Новини - литература и периодика - Архив 2016г.

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Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България
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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 20 авг 2016, 00:01

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1. Osprey's Big Reveal: Combat - 2016-08-19 07:13:00
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In today's instalment of the Big Reveal we are charging into the thick of battle, with eight new Combat titles scheduled for release in 2017.
Panzergrenadier vs US Armored Infantryman
During World War II, the two pre-eminent mechanized infantry forces of the conflict, the German Panzergrenadier arm and the US Army’s armoured infantrymen, clashed in France and Belgium after the Normandy landings. These engagements went on to profoundly influence the use of mechanized infantry in the post-war world. Drawing upon a variety of sources, this book focuses on three key encounters between July and December 1944 including during Operation Cobra and the Battle of the Bulge, and examines the origins, equipment, doctrine and combat record of both forces.

New Zealand Infantryman vs German Motorcycle Soldier
In April 1941, as Churchill strove to counter the German threat to the Balkans, New Zealand troops were hastily committed to combat in the wake of the German invasion of Greece where they would face off against the German Kradschützen – motorcycle troops. Examining three major encounters in detail with the help of maps and contemporary photographs, this lively study shows how the New Zealanders used all their courage and ingenuity to counter the mobile and well-trained motorcycle forces opposing them in the mountains and plains of Greece and Crete.
Longbowman vs Crossbowman
For centuries, the crossbow had dominated the battlefields of continental Europe, with mercenaries from Genoa and Brabant in particular filling the ranks of the French army, yet on the outbreak of the Hundred Years' War they came up against a formidable foe. To master the English longbow was a labour of years, requiring far greater skill to use than the crossbow, but it was much more flexible and formidable, striking fear into French men-at-arms and cavalry.

Canadian Corps Soldier vs Royal Bavarian Soldier
In 1917 the soldiers of the Canadian Corps would prove themselves the equal of any fighting on the Western Front, while on the other side of the wire, the men of the Royal Bavarian Army won a distinguished reputation in combat. Employing the latest weapons and pioneering tactics, these two forces would clash in three notable encounters: the Canadian storming of Vimy Ridge, the back-and-forth engagement at Fresnoy and at the sodden, bloody battle of Passchendaele.

Boer Guerrilla vs British Mounted Soldier
Waged across an inhospitable terrain which varied from open African savannah to broken mountain country and arid semi-desert, the Anglo-Boer wars of 1880–81 and 1899–1902 pitted the British Army and its allies against the Boers’ commandos.

The nature of warfare across these campaigns was shaped by the realities of the terrain and by Boer fighting techniques. Independent and individualistic, the Boers were not professional soldiers but a civilian militia who were bound by the terms of the ‘Commando system’ to come together to protect their community against an outside threat. By contrast the British Army was a full-time professional body with an established military ethos, but its over-dependence on conventional infantry tactics led to a string of Boer victories.

Viking Warrior vs Anglo-Saxon Warrior
In the two centuries before the Norman invasion of England, Anglo-Saxon and Viking forces clashed repeatedly in bloody battles across the country. Repeated Viking victories in the 9th century led to their settlement in the north of the country, but the tide of war ebbed and flowed until the final Anglo-Saxon victory before the Norman Conquest. Using stunning artwork, this book examines in detail three battles between the two deadly foes: Ashdown in 871 which involved the future Alfred the Great; Maldon in 991 where an Anglo-Saxon army sought to prevent a renewed Viking invasion; and Stamford Bridge in 1066 which forced King Harold Godwinson to abandon his preparations to repel the expected Norman invasion to fight off Harald Hard-Counsel of Norway.

German Soldier vs Soviet Soldier
By the end of the first week of November 1942, the German Sixth Army held about 90 per cent of the city of Stalingrad. Yet the Soviets stubbornly held on to the remaining parts of the city, and German casualties were reaching catastrophic levels. In an attempt to break the deadlock, on 2 November Hitler decided to send additional German pioneer battalions to act as an urban warfare spearhead. These combat engineers were skilled in all aspects of city fighting, especially in the use of demolitions and small arms to overcome defended positions and in the destruction of armoured vehicles. Facing them were Soviet troops hardened by months of fighting experience. They had perfected the use of urban camouflage, concealed and interlocking firing positions, the application of submachine guns and grenades at close quarters, and sniper support.
Soviet Paratrooper vs Mujahideen Fighter
In 1979 the Soviet Union moved from military ‘help’ to active intervention in its neighbour Afghanistan, with Soviet paratroopers seizing Kabul at the end of December 1979 and motor-rifle divisions crossing the border to reinforce them. Four-fifths of the Afghan National Army deserted in the first year of the war, which, compounded with the spread and intensification of the rebellion throughout the provinces – led by the Mujahideen, formidable guerrilla fighters – forced the Soviets to intensify their involvement. The Mujahideen were never a singular force, though they shared tactics and behaviours that spoke to a common cultural and military experience. They understood the value of surprise, fighting on one’s own terms and the intelligent use of terrain, behaving in a manner that was oftentimes not so different from that of their ancestors fighting the British over a century before.
Eight new releases battling it out for a place on your bookshelf. Which ones will you pick up? Let us know in the comments section below.
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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 23 авг 2016, 00:01

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1. Osprey's Big Reveal: Aircraft of the Aces - 2016-08-22 07:00:00
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Next up in Osprey's Big Reveal we have the Aircraft of the Aces series, which will be seeing four additional titles in 2017.
Jagdgeschwader 53 ‘Pik-As’ Bf 109 Aces of 1940
Boasting pilots who had been blooded in the Spanish Civil War, Jagdgeschwader 53 (JG 53) ‘Pik As’ or ‘Ace of Spades’ achieved great success in the skies over France and Britain in 1940. Among the leading aces were Werner Mölders, Rolf Pingel and Hans Karl Mayer, all of whom received the Knight’s Cross for their successes in aerial combat. The successes of its pilots resulted in JG 53 being credited with 258 victories following the Battle of Britain for the loss of 51 pilots killed or captured. This study follows the aces of JG 53 into battle, telling the stories of their victories, losses, and ultimate fate.
MiG-21 Aces of the Vietnam War
Having honed their skills on the subsonic MiG-17, pilots of the VPAF received their first examples of the legendary MiG-21 supersonic fighter in 1966. Soon thrown into combat over North Vietnam, the guided-missile equipped MiG-21 proved a deadly opponent for the USAF, US Navy and US Marine Corps crews striking at targets deep into communist territory. Although the communist pilots initially struggled to come to terms with the fighter’s air-search radar and weapons systems, the ceaseless cycle of combat operations quickly honed their skills. Indeed, by the time the last US aircraft (a B-52) was claimed by the VPAF on 28 December 1972, no fewer than 13 pilots had become aces flying the MiG-21, with five more claiming four victories. The best fighter then available to the VPAF, more than 200 MiG-21s (of various sub-types) were supplied to the North Vietnamese.
Jagdgeschwader 1 ‘Oesau’ Aces 1939-45
Formed shortly after the outbreak of World War 2, and equipped with Messerschmitt Bf 109Es, Jagdgeschwader 1 was initally tasked to defend the regional North Sea and Baltic coastal areas and the Reich's main port cities and naval bases. The greatest task for JG 1 though came after 1942 in its defence of the Reich against the US Eighth Air Force’s B-17s and B-24s, bearing the brunt of defence against increasingly regular, larger and deep penetration USAAF daylight bomber raids with fighter escort. Levels of attrition subsequently grew, but so did experience among the leading aces who were often the subject of propaganda films and literature.
Allied Jet Killers of World War 2
Allied fighter pilots began encountering German jets – principally the outstanding Me 262 fighter – from the autumn of 1944. Stunned by the aircraft’s speed and rate of climb, it took USAAF and RAF units time to work out how to combat this deadly threat as the Luftwaffe targeted the medium and heavy bombers attacking targets across the Reich. It was soon discovered the best way to down a jet was to attack it when it was preparing to land after its mission has been completed. Occasionally, a pilot would get lucky and hit a jet whilst it was attacking bombers, knocking out an engine that then slowed the fighter enough for it to be caught up and shot down. A number of high-scoring aces from the Eighth Air Force (Drew, Glover, Meyer, Norley and Yeager, to name but a few) succeeded in claiming Me 262s, Me 163 and Ar 234s during the final months of the campaign, as did RAF aces like Tony Gaze and ‘Foob’ Fairbanks flying Spitfires and Tempests. The exploits of both famous and little-known pilots will be chronicled in this volume, detailing how they pushed their aircraft to the limits of their performance in order to down the Luftwaffe's 'wonder weapons'.
Which of these will you be adding to your collection? Let us know in the comments section below!
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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 24 авг 2016, 00:01

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1. Sneak Peek at November Artwork - 2016-08-23 07:51:15
We have taken a little break from our Big Reveal to showcase three pieces of fantastic artwork that will feature in our November 2016 releases. Take a look and let us know what you think in the comments section below.
Weapon 51: The Gladius by M.C. Bishop
Artwork by Peter Dennis

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This engagement, painted by Peter Dennis, is from the first Dacian War of AD 101-02. Legionaries, armed with their gladii, are in bloody hand-to-hand combat with Dacian warriors The poses of the Romans are based on their depiction on the Tropaeum Traiani at Adamclisi, a monument that was probably produced by the army.
New Vanguard 240: M50 Ontos and M56 Scorpion 1956-70 by Kenneth W. Estes
Artwork by Johnny Shumate

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This plate, coming from Johnny Shumate, shows the M50A1 Ontos at the Battle of Hue, 1968. The vehicle in this picture is Vehicle A33, one of ten Ontos taking part in the battle. It was found and retored in the last ten years and is now on exhibit at the Marine Corps Mechanized Museum at Camp Pendleton.
Campaign 302: The Thames 1813 by John F Winkler
Artwork by Peter Dennis

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The final piece of artwork for this month's reveal is this stunning autumnal scene, in which Major David Thompson's riflemen have been engaged by Native Americans from the Winnebago tribe. The Kentuckians are preparing to retreat, whilst the Winnebago chief Naw Kaw is urging his warriors to advance.
That brings this month's artwork reveal to a close. Let us know what you think in the comments below.
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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 25 авг 2016, 00:01

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1. Osprey's Big Reveal: New Vanguard - 2016-08-24 07:00:00
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Next up in our Big Reveal is our New Vanguard series, which examines the machinery of warfare throughout history. With twelve new books scheduled for release in 2017 it is certainly going to be a good year for NVG fans.
Soviet Cold War Guided Missile Cruisers
Built to challenge Western navies on the high seas, guided missile cruisers formed the core of the Soviet Navy during the Cold War. These increasingly complex and formidable cruisers were deployed as the front rank of their navy, and were involved in tense stand-offs against NATO warships during times of crisis. Soviet Cold War Guided Missile Cruisers covers all classes of these impressive warships, from the early Sverdlov-class conversions through the purpose-built Kynda, Kresta, Kara and Slava classes to the enormous, nuclear-powered Kirov-class, which marked the apogee of Soviet warship technology and capability, and which remain the largest non-aircraft carrier warships built since 1945.
South African Armour of the Border War 1975–89
The Border War saw the biggest armoured battles in Africa since World War II. Starting as a counter-insurgency operation by the South African Defence Force against the SWAPO guerrillas, South Africa became embroiled in the complex Angolan Civil War, where they came up against enemies well supplied with equipment and armoured vehicles from the Soviet Union. Designed for the unique conditions of the region, South Africa’s armour was distinctive and innovative, and has influenced the design of counter-insurgency armoured vehicles around the world.
Imperial Roman Warships 193–565 AD
The period of relative peace enjoyed by the Roman Empire in its first two centuries ended with the Marcomannic Wars. The following centuries saw near-constant warfare, which brought new challenges for the Roman Navy. It was now not just patrolling the Mediterranean but also fighting against invaders with real naval skill such as Genseric and his Vandals.
With research from newly discovered shipwrecks and archaeological finds as well as the rich contemporary source material, this study examines the equipment and tactics used by the navy and the battles they fought in this tumultuous period, which includes the fall of Rome and the resurgence of the Eastern Empire under Justinian the Great.
Early US Armor: Tanks 1917–40
Having used French Renault FTs and British Mark Vs during World War I, the US contributed significantly to the development of the tank between the two world wars, with their designs including the M1 Cavalry Car and the M2 Light and Medium tanks, the precursors to the Stuart and Grant tanks of World War II. Tank designers in this period faced unique challenges, and so this story of America’s early tanks is littered with intriguing failures among the successes.
British Destroyers 1939–45: Pre-war classes
The Royal Navy entered World War II with a large but eclectic fleet of destroyers. Some of these were veterans of World War I, fit only for escort duties. Most though, had been built during the inter-war period, and were regarded as both reliable and versatile. But with new, larger and better-protected destroyers being built in Germany, Italy and Japan, the Royal Navy’s fleet of pre-war destroyers faced a tough battle in World War II. Used mainly to hunt submarines, protect convoys and capital ships from air attack, and sink other destroyers, these ships served across the globe during the war.
Soviet Lend-Lease Tanks of World War II
The Red Army suffered such catastrophic losses of armour in the summer of 1941 that they begged Britain and the United States to send tanks. The first batches arrived in late 1941, just in time to take part in the defence of Moscow. The supplies of British tanks encompassed a very wide range of types including the Matilda, Churchill, and Valentine and even a few Tetrarch airborne tanks. American tanks included the M3 (Stuart) light tank and M3 (Lee) medium tank and the M4 Sherman tank, which became so common in 1944–45 that entire Soviet tank corps were equipped with the type. This New Vanguard explains how these Western tanks performed on the Eastern Front, as well as the other significant British and American armoured vehicles that were supplied to the USSR.
Imperial Japanese Navy Antisubmarine Escorts 1941-45
In 1941, the Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN) went to war with a marginal anti-submarine warfare (ASW) capability. This was a lamentable state of affairs for a nation dependent upon imports to sustain its war economy. There were only a few purpose-built ASW escorts available at the start of the war and these were augmented by a handful of second-class destroyers and a dozen torpedo boats. Once the magnitude of the threat to Japan’s shipping became fully apparent in 1943, the IJN made plans for mass production of ASW escorts. These arrived in 1944, but could not stop the massacre of Japanese shipping by increasingly bold and effective American submarines.
Railway Guns of World War I
World War I was the Golden Age of the railway gun. Even though at the start of the conflict none of the armies possessed any such artillery pieces, more railway guns were used during this war than in any other conflict. Designed to break the stalemate of trench warfare, the first railway guns were simple, improvised designs made by mounting surplus coastal defence, fortress, and naval guns onto existing commercial railway carriages. As the war dragged on, railway artillery development shifted to longer-range guns that could shell targets deep behind enemy lines. This change of role brought much larger and more sophisticated guns often manufactured by mounting long-barrel naval guns onto specially-designed railway carriages.
Maginot Line Gun Turrets and French Gun Turret Development 1880-1940
The Maginot Line was one of the most advanced fortification systems in history. Built in the aftermath of World War I, and stretching along the French eastern border from Belgium to Switzerland, it was designed to prevent German troops from ever setting foot on French soil again.
The Maginot Line’s real capability lay in its advanced gun turrets. Deadly accurate, formidably protected and well organised, they caused havoc among the German units that attacked the line during their invasion of France in 1940. German officers who visited the forts after the armistice remarked at the exceptional performance of the crews and accuracy of the guns. This New Vanguard examines these, the teeth of the Maginot Line, and how France developed these advanced artillery systems – from the first rotatable Mougin turrets of the 1880s, through the invention of the retractable armoured turret, to their peak of perfection on the French frontier.
US Navy Escort Carriers 1942-45
The role played by the US Navy’s escort carriers was enormous, and yet they have largely been overlooked. Smaller and slower than the fleet carriers, it was their sheer numbers (the Casablanca-class was the most numerous class of carriers in history) that made them so effective. In the Atlantic, they provided the backbone of the Allied anti-submarine warfare efforts which finally and irrevocably turned the tide of the war against the U-boats in 1943, and in the Pacific they provided the air cover for the series of landings that led to the doorstep of Japan by 1945 – in the face of submarine, air, kamikaze, and even surface attacks.
British Destroyers 1939-45: Wartime-built classes
With the clouds of war looming, the British Admiralty commissioned the first of a series of powerful new destroyers, designed to take on her potential enemies. The formidable destroyers of the Tribal-class were followed by the first of slightly smaller ships, which carried fewer guns than the Tribals, but were armed with a greatly enlarged suite of torpedoes. The first of these, the ‘J/K/M class’ was followed by a number of wartime variants, with slight changes to their weaponry to suit different wartime roles. Effectively the British were building destroyers capable of facing a whole range of threats – enemy surface warships, aircraft and U-boats. These little warships saw action in defence of the Arctic Convoys, in the furious battles fought in the Mediterranean, and in the closing campaigns of the war in the Pacific.
M113 APC 1960-75: US, ARVN, and Australian variants in Vietnam
The M113 is the most widely used and versatile armoured vehicle in the world. First fielded in 1960 as an innovative, lightweight ‘battlefield taxi’, over 80,000 M113s would see service in 50 nations around the world, in an incredible range of roles. This New Vanguard concentrates on the early story of the M113, from its initial fielding through to the end of the Vietnam War, focusing on the history, design, and specifications of the M113 and M113A1, and the many distinctive US, South Vietnamese, and Australian variants that saw service and action in Southeast Asia. This 15-year period saw not only the introduction into service of all the important variants of the series, but also its most notable and exciting combat actions.

Plenty there for New Vanguard fans to get excited about. Let us know which titles you are most looking forward to in the comments section below!
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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 26 авг 2016, 00:00

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1. TWS - COMMENT PEINDRE DES VÉHICULES MILITAIRES AU 1:72 (Française) - 16,50 €
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Ce livre est le guide essentiel de la peinture et du vieillissement pour les maquettistes du 1:72ème.
2. TWS - CÓMO PINTAR VEHÍCULOS MILITARES EN 1:72 (Castellano) - 16,50 €
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Este libro es la guía esencial de pintura y envejecido para maquetas a escala 1:72.
3. TWS - HOW TO PAINT 1:72 MILITARY VEHICLES (English) - 16,50 €
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This book is the essential painting and weathering guide for 1:72 scale modelers.
4. The Weathering Magazine 16 - INTERIORS SPANISH - 8,00 €
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Este número está dedicado a los diferentes tipos de interiores que se pueden encontrar en tanques, aviones, submarinos ¡y hasta el interior de un AT-ST de Star Wars!
5. The Weathering Magazine 16 - INTERIORS ENGLISH - 8,00 €
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This issue is dedicated to different kinds of interiors that could be found in tanks, airplanes, submarines and even the interior of an AT-ST from Star Wars!
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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 26 авг 2016, 00:01

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1. Osprey's Guide to the UK August Bank Holiday - 2016-08-25 10:53:48
This is a message for our fans in the UK. Its the August Bank Holiday this weekend, and while we're sure many of you have plans, there are many of you out there who may not yet have any plans yet. But never fear, because we've done all the work for you and found some amazing events going on around the UK this weekend.

Monmouth Rebellion - Somerset
http://www.fordeabbey.co.uk/monmouth-re ... y-weekend/

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On Saturday and Sunday, the Taunton Garrison re-enact the Monmouth Rebellion, an attempt to overthrow King James VII and II in 1685. Meet the redcoat soldiers who fought against the rebel uprising of 1685 in Somerset and experience, first hand, the living conditions of a seventeenth-century foot soldier.

Highland Games - Loch Ness

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http://www.glenurquhart-highland-games.co.uk/
Near the shores of Loch Ness at Drumnadrochit in Glen Urquhart, a highland gatherings of the year is taking place. There are a range of events taking place including traditional sports such as tug-of-war, caber tossing and shot put, as well as highland dancing and a race through Glen Urquhart itself, open to runners and cyclists.

Summer of ‘66 - Hastings

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http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/visi ... ey-31-aug/
At the other end of the country down in Kent, English Heritage have been running all mont Summer of '66 in Battle to commemorate the 950th anniversary year of the battle of Hastings. There are temporary exhibitions, activities for children and tours available. There are only a few days left to take part so don't miss out!

Explosion Room - Gosport

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http://www.historicdockyard.co.uk/event ... ive-escape
The year is 1940 and you are helping with the vital war efforts in the historic C magazine building in Gosport near Portsmouth.
You are helping to sort the munitions but have found a bomb planted by enemy spies!
The door is locked.
You have 60 minutes to diffuse the bomb.
Can you find the clues and solve the puzzles before it's too late?

Roald Dahl Film Night - RAF Museum, London

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http://www.rafmuseum.org.uk/london/what ... avourites/
2016 is the 100th anniversary of the birth of famous children's author Roald Dahl. A member of the RAF during the Second World War he started writing his tales between campaigns and so the RAF Museum will be showing 3 filmes based off his works: Matilda, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, and Fantastic Mr Fox. Delight your children by showing them these classic films and then explore the museum afterwards.

We hope there are some ideas in there that might interest you. Let us know in the comments below what you are planning to do this weekend, even if it isn't a bank holiday in your country.
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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 27 авг 2016, 00:01

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1. Osprey's Big Reveal: Duel - 2016-08-26 07:10:00
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Today the Big Reveal is looking at the Duel series, which pits some of history's most powerful machines of war against one another.
Spitfire II/V vs Bf 109F: Channel Front 1940-42
As the Battle of Britain approached its conclusion, two new versions of the famous Spitfire and Messerschmitt Bf 109 arrived on the scene. The RAF could see that the Luftwaffe were stepping down their incursions into British airspace, and went on to the offensive. The Spitfire Mark II, and increasingly the Mark V, would fly over the picturesque English channel in fighter sweeps, or to escort vulnerable Blenheim bombers; waiting for them was the Bf 109F ‘Friedrich’. Yet despite the reversal of offensive and defensive dispositions, and despite the Luftwaffe deploying the bulk of their fighter strength to the Eastern Front in 1941, the Jagdflieger were able to inflict severe losses on their RAF counterparts.
Panzer 38(t) vs BT-7: Barbarossa 1941
The tank battles in the Soviet Union during the summer of 1941 were the largest in World War II, exceeding even the more famous Prokhorovka encounter during the Kursk campaign. Indeed, they were the largest tank battles ever fought.
This book examines two evenly matched competitors in this conflict, the German Panzer 38(t) and the Soviet BT-7. Both were of similar size, armed with guns of comparable firepower, and had foreign roots – the Panzer 38(t) was a Czechoslovak design and the BT-7 was an evolution of the American Christie tank. With full-colour artwork and archive and present-day photography, this absorbing study assesses the strengths and limitations of these two types against the wider background of armoured doctrine in the opening stages of Operation Barbarossa.
USS Lawrence vs HMS Detroit: The War of 1812 on the Great Lakes
The most critical naval fighting during the War of 1812 took place, not on the high seas, but on the inland lakes of North America: the Great Lakes and Lake Champlain. Carrying between 12 and 22 cannon, the British and American sloops-of-war were ship-rigged, brig-rigged or schooner-rigged vessels. Lakes actions often involved two ships facing each other broadside to broadside, the best example of which was the battle of Lake Erie in 1813 where HMS Detroit led a Royal Navy squadron against the USS Lawrence-led US Navy.

This lively study investigates the prolonged struggle between British and US sloops-of-war, highlighting the differences between the war on the lakes and the war on the oceans during the Age of Fighting Sail. It reveals the circumstances under which these ships were built, how they were armed, and the human story behind their construction and use in battle.
Sea Harrier FSR 1 vs Mirage III/Dagger: Falklands / Malvinas 1982
Following Argentina’s military occupation of the Falkland Islands / Malvinas, the British government launched a major naval operation to return them to British rule. Defending the RN task force against AAF attacks were two small squadrons totalling 22 SHARs. The question of air superiority over the islands was settled – in the SHAR’s favour – with two engagements against FAA Mirages and Daggers on 1 May 1982, after which FAA fighter-bombers used daring and courageous ultra-low level attacks, frequently escaping the SHAR’s limited capabilities to inflict serious damage to task force elements, destroying one destroyer, two frigates, and a landing ship. On three occasions, however, SHARs successfully intercepted inbound attackers, destroying seven Daggers prior to the them reaching RN vessels. This book will present the battle between the RN SHAR and Argentine Mirage/Dagger in a balanced and objective fashion, highlighting the attributes of both and the skills and courage of the pilots flying them.
Pershing vs Tiger: Germany 1945
During the final battles of World War II’s Western Front the legendary German Tiger I heavy tank clashed with the brand-new Pershing fielded by the United States. This book looks to examine the encounters between the Tigers of Gruppe Fuhrmann and the Pershings of the 9th Armored Division during March 1945, notably at Elsdorf in Germany. It also assesses the clashes between the sole M26A1E2 ‘Super Pershing’ deployed to Europe and Tigers during the final weeks of the conflict.
B-29 Superfortress vs Ki-44 ‘Tojo’: Pacific 1944–45
The Japanese knew that the B-29 was coming, but they had no idea how massive the B-29 production and training program was, or that the bomber would be armed with the world’s most sophisticated computer-guided remote controlled turret system. US Bomber crews were convinced they had their ‘ace in hole’, but the Japanese had an answer; the Ki-44 ‘Tojo’. The single-seat fighter interceptor boasted two deadly 40 mm cannon capable of destroying a B-29 with just one burst. Japanese pilots were fighting a desperate battle, but with the firepower at their disposal they would prove a worthy adversary for one of the most advanced bombers of World War II.
USN Battleship vs IJN Battleship: The Pacific 1942–44
In the build up to World War II both the United States and Japan believed their battleships would play a central role in battle, but after the Pacific War began in December 1941, the role of the battleship proved to be much more limited than either side expected. There would only be two battleship vs battleship actions in the Pacific in World War II, the Second Naval Battle of Guadalcanal and the Battle of Surigao Strait, both of which are assessed in this book.
Will all seven find a place on your bookshelf in 2017? Let us know in the comments section below!
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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 29 авг 2016, 00:00

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1. FCModeltips 1 CASTELLANO - 13,00 €
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Multiple rusting and heavy weathering painting techniques for abandoned military models.
2. STAGHOUNG T17E1 IN DETAIL - 12,00 €
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Staghounds in the Belgian Royal Army Museum and Private Collections & 1/35 Scale Models
František Kořán, Jan-Willem de Boer, Luc Snyders & Martin Velek
3. Corsair II in detail - 32,00 €
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Corsair II in Detail
Vought Corsair II A-7E and TA-7C in last 10 years service
Ioannis Lekkas
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1. The Battle of Takur Ghar - 2016-08-30 12:03:01
The battle of Takur Ghar was a tragic but important episode in the Afghan War in which seven US service members were killed and many more were wounded. Believing they would be landing on a quiet mountain peak, US troops instead found themselves up against dug-in al-Qaeda fighters in a 17-hour battle for survival.
Fourteen years later the battle has been picked up by the media once more as the President considers whether John Chapman, an Air Force technical sergeant, deserves to be awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions. It was believed that Chapman had been killed by a burst from TAQ fighters, but video evidence suggests that he may have survived and continued to fight for more than an hour before dying in an attempt to protect arriving reinforcements.
The extract below is taken from Shadow Warriors by Mir Bahmanyar, in which he talks about the attempt to rescue Neil Roberts and the circumstances surrounding John Chapman's death.
Having successfully inserted its recon package at 0300 hours, Razor 04 was rerouted to the crash site of Razor 03. Razor 04 arrived 30 minutes after the crash of Razor 03. Here, in a bit of panic, they loaded the stranded members onto their craft and returned to Gardez. The Chinook would be too heavy to return to Takur Ghar and leaving 03’s crew behind unprotected was out of the question. If only they had been informed of friendly forces in the area from the 101st, who might have been able to establish a defensive perimeter and thus allow the SEALs to rescue their fallen comrade, but faulty chains of command and a variety of communication issues created the false notion that the friendly forces were TAQ fighters instead. Lucky for the 101st, higher command was in such a shambles that requested authorization to fire on their personnel was denied.
Once at the base, the SEALs and pilots of Razor 04 drew up a hasty plan to go back and rescue Roberts. Valuable time had been lost in returning to Gardez, and undoubtedly the men were anxious to return as soon as possible. During this phase an AC-130, now on station at Takur Ghar, reported what they believed they were seeing; a handful of TAQ fighters surrounding Roberts. The pressure was mounting and ultimately all members of the Coalition SOF wanted to be the Quick Reaction Force (QRF). Some of them were loading and unloading again when ST-6 decided to go back by themselves. No doubt this left a bitter taste in some people’s mouths.

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Artwork by Johnny Shumate for Raid 39: Takur Ghar
Racing against all hope, Razor 04, five SEALs, and Air Force Technical Sergeant Chapman departed Gardez and headed back to Roberts’ last known location on Takur Ghar. Some things were known: Operation Anaconda was not going well, resources were stretched, their last attempt at insertion was greeted by devastating small-arms fire, and Neil Roberts had been on his own for a long time. Was he alive or captured? For the moment, concerns of where they would land and what they would do once there occupied them enough to push back unpleasant thoughts. One thing was for certain, time was of the essence and the team could ill-afford to land below the mountaintop, as the difficult climb would add even more time to their operation. In and out near the site where they had been engaged before was the answer. With daylight fast approaching, Razor 04 was approaching the hot HLZ.
Nobody really cared about the confusing mess back at the tactical operations center (TOC). Nobody cared about obstacles or concerns or issues or... it was the reports from Grim 32 of a handful of people on Takur Ghar that occupied their minds.
Nobody really knew what was going on or what had happened – everything was an absolute mess. Moreover, the enemy was not asleep. NAIL 22 had not cleared the area because they were unable to positively identify Roberts. As Razor 04 was inbound at 0455, one of the crew spotted a TAQ fighter manning the DShK heavy machine gun. Muzzle flashes were dancing to the front of the Chinook. The left side mini-gunner alerted the pilot that they were taking incoming fire from the 11 o’clock position of the helicopter. Querying whether or not it was effective, and receiving an affirmative answer, the pilot said “Then return fire!” The TAQ fighters directed small-arms fire into the hulking mass of the helicopter as it flared and created a mini blizzard which obscured the scene and masked the surrounding incoming fire. Mako 20, the SEAL team, and their AFCCT inserted uninjured around 0500 hours local time. The left door gunner got off a short burst before his mini-gun jammed while the right rear window gunner managed to release a long burst from his M-60. The MH- 47E, Razor 04, damaged, lumbered back to base after it had remained on holding pattern as long as its fuel supply had allowed.
Having accounted for all six men, and wearing night-vision devices, the team headed for the high ground, hoping to locate their teammate Roberts. Three two-man teams advanced toward the hill, the most prominent features on Takur Ghar being a big rock and a tall tree on the northern part of the hilltop. They had landed near Roberts’ last known location but several hours had passed. The Taliban and al-Qaeda fighters had engaged the approaching helicopter from their dug-in positions. As the rescue team approached the tree, AFCCT Chapman and Mako 20, Britt Slabinski, spotted two fighters in a fortified position, engaged and killed them almost immediately. The fight was on. TAQ fighters opened fire from a nearby bunker approximately 20 yards to their front. Chapman was hit by a burst and badly wounded. The SEALs resolutely conducted immediate action drills; small-arms fire and hand grenades hit the enemy bunker. The small teams were taking fire from the north and south. From just behind the tree and rock area a machine gun opened up on them from a small bunker. Grim 32 reported that tracers and lasers were all over the place. Chapman was hit and went down, seemingly killed as the firefight grew in intensity – hand grenades, M-203 rounds, and automatic weapons fire at extremely close and lethal range. According to the subsequent Air Force Cross award citation: “Chapman engaged and killed two enemy personnel then continued advancing until engaging a dug-in machine gun nest. At this time, the rescue team came under effective enemy fire from three directions. Chapman exchanged fire at close range with the enemy until succumbing to multiple wounds. His engagement and destruction of the first enemy position and advancement on the second enemy position enabled his team to move to cover and break enemy contact. The team leader credited Chapman’s aggressive and selfless actions with saving the lives of the entire team.”
Conditions had rendered Spectre useless as friend and foe were indistinguishable, and the team’s radio was with the striken AFCCT. Two SEALs exposed themselves to enemy fire and one of them was wounded. TAQ fighters engaged the ST from numerous locations and wounded one more commando. Several fighters had been killed. One of the two-man teams, engaged to the rear, saw Mako and the others breaking contact. In a frenzied bounding maneuver, while covering each other, the mauled team jumped over the mountain’s cliff and “glissaded 800 meters down the south side of the mountain.” Sustaining 50 percent casualties within a few short moments, the Americans were hanging on for dear life. Another DoD report states that “finding themselves in a deadly crossfire with two of their teammates seriously wounded and one killed and clearly outnumbered, the SEALs had to disengage. They shot two more al Qaeda as they moved off the mountain peak to the Northeast – with one of the wounded SEALs taking point.” No doubt the SEALs had no choice but to retreat. Staying would have been suicidal as the initiative lay now with the TAQ fighters.

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Artwork by Johnny Shumate for Raid 39: Takur Ghar
With their AFCCT dead, one of the SEALs took over communications and proceeded to contact the AC-130 on stand-by, Grim 32. Retreating down the side of the mountain, Grim 32 provided lifesaving fire with their 105mm howitzers. This fire support enabled the five men to withdraw; however, they were still in danger of being overrun. The SOF tally at this point included one destroyed helicopter, another one damaged, two seriously wounded SEALs and most importantly, two dead men. Certainly Takur Ghar had proven to be a more deadly engagement than any other part of Operation Anaconda thus far.
One disturbing fact remains to this day. As subsequent Predator footage reveals, at the same time as the SEALs break contact by popping a smoke grenade, someone is firing from the bunker. Several fighters engage the bunker near the location where AFCCT Chapman had been hit. Shortly thereafter they clear the bunker where subsequently Chapman’s body is discovered. According to Army Times correspondent Sean Naylor, Chapman had wounds to the upper and lower part of his body. He argues that probably Slabinski confused Chapman with the dead body of Roberts and as Chapman was hit but advanced the firefight became so intense that the Strike Team Leader (STLDR) did not have the opportunity physically to check the fallen comrade. Although the officially released reports did not present this scenario, other soldiers familiar with the footage and events surrounding the firefight are sure that indeed Chapman had continued the assault but was killed during the retreat of Mako. Certainly the headquarters personnel hundreds and thousands of miles away had no clue of the severity of the firefight the naval commandos had encountered. Transformation policies, micro-management and reliance on talentless but politically astute commanders failed their men yet again. Worse was to follow...
If you would like to read more about the history of the US Army Rangers then pick up a copy of Mir Behmanyar's Shadow Warriors. For more on Takur Ghar you could grab a copy of Raid 39: Takur Ghar by Leigh Neville
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1. Osprey's Big Reveal: Elite - 2016-09-02 08:46:00
MAA
COM
WPN
XPL
WAR
CBT
ACE
NVG
DUE
ELI
???
???
???



To navigate your way through the Big Reveal please use the links in the bar above.
Today's instalment of the Big Reveal looks at the Elite series, which has five new additions coming in 2017.
Vietnam War US & Allied Combat Equipments
Over the eight years of the Vietnam War, US forces used three major types of equipment sets, with numerous modifications for particular circumstances. Different equipments were also used by Special Forces, the South Vietnamese, and other allied ground troops.

Vietnam War US & Allied Combat Equipments offers a comprehensive examination of the gear that US and allied soldiers had strapped around their bodies, what they contained, and what those items were used for. Fully illustrated with photographs and artwork detailing how each piece of equipment was used, and written by a Special Forces veteran of the conflict, this book will fascinate students of military equipment and will be an ideal reference guide for re-enactors, modellers and collectors of Vietnam War memorabilia.
The Modern Russian Army 1992–2016
Since the collapse of the Soviet Union, Russia's army has undergone a turbulent transformation, from the scattered left-overs of the old Soviet military, through a period of shocking decay and demoralization, to the disciplined force and sophisticated 'hybrid war' doctrine that enabled Vladimir Putin to seize Crimea virtually overnight in 2014.
Using rare photographs and full colour images of the army in action, profiles of army leaders and defence ministers, as well as orders of battle and details of equipment and dress, this is a vivid account of the army’s troubled history and of its current character, capabilities and status.
World War II German Motorized Infantry & Panzergrenadiers
In World War II Germany's doctrine of mobile warfare dominated the battlefield. By trial and error, the Germans were the first to correctly combine their strength in tanks and in mobile infantry and artillery. This integration of mobile units, equipment and tactics underpinned Germany's successes in the first half of the war. As the war dragged on, the Allies sought to copy German tactics but German armies remained supreme in this type of warfare until their losses had seriously degraded their capabilities.
This study traces the development of the different types of unit that came together in the Panzergrenadier branch from the inter-war years through World War II. Using colour plates to display the changes in uniform, equipment and insignia in all theatres of operations throughout the conflict, this is a complete account of Hitler’s elite armoured infantry.
D-Day Beach Assault Troops
In the early hours of June 6, the first of 1944, over 150,000 Allied soldiers stormed five beaches in Normandy against fierce German resistance. They were specially trained and task-organized in a range of different landing teams depending on their means of transport, their tasks, and the resistance they anticipated. The first assault infantry were accompanied by tankers, combat engineers, and other specialist personnel, to breach German obstacles, knock out defensive positions, and to defend and prepare the beaches for the follow-on waves. On some beaches the plans worked, on others they were disrupted by bad weather, faulty timing, or enemy fire, with consequences that varied from survivable confusion to absolute carnage. This is an in-depth study of the uniforms, equipment, weapons, passage, landings, and tactics of specific US, British and Canadian units during the period from before H-Hour on June 6 to dawn on June 7.
European Counter-Terrorist Units 1972–2017
The Munich Olympics massacre in 1972 provided a shock awakening to the public. In the decades since, European countries have faced a wide range of terrorists (Palestinian, home-grown, and more recently world-wide jihadists), and an equally wide range of threats, so governments have had to invest ever-greater efforts in countering these threats. This book traces the evolution of police (and associated military) CT forces across Europe; their organization, missions, specialist equipment, and their growing cross-border co-operation. While the public may think of these squads simply as 'men in black', there is a surprisingly wide range of uniforms and personal equipment to illustrate, and the author has access to many rare photos.
Let us know what you think in the comments section below!
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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 04 сеп 2016, 00:01

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1. British Sailors Find Their Final Rest on America's Shores - 2016-09-03 07:47:00
While on vacation on Hatteras Island in the Outer Banks of North Carolina, this Yank stopped to pay his respects to two British sailors who found their final resting place far from the shores of Britain. During World War II, this stretch of the Eastern Seaboard of the US was known as “Torpedo Junction” and saw much action as German U-boats prowled offshore for tankers and other merchant ships carrying vital supplies to the UK.

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In the dead of night on April 10, 1942 one such clash occurred when U-203, skippered by Kptlt. Rolf Mützelburg, encountered the British Motor Tanker San Delfino off Cape Hatteras. San Delfino was on her way from Houston, Texas and bound for the UK when U-203 found her. The U-boat hit her with one torpedo, then followed-up with a spread that missed. For the next hour she stalked the British tanker before she was finally able to sink her with a single torpedo. Of the crew of fifty seven, twenty four were lost that night. Among them was Fourth Engineer Officer Michael Cairns of the Royal Merchant Navy. The sea kept him for nearly a month before his remains washed ashore near the Hatteras lighthouse. Like the other British seaman who perished off the coast, he was buried with all the honors and respect he had earned.
As I stood at his grave, I thought about what those last hours must been like for Mr. Cairns and his fellow crewmates. After that first attack, they had to have realized that somewhere in the dark a submarine was hunting them down. An hour is a long time when your life is hanging in the balance. Did they even see the wakes from torpedoes before they exploded against the ship, giving them a few seconds to prepare for what was about to happen? Was Mr. Cairns at his station in the engine room when San Delfino went down? Was that why he didn’t make it out?

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BMT San Delfino
Hailing from Dundee, Scotland, Cairns was just 28 when he died that morning seventy-four years ago. I’m almost twice the age he was when he died, and I brought my 11-year-old daughter with me to visit his grave, to show her that war isn’t just something you read about in a book. When I think of the soldiers, sailors and marines who gave their lives for their countries, I’m forcefully reminded that it is their sacrifices that allowed me to enjoy a full life and see my children grow, while their lives were cut so short.

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There are other British sailors interred here in the Outer Banks. On nearby Ocracoke Island, there is a cemetery that holds the remains of four British seaman who served and died on HMS Bedfordshire. She was a Royal Navy ship jointly crewed by British and Canadian sailors, and one of the patrol vessels thrown into action along the US coast when the U.S. Navy proved to be woefully unprepared to counter the U-boat threat off its shores. Bedfordshire was destroyed by U-522 the month after San Delfino met her fate.
Perhaps most hauntingly, next to Michael Cairns rests a sailor whose identity is unknown to this day. His remains washed ashore a month after Officer Cairns was found. I would like to think that it would give Mr. Cairns and those other men who found their final rest so far from home some measure of comfort to know that their graves are cared for with so much respect and devotion. Every year near the anniversary of Bedfordshire’s sinking, members of the U.S. National Park Service, U.S. Coast Guard, and British Royal Navy join with local citizens to honor these men. Officers place wreaths at the graves and local citizens read the names of the dead. The sounding of “Taps” and a 21-gun salute conclude the memorial services every year.

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Sources: uboat.net and the National Park Service
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1. September Book Vote and Last Month's Results - 2016-09-05 10:21:43
This month's book vote is looking at the Weapon series, with five firearms going head-to-head (or barrel-to-barrel) to try to get your vote. Check out the descriptions below!



WPN: The G3 Battle Rifle



WPN: .44 Magnum Revolvers



WPN: The Sterling Submachine Gun



WPN: The PK Machine Gun



WPN: The Stoner 63 Weapons System




WPN: The G3 Battle Rifle
Entering West German service in the late 1950s, the select-fire G3 battle rifle was a vital part of the NATO arsenal during the Cold War. A major export success, this rugged and versatile firearm continues to equip many countries into the present day.
WPN: .44 Magnum Revolvers
From the mid-1950s, handguns chambered for the .44 Magnum cartridge began to appear. Iconic revolvers such as the Smith & Wesson Model 29 and the Ruger Blackhawk were later joined by more recent models such as the Colt Anaconda.
WPN: The Sterling Submachine Gun
First deployed during World War II, the Sterling submachine gun equipped British forces for four decades from 1953. Accurate and reliable, it saw widespread combat across the world during the Cold War, from Vietnam to the Falklands.
WPN: The PK Machine Gun
This formidable general-purpose machine gun entered Soviet service in 1961 and remains in front-line use today. Widely exported and available in a host of variants, it is a gas-operated, belt-fed weapon firing from an open bolt.
WPN: The Stoner 63 Weapons System
Eugene Stoner’s innovative modular weapons system – capable of being configured as an assault rifle, carbine, automatic rifle and light, heavy or fixed machine gun – saw combat with US Marines and US Navy SEALs during and after the Vietnam War.

Head to the homepage to cast your vote!
We also have the results from the August book vote, which saw a variety of titles up against one another in our 'Editor's Picks' book vote.



ELI: Armies of the Baltic Wars 1919-20

30%


MAA: Italian Colonial Troops 1883-1943

25%


CBT: US Mechanized Infantryman vs Soviet Motor Rifleman: Central Europe 1983

21%


DUE: US Submarine vs Soviet Submarine: Cold War 1961-91

14%


NVG: Superguns 1860-1991

10%



Armies of the Baltic Wars 1919-20 stormed to an early lead and showed no sign of slowing down, even with late surges from Italian Colonial Troops 1883-1943 and US Mechanized Infantryman vs Soviet Motor Rifleman: Central Europe 1983. US Submarine vs Soviet Submarine: Cold War 1961-91 and NVG: Superguns 1860-1991 were left trailing in their wake.
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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 09 сеп 2016, 00:01

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1. Modern Snipers: Techniques and Technology - 2016-09-08 07:38:00
Rounding off his series on snipers, Leigh Neville, author of Modern Snipers, looks at how sniping techniques and technology have changed over the years.
Although the core attributes of the sniper remain unchanged since the Second World War- physical and mental endurance along with exacting patience paired with some outstanding marksmanship and fieldcraft- the tools and techniques of the sniper have seen a revolution. This revolution is largely a direct result of the war on terror that has waged in Iraq, Afghanistan, Syria, Libya and elsewhere since 2001. Indeed the sniper has found himself to be in greater demand today than at any time since the 1940s.
This operational tempo for both conventional and special operations snipers has seen many technological innovations developed to assist them in both their target interdiction and reconnaissance/surveillance roles. The wars themselves have also beckoned in a number of innovations in sniping techniques and tactics, some of which we can mention in the briefest terms. Firstly however, let’s look at the kit, beginning with the sniper rifle itself…

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The Gewehr 41
The sniper rifle has changed markedly since the Second World War. It has, like most infantry small arms, become lighter, more accurate and more durable. Semi-automatic sniper rifles have entered widespread use overcoming the reliability problems of the early German G41, G43 and Soviet SVT-40. In fact, today’s sniper is probably just as likely to be using a semi-auto as a traditional bolt-action. As we’ve discussed in earlier blog posts in this series, the semi-auto offers a number of advantages for the modern sniper, particularly in urban environments.
The calibre of the issue sniper rifle has also increased with many units adopting .300 Winchester Magnum or increasingly the .338 Lapua Magnum as their standard sniping calibre. The larger calibres of course offer greater lethality but, equally importantly, greater range and velocity. In the early 2000s, snipers in Afghanistan found that they were engaging targets that were at the extreme edge of the envelope for their 7.62x51mm sniper rifles. Many armies began replacing or supplementing these with .300, .338 or .50 sniping platforms.
The rifles themselves have now been made lighter with the use of polymers and skeletonised stocks. They are also now typically fitted with sound suppressors, infra-red lasers and integral bipods, all of which make the rifle more accurate and the sniper harder to locate, particularly at night or form a camouflaged hide. Many rifles even feature swing-out thermal imaging attachments that work with the rifle’s scope to display the thermal profile of a target in any light conditions.

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A U.S. Marine receives instruction on the SVD, which features a skeletonized thumbhole stock.
The humble telescopic scope itself has also advanced tremendously. Today’s sniper optics bear little resemblance to their Second World War predecessors. Scopes now feature bullet drop compensators that make allowances for the drop of the bullet at various ranges, the Horus reticle allows much faster shot corrections, and many optics now feature co-located mini red dot sights to allow the sniper to use his rifle at close quarters should he be forced to clear a building or is suddenly ambushed. The scopes are also typically armoured in construction to defeat the effects of blast or blow.
Developments in ammunition design have seen new bullet types emerge that are so-called barrier blind meaning they can defeat intervening objects in the path of the sniper’s round and continue on to strike the target. Other rounds like the Raufoss Mk211 have been designed to penetrate light armoured vehicles using a tungsten penetrator before an explosive incendiary detonates inside. Not surprisingly these are devastating on human targets. Other specialist rounds like solid copper alloy bullets have even been developed to defeat even reinforced glass with minimal deflection.
The other great technological revolution has been in the field of ballistic computer programmes and apps. Many of these were initially Blackberry based but are now available for the ubiquitous iPhone and iPad. The best of these will calculate a firing solution taking into account spin drift, wind (snipers routinely carry the likes of the Kestrel wind meter to measure the effects of wind at his final firing point), barometric pressure and temperature, and even Coriolis drift- the gravitational effect of the rotation of the Earth on the sniper’s bullet.
Although widely employed, snipers are careful to know the limitations of such devices. Former Sniper Master for the Australian Army, Company Sergeant Major Nathan Vinson, confirmed this to the author; “This only calculates factors from the shooter’s end, not at the target end. It increases your chances of getting a first round hit but doesn’t guarantee it.” Even with the latest ballistic app, the sniper still needs to be able to read crosswinds that will affect the path of his round and factor in the movement of the target itself.

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A Dutch ISAF sniper team with VECTOR IV Leica/Vectronix laser rangefinder binoculars.
Judging the range to the target however has become as simple as pressing a button. Today’s laser range finders have in-built GPS receivers so the exact range to the target, and the GPS grid of that target, can be recorded. Increasingly this data can be uploaded into Blue Force Tracker and similar battlespace management systems to show the location of enemy units, allowing a commander to have the very latest picture of enemy dispositions. It can also be uploaded through Rover terminals used by forward observers and air controllers to guide in indirect fire missions or air strikes.
Many of the techniques and tactics used by today’s snipers cannot be discussed for operational security reasons but several areas of innovation can be touched upon. Huge leaps have been made in high altitude and high angle shooting for instance, with specialist courses teaching the impact of altitude and pressure on ballistics and the use of the angle cosine indicator that helps correct for the increased bullet drop. More than a decade of combat in the mountains of eastern Afghanistan has taught the sniping community the importance of training for operating at altitude.
Snipers are also now as highly skilled in reconnaissance techniques as they are in marksmanship- many snipers argue that their primary role is now to serve as the eyes and ears of the battlespace commander. They are trained in the use of all manner of digital cameras and active and passive surveillance technologies along with burst transmission satellite radios, allowing them to upload imagery and situation reports covertly from their hide site. The sniper can provide detail that no drone can.
We’ve touched upon aerial interdiction in an earlier blog but it is worth mentioning as a technique that really saw its evolution during the war on terror. Snipers were increasingly used to disable insurgent or terrorist vehicles with precision fire, offering a chance of capture and effectively negating the collateral damage that may be caused should a Hellfire missile or bomb be deployed against the target. Snipers have also been used to interdict terrorist suicide bombers in explosive laden cars or trucks known as VBIEDs (Vehicle Borne IED). Coalition special operations snipers are even today eliminating Islamic State suicide VBIEDs with precision fire in Iraq and Syria.

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Honolulu Police Department Specialized Services Division Counter-Sniper Team conducting aerial platform training.
What does the future hold in terms of sniping technologies? The rifles themselves will continue to become lighter and more compact. They will also be increasingly modular allowing a sniper a choice of calibres and barrel lengths dependent upon the tactical requirement. Many believe we will also see an increased use of so-called smart or guided rounds.
These may take the form of semi-intelligent projectiles that are either guided through a scope, much in the manner of an ATGM, or that lock-on to a target and react to target movement. Along with a number of classified efforts, the commercial TrackingPoint system shows promise. TrackingPoint will calculate the optimal firing solution and will only fire when those conditions offering a high probability of a hit are met.
Other developments will be in the field of camouflage. Although the legendary Ghillie suit is still widely used, today’s versions typically mask the sniper’s infra-red signature, and in some cases reduces his thermal signature making him much harder to detect should the enemy be using night vision technology. Currently being trialled is the next generation of that system-active camouflage that mimics its surroundings in Chameleon like fashion. Tom Clancy’s Ghost Recon finally meets reality!
For more reading on the role of snipers in modern warfare pick up a copy of Leigh Neville's Modern Snipers, now available on our online store.
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1. Osprey's Big Reveal: Campaign - 2016-09-09 07:00:00
MAA
COM
WPN
XPL
WAR
CBT
ACE
NVG
DUE
ELI
CAM
???
???



Rounding of our sneak peek at series books coming out in 2017 is a look at our upcoming titles from one of our most popular series - Campaign. We have thirteen new books to announce, ranging from Hannibal's victory at Lake Trasimene to the battle of Luzon, one of the hardest fought campaigns in the Pacific theatre of World War II
Lake Trasimene 217 BC
Following Hannibal’s crushing victory at the battle of the Trebbia, the reeling Roman Republic sent a new army under the over-confident consul Caius Flaminius to destroy the Carthaginian invaders – unbeknownst to him they were ready and waiting. The destruction of the Roman force at Lake Trasimene firmly established Hannibal as one of the Ancient World’s greatest commanders thanks to his use of innovative tactics, including the first recorded use of a turning movement. The Romans would not send another major army to confront him until the battle of Cannae in 216 BC.
Darwin 1942
Following the devastating raids on Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1941, lightning advances by Japanese forces throughout the Pacific and the Far East, and a desperate battle by the Allied command in the Dutch East Indies, it became evident that an attack on Australia was more a matter of ‘when’ and not ‘if’.
On 19 February, just eleven weeks after the attacks on Pearl Harbor and two weeks after the fall of Singapore, the same Japanese battle group that had attacked Hawaii was ordered to attack the ill-prepared and under-defended Australian port of Darwin.
Kursk 1943
Mauled at Stalingrad, the German army looked to regain the initiative on the Eastern Front with a huge offensive launched near the city of Kursk, 280 miles south-west of Moscow. Armed with the new Panther tank, Hitler and Field Marshal von Manstein were confident that they could inflict another crushing defeat on the Soviet Union. What they did not know is that the Soviets knew about the coming attack, and they were ready.
Luzon 1945
Driven from the Philippines in 1942, General Douglas MacArthur returned three years later to force the Japanese off of its main island of Luzon. Containing the capital of Manila, vital natural resources as well as thousands of Allied prisoners of war, the triumph at Luzon would be a vital step on the road to victory as the Americans continued to island-hop their way towards the Japanese home islands. This new study details one of the hardest-fought campaigns of the Pacific War with Japanese fatalities alone on Luzon topping 200,000.
Fontenoy 1745
A disputed succession to the Austrian throne led to general war between the leading powers of Europe in 1740, with France, Spain and Prussia on one side, and Britain, Hapsburg Austria and the Dutch Republic on the other. While fighting occurred across the globe, the bloodiest battles were fought in Europe, with none more costly than the battle of Fontenoy in 1745.
Fearing an encirclement of France by a resurgent Hapsburg-controlled Austria, the French commander Marshall Saxe planned to overrun the Austrian Netherlands, thereby dealing a decisive blow against their enemy’s ability to wage war. Saxe’s army, the cream of the French military, invaded and set up a defensive position at Fontenoy, near Tournai – daring his enemies to knock him off his perch.
St Lô 1944
Following the D-Day landings of 6 June 1944, the US army found itself engaged in a brutal attritional struggle to break out of the Normandy beach-head. The hedgerow country of lower Normandy, called the Bocage, presented unanticipated tactical problems since it proved to be ideal for German infantry defense. This certainly proved true at the city of St Lô, the site of a crucial-cross roads and a vital objective for the Allied forces. US forces found themselves up against a determined German force that put up a staunch defence in one of the key engagements in the battle of Normandy.
Shanghai and Nanjing 1937
From 1931, China and Japan had been embroiled in a number of small-scale conflicts that had seen vast swathes of territory occupied by the Japanese. On 7 July 1937, the Japanese engineered the Marco Polo Bridge Incident, which led to the fall of Beijing and Tianjin and the start of a de facto state of war between the two countries. This force then moved south, landing an expeditionary force to take Shanghai and from there drive west to capture Nanjing.
The Bar Kokhba Revolt AD 132-135
In 132 AD, Shimeon Bar Kosiba, a rebel leader who assumed the messianic name Simon Bar Kokhba ('son of a star'), led the people of Judaea and Galilee in open rebellion, aiming to oust the occupying Romans and establish their own independent Jewish state. During the ensuing 'Bar Kokhba Revolt' (the Second Jewish War), the Jewish rebels held their own against the crack Roman troops for four years. The cost of this rebellion was catastrophic: hundreds of thousands of casualties, the destruction of Jerusalem as the Jewish capital and the expulsion of the Jewish community from the region, which only effectively ended with the founding of the State of Israel in 1948.
Savannah 1779
In 1778 Great Britain launched a second invasion of the southern colonies as part of the “southern strategy” for victory in the American Revolutionary War. A force of 3,000 British soldiers, Hessians and Loyalists was dispatched from New York City to capture Savannah, the capital of the State of Georgia. The city fell in December 1778, and became a base for British operations in the southern colonies. Desperate to regain one of the most important southern cities, Continental troops under General Benjamin Lincoln joined forces with a French naval expedition under the Admiral Charles-Henri d’Estaing in an an all-out assault on the British fortified positions protecting Savannah.
Operation Torch 1942
Following the raid of Pearl Harbor and the entry of the United States into World War II, President Franklin D. Roosevelt identified the European theatre as his country’s priority. Their first joint operation with the British was Operation Torch, the largest and most complex amphibious invasion at the time. Three landings took place simultaneously across the French North African coast in an ambitious attempt to trap and annihilate the Axis’ North African armies between the invading forces under General Eisenhower and British Field-Marshall Montgomery’s Eighth Army in Egypt.
Philippine Sea 1944
The battle of the Philippine Sea took place during the United States' amphibious invasion of the Mariana Islands during the Pacific War, and involved the US Fifth Fleet and the Japanese Mobile Fleet in one of the epic naval engagements of the war.
The two fleets clashed on 19/20 June 1944 and the Japanese carrier fighters were shot down in devastating numbers by US aircraft in what became known as the 'Great Marianas Turkey Shoot', before US counterattacks and submarine strikes forced the withdrawal of the Japanese fleet.
Nashville 1864
Falling between the exciting events of Sheridan’s Shenandoah campaign and the conclusion of Sherman’s March to the Sea, General John Hood’s invasion of Tennessee has been largely forgotten. Yet for eleven weeks the fate of the Civil War was held in the balance of this campaign, teetering on a knife’s edge as Hood’s force threatened Union supply lines. Victory could very well have turned the tides of the war to favouring the Confederacy again, whilst defeat would be another heavy blow to the already faltering Confederate war effort.
The Hindenburg Line 1918
From 26 September until 6 October 1918, the Allied Armies in France launched their biggest ever combined offensive on the Western Front. Two million troops of the British, French, American and Belgian Armies launched four attacks in rapid succession across a 250km front between the Argonne and Flanders.
At the centre of these events was the British First, Third and Fourth Armies’ attack on the formidable ‘Hindenburg Line’ defences between Cambrai and St Quentin. Assisted by the French First Army, the British, Australian, Canadian and American troops breached three defence lines consisting of deep trenches, dense wire entanglements, concrete bunkers and extensive tunnel systems arranged in a zone four miles deep. This victory stood in stark contrast to the inconclusive assaults of 1916–17 and demonstrated for the first time that the Allies had achieved strategic, operational and tactical dominance over their German foe.
That brings our Osprey series reveals to a close, but there are more books to announce for 2017. Watch this space!
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1. 100 Years of the Tank: British Tanks in World War I - 2016-09-12 07:35:06
Throughout this week we will be celebrating the centenary of the tank with a series of blogs looking at armoured warfare over the past 100 years. In this first instalment David Fletcher, author of the recently published British Battle Tanks: World War I to 1939 and a number of books in the New Vanguard series, examines British tanks in World War I.
Tanks went into battle for the very first time on 15 September 1916 on the Somme. They later came to be known as Mark I tanks although their crews invariably referred to them as Cars or Buses. They were the only type available and came in two versions, male and female. You could tell them apart by the fact that the male tanks carried a long six-pounder gun in each sponson, while the females had different shaped sponsons, each armed with a pair of Vickers water-cooled, heavy machine guns of .303 inch calibre.

Изображение
A British Mark I male tank near Thiepval on 25 September 1916, fitted with wire mesh to deflect grenades and the initial steering tail
Inside each tank was the same, except for ammunition stowage which was arranged to suit each version. Power was provided by a six-cylinder, 105hp petrol engine by the Daimler Motor Company Ltd of Coventry (British Daimler) which drove into a two-speed gearbox and then through a Daimler differential to auxiliary gears in the track frames. These provided two extra speeds and were also used for steering. Each tank towed two wheels behind it on a short frame which were used for steering but were easily damaged.
Each tank had a crew of eight; a driver and commander sitting side by side at the front, four men to act as gun crew, two each side; either a gunner and loader for a six-pounder or machine-gunners in female tanks and two men detailed as secondary gearsmen, stationed nearer the back.
The Mark IV tank was introduced in 1917. It weighed about 28 tons and had the same engine and driving arrangements inside as the Mark I, although the wheeled tail was no longer fitted. The Mark IV however had thicker armour and although there were again male and female versions (with Lewis machine-guns instead of Vickers), new designs of sponson (and shorter six-pounder guns) were fitted and were made to fold inside the tank to narrow it down for rail travel. On the Mark I you had to unbolt the sponsons and lift them off for train journeys, the sponsons travelling separately.

Изображение
A female Mark IV tank C14. Photographed with German Forces after the Battle of Cambrai.
Image courtesy of Bundersarchiv
Mark IV tanks were used from the summer of 1917, at the Third Battle of Ypres and later, with more success, at Cambrai on 20 November 1917. In fact although theoretically replaced by more up to date models, so many Mark IV tanks were built that they remained in service until the end of the war.
The next British heavy tank to see service was the Mark V which first appeared in the summer of 1918. Although it looked similar to the Mark IV from the outside, inside it was quite different. A new six-cylinder engine rated at 150hp and designed by Harry Ricardo, but petrol again, drove through a four-speed gearbox into steering epicyclics in the track frames designed by Walter Wilson. From the outside there were differences: there was an extra box-like cab on top of the hull with a prominent semaphore signalling device alongside it and ventilation louvres on the sides of the hull. Once again there were male and female versions only this time an air-cooled Hotchkiss machine-gun had replaced the Lewis.

Изображение
Mark V male tank with short 6-pounder Hotchkiss gun in right sponson.
A longer version, known as the Mark V* was also introduced in 1918. Six feet had been added to the hull so that the tank could cross wider trenches, although since it had the same engine it was a bit slower than the Mark V and less manoeuvrable. Yet again there were male and female versions. Mark V tanks fought at the Battle of Hamel (4 July) with the Australians while Mark V and V* tanks were used at the historic Battle of Amiens on 8 August 1918. Both types were also used at the Second Battle of Cambrai at the end of September 1918, but the number of serviceable tanks available was shrinking fast, although the Great War was nearly over.
The other type of British tank to see war service was the Medium Mark A, or Whippet. Totally different from the heavy tanks it was, in some respects more difficult to drive, Although a prototype, known as the Tritton Chaser, was demonstrated in March 1917 it did not enter service until early 1918. With a skilled driver it was fast, about 8 mph maximum and a lot more manoeuvrable although it had an unfortunate reputation for trying to roast and asphyxiate its crew. As a result, two crews of three men were in service with each tank, operating on alternate days. There was no male version of the Whippet, the tank was armed with three Hotchkiss machine-guns and like all British tanks in the First World War it had no sprung suspension at all. It just bumped and rattled over the ground.
David Fletcher's latest book, British Battle Tanks: World War I to 1939, was published last month. Click here for more details.
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