking the blog for our final remaining posts!
Потребителски аватар
Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България
Мнения: 15383
Регистриран: 02 яну 2012, 19:25

Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 06 сеп 2017, 00:00

Blog
Blog

1. Writing Operation Torch 1942 - 2017-09-05 15:28:49

Изображение
This month sees the publication of Operation Torch 1942, which follows one of the most complex amphibious invasions of the 20th century, the US-British invasion of French North Africa. Ahead of its publication, we welcome author Brian Lane Herder to the blog, who discusses how he chose this subject, and the writing of his first Osprey book.
Without warning, on November 8 1942, a powerful Allied invasion force descended on French North Africa, permanently altering the course of World War II. Operation Torch is for its size, importance, and Anglo-American origin – somehow one of the most overlooked campaigns of the war.
I am Operation Torch 1942 author Brian Lane Herder. Even in my youth I was generally well-versed in the United States' battlefield contribution to defeating Nazi Germany, but for years the campaign that started it all had long remained a mystery to me.
Embarrassed of my ignorance, several years ago I became obsessed with reading every Operation Torch book I could find. Two obvious standouts are the official US Army "green book" history, Seizing the Initiative in the West, and Rick Atkinson's 2003 Pulitzer Prize-winning, popular history An Army at Dawn. The bewildering political, geographic, and military complexity of Operation Torch ­­– roughly eleven major simultaneous air-sea landings across 1,000+ miles of coastline (Overlord had about seven across 30 miles of coastline) – inspired me to research, organize, and ultimately write my own Torch narrative, mostly so I could personally make sense of what actually happened. Fortunately, Osprey Publishing eventually commissioned me to write a Campaign entry on this truly fascinating episode.
There are so many mindlessly repeated myths about Operation Torch one wonders where to start. When I began my journey, I expected to mostly reconfirm the old story, hopefully present it more clearly than before, and have fun doing it. Instead the more I dug up old primary sources, the more I found myself getting angry with the scripted way "history" is so often presented. This was no glorified handover, this was a nasty fight. For example, an Allied battalion at Oran was effectively annihilated by French defenders in half an hour. I eventually compared total Allied Torch fatalities against the French with Overlord's first day of fatalities against the Germans – D-Day. Given the vast discrepancy in ink and plaudits spilled on the two landings, I found the numbers surprising.
Another myth is that Operation Torch ended when the French quit fighting on November 11 1942. In fact, the stated mission of Operation Torch was the total Allied conquest of Tunisia before winter. Torch therefore entailed major hostilities against the Germans and Italians and officially lasted until December 25. Osprey's Campaign entry follows this timeline accordingly.
Operation Torch additionally boasts the largest naval action in the Atlantic theater, the strangely obscure Naval Battle of Casablanca. This purely Franco-American showdown would easily rank amongst the top six or seven naval battles of the Pacific. As I explored Torch, I was surprised to fully perceive the US Navy had been involved in a genuine Atlantic slugfest.
Torch is easily the most politically-complex and politically-driven major operation of World War II. At least six major nationalities significantly shaped Torch as belligerents or potential belligerents, while the French alone can be divided into five or six major separate armed factions. Researching and relating Torch's endless political machinations and cloak-and-dagger intrigues was one of my favorite aspects of the project. While ample seamy exposition remains, ultimately Campaign is a battlefield series, and some truly fascinating stuff found its way to my chopping block. Unfortunately, much of Spain's significant influence on Operation Torch had to be excised, but that story is more appropriate for another study.
A personal pet peeve about the military history publishing market is how often I discover a new release about a favorite subject, get excited, order the book, and ultimately end up reading 450 verbose pages of what proves a total re-hash of prior works on the topic, most of them already sitting on my bookshelf. I do despise contrived revisionism when it's unjustified, but sifting through many different volumes and finding almost nothing new gets really frustrating. To me, a previously-published subject really only deserves a new entry if the author can strongly provide at least one of the following to the target audience:
1) Significant new content
2) New (but well-justified) interpretation of existing content
3) Novel presentation that explains existing content in a clearer way
I felt that I could fashion a new title around Operation Torch that could fulfill these requirements. The 96-page Campaign format initially strikes one as a limitation, but in practice it proves a major asset to both author and reader. Pick up just about any "scholarly" work and really parse the author's words and the chances are, much of the text does not actually impart the reader with new information. I suspect at least 80% of my writing time was spent not staring into a blank screen, but eviscerating old sentences and re-writing them with 2–3 fewer words, while keeping the same information. By the time I'd done this to every sentence in the book (many times), there was enough space left to add more actual information! A win for both the author and the reader.
I began my overall research studying and drawing from the many consistently excellent official/semi-official histories of the US and British militaries and governments. I then started drawing from the best secondary sources I could find – I didn’t obtain one of the very best until my first draft was nearly complete. I eventually started getting into the weeds with primary sources, such as official reports, statistics, and so on, in order to add hard numbers and details, to truly "get to the bottom" of military actions and commanders' motivations, and also often to confirm (or refute) questionable claims from secondary sources. I drew as much as possible from difficult-to-obtain French and Italian language official histories, as well as an American work that functions as an ersatz Luftwaffe history. Additionally, official reports and well-researched, well-annotated popular histories proved useful for colouring the narrative with fascinating anecdotes and quotations from Torch participants. I suspect the actual majority of my research hours was spent scouring obscure sources for tiny little details I had long wondered about, but had never actually seen included in a Torch narrative before. I think the effort was worth it, and I hope the reader enjoys the detail too.

Изображение
Torch troops hit the beaches behind a large American flag

I'm often frustrated by the way large campaigns are presented in many works. Most modern campaigns are combined arms battles (especially amphibious invasions). Therefore, in addition to the land combat, I strove to give the air, sea, and logistics aspects their proper due. Another personal frustration is a clear national bias by the author – although American, I sought to be as proportionate and even-handed as possible. My writing style tries to illuminate a top-down view of commanders and strategy, yet also include plenty of little anecdotes of the men and junior officers in the field. After all, they are the ones who ultimately fight wars, and they sacrifice accordingly. Additionally, I don't believe any human endeavor can truly be understood without sufficient context, so I like to throw in little relevant bits of local politics, history, culture, climate and terrain, so long as I can keep the combat narrative smooth.
Ultimately, a book is only as good as its ability to clearly and understandably impart its information to the reader. If I can't learn something from a book, then what good is it? If lots of maps, photos, illustrations, and tables help me learn something new, I want to see them in the books I read, and this is another of Osprey's strengths.
Every battle/campaign owns at least a few iconic images. Without them, no narrative truly feels complete. Who wants to read about Iwo Jima without Joe Rosenthal's flag-raising photo? However, a book with nothing but retread imagery feels like a rip-off. I therefore spent much time seeking fresh photos and illustrations, particularly in original colour, since the Campaign series supports that. I sought to include a mix of essential iconic Torch photos with photos and illustrations that were new. Many of the images in Operation Torch 1942 have only appeared in commercial print for a few times, and a few of them have never been seen before.
I was motivated to pick unusual and action-packed scenes for the three battlescene artworks. To my knowledge, none of these scenes have ever been illustrated before. It is here that I'm going to praise Operation Torch 1942 artist Darren Tan, whose interpretations of the selected scenes I find simply outstanding. I feel privileged to have been paired with him on this book.
I have surely enjoyed working on Osprey's Campaign Torch entry. Like most of you, I own scores of Osprey titles on my bookshelf. I am more than simply fortunate enough to add to the pantheon, I am also part of the Osprey fanbase myself. Like it did for me, I hope Operation Torch 1942 will help other Osprey fans better appreciate one of World War II's most complex, misunderstood, and overlooked campaigns.
Operation Torch 1942 is available to order now, and will be published on 21 September. To preorder, click here.
2. Dracula's America - Weird West Playlist - 2017-09-05 10:54:02
Whether you are looking to set the scene during a game of Dracula's America or something to put on in the background to inspire you as you paint some minis, our Dracula's America playlist has got you covered. It offers an eclectic mix of music that hopefully covers the varied factions that are battling it out in the Weird West.

Track list:
In the Defile - Jeff Herriott, S.Craig Zahler - Bone Tomahawk
In Hell I'll Be in Good Company - The Dead South
The Railroad - Goodnight, Texas
Dueling Banjos (from "Deliverance") - Keith Billik, Derek Smith
From Here to Hell - The Coffinshakers
Boots of Hell - Ghoultown
Lead me Home - Jamie N Commons
The Priest - Graveyard Train
Be Kind To A Man When He's Down - Fiddlin John Carson
The Battle Cry of Freedom - Dave Bourne Saloon Piano
If you have any suggestions for tracks that could be added let us know in the comments section below!
Потребителски аватар
Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България
Мнения: 15383
Регистриран: 02 яну 2012, 19:25

Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 07 сеп 2017, 00:00

Blog
Blog

1. Osprey's Big Reveal: Campaign - 2017-09-06 15:18:28
MAA
ACE
NVG
COM
XPL
WPN
DUE
RAID
ACM
FOR
ELI
CAM
???
???
???
???




To navigate your way through the Big Reveal please use the links in the bar above.
We may be nearing the end of this year's Big Reveal, but we still have some fantastic titles to showcase, and today is no exception!
Have a read of the 13 descriptions below and let us know which of these Campaign books you'll be adding to your to-read lists for 2018.
Operation Market-Garden 1944 (3)
Field Marshal Montgomery's plan to get Second British Army behind the fortifications of the German Siegfried Line in 1944 led to the hugely ambitions Operation Market-Garden. Part of this plan called for a rapid advance from Belgium through Holland up to and across the lower Rhine by the British XXX Corps along a single road already dominated by airborne troops.
Their objective along this road was the bridge at Arnhem, the target of British and Polish airborne troops. Once XXX Corps had reached this bridge it would then make for the German industrial area of the Ruhr. The operation was bold in outlook but risky in concept.
Operation Market-Garden 1944 (3) completes Osprey’s trilogy on the operation, examining the attack which, if successful, could have shortened the war in the west considerably. Yet it turned out to be a bridge too far.
The Kuban 1943
In the summer of 1942, the German Army invaded the Caucasus in order to overrun the critical Soviet oil production facilities at Maikop, Grozny and Baku. However, the Red Army stopped the Germans short of their objectives and then launched a devastating winter counteroffensive that encircled them at Stalingrad. Hitler grudgingly ordered an evacuation from the Caucasus, but ordered 17. Armee to fortify the Kuban bridgehead and hold it at all costs in order to leave open the possibility of future offensives. On the other side, the Soviet Stavka ordered the North Caucasus Front and the Black Sea Fleet to eliminate the Kuban bridgehead as soon as possible. The stage was set for a contest between an immovable object and an unstoppable force.
Imphal 1944
In March 1944, the Japanese Fifteenth Army launched an offensive into India from Burma. Named "U Go", its main objective was the capture of the town of Imphal, which provided the easiest route between India and Burma. Whoever controlled it, controlled access between the two countries. Facing off against the Japanese was the British Fourteenth Army and its Imphal-based 4 Corps. For the next four months, over 200,000 men clashed in the hills and valley of Manipur in what has since been described as one of the greatest battles of World War II.
Although the exact numbers are unknown, it is estimated that some 30,000 Japanese soldiers died and 23,000 became casualties at the twin battles of Imphal and Kohima, and on the long gruelling retreat to Burma that followed. It remains the largest defeat on land ever for the Japanese Army.
Brittany 1944
One of the prime objectives for the Allies following the D-Day landings was the capture of sufficient ports to supply their armies. The original Overlord plans assumed that ports along the Breton coast would be essential to expansion of the Normandy beach-head. These included the major ports at Brest and on Quiberon Bay.
The newly arrived Third US Army under Lt. Gen. George S. Patton was delegated to take on the Brittany mission. In one of the most rapid mechanized advances of the war, Third Army had the ports of Avranches and Quiberon encircled by the second week of August 1944.
But changing priorities meant that most of Patton’s men were redeployed, leaving only a single corps to take the Breton port cities. The fight would drag into 1945, long after German field armies had been driven from France. Brittany 1944 is the fascinating story of the siege of Germany’s last bastions on the French Atlantic coast.
Tenochtitlan 1519–21
In 1519, the conquistador Hernán Cortés landed on the mainland of the Americas. His quest to serve God, win gold, and achieve glory drove him into the heartland of what is now Mexico, where no European had ever set foot before. He marched towards to the majestic city of Tenochtitlan, floating like a jewel in the midst of Lake Texcoco.
This encounter brought together cultures that had hitherto evolved in complete isolation from each other – Catholic Spain and the Aztec Empire. What ensued was the swift escalation from a clash of civilizations to a war of the worlds. At the conclusion of the conquistador campaign of 1519–21, Tenochtitlan lay in ruins, the last Aztec Emperor was in chains, and Spanish authority over the native peoples had been definitively asserted.
The Caudine Forks 321 BC
In her long history, Rome suffered many defeats, but none was as humiliating as the Caudine Forks in 321 BC. Rome had been at war with the Samnite League since 328 BC. The rising powers vied for supremacy in central and southern Italy, and their leaders were contemplating the conquest of all Italy. The new Roman consuls of 321 BC were the ambitious, but militarily inexperienced, Veturius Calvinus and Postumius Albinus. They were determined to inflict a massive blow on the Samnites but their troops were instead surprised, encircled and destroyed. The survivors were forced to retreat under the yoke in a humiliation worse than death.
Blanc Mont Ridge 1918
The dominating Blanc Mont Ridge complex in the Champagne region of France was home to some of the most complex German defences on the Western Front. Its heights offered artillery observation that made even approaching the ridge virtually suicidal.
Pessimistic about the ability of depleted and demoralized French units to capture the position, Général Henri Gouraud was granted the use of two American divisions: the veteran 2nd “Indianhead” Division, including the 4th (Marine) Brigade, and the untested 36th “Arrowhead” Division of the Texas and Oklahoma National Guard.
Blank Mont Ridge 1918 looks at the Allied offensive, and shows how despite the heavy losses it sustained to both manpower and supporting armour, they eventually forced the Germans to abandon most of the region in one of the largest withdrawals of the war.
Campaldino 1289
Campaldino is one of the important battles between the Guelphs and Ghibellines - the major political factions in the city states of central and northern Italy. It heralded the rise of Florence to a dominant position over the area of Tuscany and was one of the last occasions when the Italian city militias contested a battle, with the 14th century seeing the rise of the condottiere in Italy's Wars.
However, with Campaldino, its importance as an event and its consequences are dwarfed in the popular imagination by its poetic description in one of the greatest works of world literature, Dante Alighieri’s Divine Comedy. Campaldino and the horrors of hand-to-hand fighting shaped Dante in no uncertain ways, bringing the somewhat rarified poet face-to-face with the solid brutality of combat. What the part-time Florentine soldier saw would seep into a masterpiece of the ages, making the Divine Comedy not just a unique poetic composition, but also a too often disregarded historical document on the reality of medieval warfare.
The Solomons 1943–44
Victory at Guadalcanal for the Allies in February 1943 left them a vital foothold in the Solomon Islands chain, and was the first step in an attempt to isolate and capture the key Japanese base of Rabaul on New Britain. In order to do this they had to advance up the island chain in a combined air, naval, and ground campaign. On the other hand, the Japanese were determined to shore up their defences on the Solomons, which was a vital part of their southern front, and would bitterly contest every inch of the Allied advance. The scene was set for one of the bloodiest campaigns of the Pacific War.
This is the compelling story of the struggle for the Solomons, a key part of the Allied advance towards Japan which saw tens of thousands of casualties and so many ships lost that part of the ocean became known as "Ironbottom Sound."
Imjin River 1951
After China’s November 1950 intervention in the Korean War and the subsequent battle of the Chosin Reservoir, UN forces were beaten back to the southern third of the Korean peninsula. It was not until January 1951 that the UN Command recovered and launched a counterattack of its own. By March 1951, UN troops had recaptured Seoul and were again moving north. In an attempt to regain the initiative, Chinese commanders planned a massive offensive the primary target of which was the US 3rd Infantry Division, which included the British 29th Brigade and which held a front line spread out along the Imjin River.
From 22 to 25 April 1951, 40,000 Chinese troops smashed headlong into 29th Brigade, and only a desperate last-ditch last stand by the men of the Gloucestershire Regiment enabled the 29th Brigade to withdraw. The Glosters’ efforts—as well as those of other 3rd Division elements—had slowed the Chinese advance long enough for UN forces to regroup. The stand on the Imjin River had blunted the Chinese offensive in one of the major set-pieces actions of the Korean War.
Peckuwe 1780
The Peckuwe campaign has its origins in British Captain Henry Bird’s 1780 invasion of Kentucky during the American Revolutionary War. Bird’s dramatic invasion with 700 Canadians and Indians, and a 6lb gun, ultimately failed, but he did succeed in capturing two settlers’ stations, and about a tenth of Kentucky’s American population.
American general George Rogers Clark’s Peckuwe campaign was an equally dramatic response. He closed the trails from Kentucky to keep discouraged settlers from fleeing, and then ordered four out of five of the men and boys able to use firearms to muster for the campaign. Its goal was to destroy Chalawgatha and Peckuwe, two villages that served as the principal bases for Indian raids into Kentucky. With the lightning speed that characterized his operations, Clark somehow managed to assemble 1,000 men and boys, two guns and the necessary munitions, food and other supplies in about four weeks, from wilderness settlements connected only by streams and horse trails, and scattered over nearly 10,000 square miles. He then advanced 85 miles to the battlefield in another week, crossing the Ohio and cutting a transport road as he went.
Clark’s Kentuckians, and about 500 Indians led by Black Hoof, Buckongahelas and Girty, then met at Peckuwe in the largest western battle of the Revolutionary War.
Mutina 43 BC
In the confusion following the assassination of Julius Caesar in 44 BC, civil war broke out between Mark Antony, who saw himself as a legitimate successor to Julius Caesar, and the forces of the Senate allied with Octavian, Caesar’s adopted son and heir. Caesars’s old legions found their loyalties divided between the two Caesarian leaders and fighting on opposite sides in the struggle.
Mutina 43 BC covers the events of this civil war in 43 BC when Antony, having confined the consul Decimus Brutus around Mutina, found himself sandwiched between the three legions of Decimus Brutus behind the walls of Mutina, and the relieving armies of the consuls and Octavian. Antony decided to launch an attack on one army before the two consuls could join forces.
On 14 April, with his back to Forum Gallorum Antony fell upon the consular forces. While the veterans of both sides fought splendidly, Antony himself led the centre and routed his enemies. Unfortunately Antonius had no time to consolidate the victory or regroup his army. On 21 April Antony was heavily defeated in a fearful battle below the walls of Mutina, nothing more subtle than a slogging match involving Caesar’s hardened veterans on each side. Octavian took command of the consular forces, refusing to assist Decimus Brutus, and marched on Rome once more. Antony, defeated but not routed, was forced to abandon the siege of Mutina and cross the Alps into Gallia Transalpina.
Tsushima 1905
As the 20th century opened Great Britain, France, and Russia divided the world, but Japan was catching up. It had established a European-style constitution, eliminated feudalism, and abolished the samurai class. Its army was trained by Germany, widely considered the worlds’ finest, and its navy was taught by the Britain’s Royal Navy, then at the zenith of its power. Japan bought modern warships from Europe and the United States and Japan’s professional navy decisively defeated China’s in a nine-month war spanning 1894 and 1895. Japan wanted to further emulate its European mentors and establish a protectorate over Korea, freed from China by the war. Japanese efforts were blocked by Imperial Russia and Japan resolved on war. It would prove the first major war of the 20th century – and the first modern war, presaging World War I. It was, despite major land battles, in ways primarily a naval war. Without control of the seas Japan could not reach its objectives, one of which was the theatre’s main Russian naval base.
The battle of Tsushima was a battle of firsts and lasts. It was the first major fleet action between steel warships, and the last battle to see the surrender of an enemy battle line at sea. It was the most decisive naval battle since Trafalgar and the largest naval battle since Trafalgar.

That's all for Campaign in 2018! Which will be charging onto your shelves?
2. Triple Sprue Challenge - The Entries so far! - 2017-09-06 08:29:27
We're just over half way through the Triple Sprue Challenge and have had some great entries in so far, with people using the Frostgrave Soldier, Cultist, and Barbarian sprues in ways we would never have thought of. Here are all the entries we've had so far, some great inspiration for putting together your warbands or creating your entries for the competition!

Изображение


Some heroic, some sinister, and some downright weird (were looking at you Lanse...)
There's still just under a month to get your entries for the Triple Sprue Challenge in, with the winners and runners up winning some great Frostgrave: Ghost Archipelago loot!
The Triple Sprue Challenge is a competition running throughout August and September where we challenge you to create a Wizard, Apprentice, and Captain using one sprue from each of the Frostgrave humanoid boxes – Soldiers, Cultists, and Barbarians. For more details on how to enter and the prizes up for grabs, head over to the contest blog!
Потребителски аватар
Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България
Мнения: 15383
Регистриран: 02 яну 2012, 19:25

Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 09 сеп 2017, 00:00

Blog
Blog

1. Osprey's Big Reveal: Combat - 2017-09-08 14:25:00
MAA
ACE
NVG
COM
XPL
WPN
DUE
RAID
ACM
FOR
ELI
CAM
CBT
???
???
???




To navigate your way through the Big Reveal please use the links in the bar above.
Today we're charging into battle with one of our final reveals. Take a look at the 8 Combat titles below and let us know, as always, which has caught your attention.
Chinese Soldier vs Japanese Soldier: China 1937–38
In July 1937, the Marco Polo Bridge Incident sparked a bloody conflict between Chinese and Japanese forces that would rage across China and beyond for more than eight years. The outbreak was the culmination of decades of an aggressive Japanese foreign policy, including the creation of a puppet state in Manchuria; tensions between the Chinese and the Japanese had flared into violence several times in the 1930s before the onset of total war.
This study investigates the origins, training, doctrine and armament of the Chinese and Japanese forces who fought in the opening stages of the Second Sino-Japanese War. It examines three key battles during this period: the Marco Polo Bridge Incident (July 1937); the battle of Tai'erzhuang (March–April 1938), the first major Chinese victory of the war, which boosted Chinese morale and destroyed the myth of Japanese invincibility; and the bloody battle of Wanjialing (September–October 1938).
French Foreign Légionnaire vs Viet Minh Insurgent: North Vietnam 1948–52
The French Indochina War (1946–54) was the largest of the first generation of post-World War II wars of decolonization as Vietminh insurgents sought to topple their French colonial masters. It was also unique in that the insurgency evolved from low-level guerrilla activity to having a large conventional army which finally defeated a large European-led expeditionary force supported by artillery, armour and airpower. The war’s progress was almost entirely dictated by the extreme terrain, and by the Chinese support enjoyed by the Vietnamese insurgents. The actions explored in this study cover three contrasting phases of the war in Tonkin during 1948–52, setting both sides on the path that would lead to the conflict’s climactic encounter at Dien Bien Phu in 1954.
Gebirgsjäger vs Soviet Sailor: Arctic Circle 1942–44
In 1941–44, Nazi Germany’s Gebirgsjäger - elite mountain troops - clashed repeatedly with land-based units of the Soviet Navy during the mighty struggle on World War II’s Eastern Front. Formed into naval infantry and naval rifle brigades, some 350,000 of Stalin’s sailors would serve the Motherland on land, playing a key role in the defence of Moscow, Leningrad, and Sevastopol. The Gebirgsjäger, many among them veterans of victories in Norway and then Crete, would find their specialist skills to be at a premium in the harsh terrain and bitter weather encountered at the northern end of the front line. Operating many hundreds of miles north of Moscow, the two sides endured savage conditions as they fought one another inside the Arctic Circle.This is the absorbing story of the men who fought and died in the struggle for the Soviet Union’s northern flank at the height of World War II.
Greek Hoplite vs Persian Warrior: 499–479 BC
The Greco-Persian Wars (499–449 BCE) convulsed Greece, Asia Minor and the Near East for half a century. Through a series of bloody invasions and pitched battles, the mighty Persian Empire pitted itself against the smaller armies of the Greeks, strengthened through strategic alliances. This epic conflict also brought together two different styles of warfare: the Greek hoplite phalanx and the combined spear and projectile weapon-armed Persian infantry.
Analysing the battles of Marathon, Thermopylae and Plataea from the eyes of a soldier, this study explores the experience of front-line combat during the first two decades of the Greco-Persian Wars. This is the enthralling story of the fighting men of Greece and Persia and the tactics and technologies they employed.
Hitlerjugend Soldier vs Canadian Soldier: Normandy 1944
Canadian and Waffen-SS troops of 12. SS-Panzer-Division Hitlerjugend faced one another in a series of bloody battles following the D-Day landings of June 1944. The Canadian units fought in a number of distinguished regiments, while the Hitlerjugend Division were drawn from the ranks of the Hitler Youth organizations. Veteran officers and NCOs were joined by inexperienced teenagers, and clashed with the Canadians repeatedly, notably at Authie, Bretteville and Soumont-Saint-Quentin. The struggle quickly took on an especially bitter nature, fuelled by the massacre of Canadian prisoners by Hitlerjugend personnel.
Hitlerjugend Soldier vs Canadian Soldier investigates the origins, ethos, training, fighting techniques and weapons of both sides during the epic struggle for Normandy.
Roman Legionary vs Carthaginian Warrior: Second Punic War 217–206 BC
The peace that followed the First Punic War was shallow and fractious, with the resumption of hostilities in 218 BC sparked by Carthaginian expansion in Iberia seeing Rome suffer some of the worst defeats in her entire history. The Carthaginian army was a composite affair primarily made up of a number of levies from Africa and around the Mediterranean augmented by mercenaries and allies, and these troops crushed the Roman heavy infantry maniples in a series of battles across Southern Europe. Improvements made to their military, however, would see Roman revenge visited on Hannibal in full measure by Scipio, who would beat him at his own game and bring Roman legions to the gates of Carthage itself. Roman Legionary vs Carthaginian Warrior looks at the epic battles at Lake Trasimene (217 BC), Cannae (216 BC), and Ilipa (206 BC).
US Airborne Soldier vs German Soldier: Sicily, Normandy, and Operation Market Garden, 1943–44
The US Airborne force fielded some of the toughest, best-trained and most resourceful troops of World War II – all necessary qualities in a force that was lightly armed and which would in most operational circumstances be surrounded from the moment it landed on the battlefield. The German Wehrmacht grew to rely on a series of defensive measures to combat the airborne threat, including fortifications, localized reserves, and special training to help intercept and disrupt airborne troops both in the air and on the ground. Despite such methods it was cool-headed command and control that would prove to be the real key to blunting the Airborne’s edge.
This book examines the development of the American airborne forces that spearheaded the Allied effort in Sicily, Normandy and Operation Market Garden, and the German countermeasures that evolved in response to the threat of Allied airborne landings.
US Marine vs German Soldier: Belleau Wood 1918
After the US declaration of war on Germany, hundreds of thousands of American troops flooded into France and were thrust into the front line. Among them was the US Marine Corps’ 4th Marine Brigade whose first major action was the battle of Belleau Wood in June 1918, fighting elements of Germany’s 10th, 28th, and 237th Infantry divisions. Volunteers to a man, the newly arrived Marines faced experienced but war-weary German conscripts whose doctrine had been honed by nearly four years of conflict on the Western Front. During the fighting, the Germans are alleged to have given the nickname “Devil Dogs” to the Marines, and Belleau Wood has become enshrined in the Corps’ heritage.
US Marine vs German Soldier investigates three different actions that shaped the course of the bitter battle for Belleau Wood, revealing the interplay of doctrine, tactics, technology, leadership, and human endeavour on the brutal battlefields of World War I.
2. 5 Things We’ve Learned From Playing The Lost Expedition - 2017-09-07 18:24:58
The Lost Expedition regularly makes an appearance at lunchtimes here at Osprey HQ, with groups of us clustering around a table and trying to navigate our way through the jungle to the Lost City of El Dorado. With the cards laid out in front of us, the decisions that we make each game have taught us a lot. Our conclusion – we probably shouldn’t go on any real expeditions together!

Изображение

Never leave your campsite unattended
When on an expedition, it seems that the concept of ‘ownership’ goes out of the window. If we stumble upon an abandoned camp, you’d better believe we're going to rummage through any bags we find and make off with whatever we can. How long the camp has been abandoned really doesn’t matter – it could be 5 months, it could be 5 minutes. We don’t care, we just want your stuff!

Изображение

If it gets us somewhere faster, we’re happy to let Piranhas nibble on our toes
We’re also OK with walking along rickety rope bridges, fording mighty rivers, taking on local tribes, and navigating steep or ancient pathways. Basically, it seems that no matter what the obstacle is we will try to plough through, even if it costs us a toe/hand/leg/our fellow explorers.

Изображение

Hookworms have no redeeming qualities
We kinda knew this already, but The Lost Expedition has reinforced it. Hookworms are gross. It’s good to know that they can be burned away with gunpowder, but there is absolutely nothing to like about them and the grossness of the card reflects that!

Изображение

We are incredibly bloodthirsty
Whether it be our willingness to shoot the nearest thing that moves in the hope of getting food or the blasé manner in which some of us are willing to sacrifice our explorers, what is undoubtedly true is that as we venture through the Amazonian rainforest we leave a trail of destruction behind us. I guess the idea that you should take only photographs and leave only footprints is a little lost on us.

Изображение

Real-life explorers are pretty bad-ass!
All jokes aside, The Lost Expedition gives us a taste of the excitement of exploration without facing any of the dangers ourselves. The real-life explorers who go out and grapple with dangerous beasts, traverse perilous paths, battle with the elements, and forage for the food to survive must be some tough cookies!
Have you learned anything about yourself from The Lost Expedition, or any other game? Let us know!
Заключена

Върни се в “Новости от производителите на модели / Manufacturers' news”