Новини - литература и периодика - Архив 2016г.

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Новини - литература и периодика - Архив 2016г.

Мнение от simo » 31 дек 2015, 21:11

Продължаваме новините за литература и периодика с нови сили и през 2016г.
Симеон Иванов (simo)
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1. January Book Vote and last month's results - 2016-01-01 09:49:25
The first book vote of 2016 is focusing on the New Vanguard series, with the editor providing 5 fascinating topics that could be covered. To give you a little help in making your decision, we have also included a rough synopsis of what the editor thinks each volume could cover. Please note that they are very early ideas and as such are subject to change.



NVG: Fireships and Hellburners


NVG: South American Dreadnoughts


NVG: Soviet Fast Missile Boats of the Cold War


NVG: The Royal Scots Navy


NVG: The Modern Chinese Navy




NVG: Fireships and Hellburners
Before the invention of the self-propelled torpedo, the fireship was the way to destroy an enemy’s ships from a distance. If packed with gunpowder rather than just flammable material, the fireship became the ‘hellburner’ – a floating time-bomb, used to devastating effect in the siege of Antwerp. This NVG would concentrate on the fireships – both purpose-built and converted – of the age of fighting sail, but also look at other examples of fireships and how they were used through history.
NVG: South American Dreadnoughts
The great race to rearm navies with dreadnought battleships was not confined to Europe. Brazil’s order of its first British dreadnoughts sparked an arms race with its rivals Argentina and Chile, as each vied for the upper hand in South American waters. This would cover the politics of the arms race as well as the technical detail of the battleships, and how they served their navies for decades.
NVG: Soviet Fast Missile Boats of the Cold War
The USSR’s fast missile boats were the Cold War equivalent of the torpedo boat – fast and cheap, and with armament capable of sinking the largest warships, but short-ranged and vulnerable. They were sold around the world, and fought the world’s first naval missile battles – in the Arab-Israeli and Indo-Pakistan wars.
NVG: The Royal Scots Navy
From the Middle Ages until the 1707 Acts of Union, the independent Kingdom of Scotland relied on its own naval power. James IV built new shipyards and ordered a fleet that included the then-biggest warship in Europe – the Great Michael, twice the size of the Mary Rose. Over the next two centuries, Scottish warships sailed the Atlantic, quelled rebellious lords in the Highlands, took part in European conflicts, occasionally fought ships of the English Royal Navy, and its privateers preyed on merchant shipping.
NVG: The Modern Chinese Navy
The People’s Republic of China is becoming one of the world’s major naval powers. Its large surface fleet, amphibious capabilities, and development of carrier aviation, coupled with tensions in the South China Sea and Taiwan Strait, mean that the world’s attention is focusing on China’s power at sea. This NVG would be an examination of the current technology and capabilities of the Chinese Navy’s warships, as well as its plans for the future.
Head onto the homepage to cast your vote!

Now lets look back at last month's Book Vote, which offered a number of different series looking at World War II topics. Here are the results:



DUE: British Battleship vs Italian Battleship: Mediterranean 1940-43
34%


FOR: Czechoslovak Border Fortifications
21%


MAA: WWII Allied Battlefield Medics
20%


NVG: Precision-Guided Munitions of World War II
15%


WAR: US Navy Seaman 1941-45
10%



The Duel title on British Battleship vs Italian Battleship: Mediterranean 1940-43 stormed to victory in December with a whopping 34% of the votes, leaving MAA: WWII Allied Battlefield Medics and FOR: Czechoslovak Border Fortifications trailing by a decent margins and NVG: Precision-Guided Munitions of World War II and WAR: US Navy Seaman 1941-45 falling even further behind.
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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 07 яну 2016, 12:00

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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 08 яну 2016, 12:00

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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 09 яну 2016, 00:02

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1. Atlas of the Eastern Front: Stalingrad - 2016-01-08 11:39:48
The Eastern Front of World War II was the most significant and ferocious theatre of the conflict. In four unremitting years of war, millions of soldiers fought along a staggering 1,600 mile long front which stretched from the ice of the Arctic Circle to the rugged mountains of the Caucasus.
To celebrate the publication of Atlas of the Eastern Front: 1941-45, we have pulled two extracts from the book's section on the titanic Battle of Stalingrad, complete with two stunning maps. The first depicts the initial German offensive in the autumn of 1942, and the second the final destruction of Paulus's 6. Armee in January 1943.


Map 52: Stalingrad (I) – 14 to 26 September, 1942

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Extract
"The German attack began at 0630 on 14 September and made good progress in the centre and south. By noon they had progressed through the suburbs and into the city centre, using artillery to kick Chuikov from his command post on the Mamayev kurgan (burial mound, also known as hill 102) a couple of hours later. The 4. Panzer-Armee assault parties reached the Volga in numerous places and approached the large grain elevators. Both the central and southern train stations seemed in danger of falling to the Germans. The 71. and 76. Infanterie-Divisionen made spectacular advances into the city centre and threatened to chase Chuikov out of another command post. Eremenko rushed reinforcements including the 13th Guards Division across the broad river and into the fight. In the south the battle stabilized with the Red Army still in possession of the grain elevator. On the 15th, the central railway station changed hands numerous times, but by nightfall it too remained in Soviet possession.
Stalingrad was in real danger of falling on 14 September when Hoth’s 24. Panzer-Division reached the Volga and then wheeled north, threatening to roll up both the 64th and 62nd Armies. A day later, Stalin dispatched two brigades across the river to further secure the ferry-boat staging area and to halt the panzers. The latter, the 92nd Naval Infantry Brigade, arguably saved the day. For his part, Hitler gave Paulus overall control of the Stalingrad battle, detaching the XLVII Panzer-Korps from Hoth. Given the inexperience of Paulus contrasted with Hoth’s excellent field leadership throughout the first three years of World War II, this was a curious, if not decisive, decision. By the 18th, 71. Infanterie-Division indeed forced Chuikov out of his Pushkin Street command bunker, while the 13th Guards almost ceased to exist. Eremenko was becoming desperate, and 24 hours later began launching low-odds counterattacks everywhere.
With both sides nearing exhaustion, by the third week of September the battle hung in the balance. As of the 21st, only the 92nd Naval Infantry remained south of the Tsaritsa River. In the centre, the Soviets held only a few slivers of land right on the Volga banks. They had lost many ferry-boat staging areas, absolutely critical to keeping the defence of Stalingrad going. Desperate counterattacks on the 22nd, they failed to lever the Germans off their hard-won positions. On 22 September, troops belonging to XLVIII Panzer-Korps captured the grain elevator and the following day the 92nd Brigade withdrew to the far bank of the Volga. Paulus’s men had suffered grievously as well, but appeared on the verge of victory."

Map 59: Operation Koltso (Ring), 10 January to 2 February, 1943

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Extract
"Seven Soviet armies encircled 6. Armee’s 20 German and two Romanian divisions. On 25 November the first Luftwaffe supply planes arrived, but they could never make good on Göring’s boast to fly in 600 tons per day. Paulus planned an all-around defence, but by the end of the month had lost half the pocket’s territory, finally halting the Soviets in early December. Distracted by Little Saturn and Wintergewitter (against which Operation Koltso’s main effort, 2nd Guards Army, was dispatched), the Red Army settled for pounding the Stalingrad pocket with artillery. Attrition and wastage reduced the 6. Armee’s actual combat strength to a small fraction of its quarter of a million reported strength. Rokossovsky’s seven armies included only slightly more men, but they enjoyed superior morale and logistics.
On 8 January the Soviets issued a surrender ultimatum to Paulus, which he rejected. Two days later, 21st and 65th Armies launched Koltso from the west and within two days had pushed three German divisions out of ‘the Nose’ and behind the lower Rossoshka River. After a week of fighting, and joined by the 57th, 24th and 66th Armies, they had overrun the western half of the pocket, including the Pitomnik airfield. From the German point of view this looked disastrous, but the Soviets were dismayed by their failure to land the knockout blow. Wehrmacht numbers far exceeded the Stavka’s intelligence estimates. Rokossovsky paused to re-organize and then resumed his assault against the northern perimeter on the 20th. In these two weeks, 6. Armee’s combat strength had dropped from 80,000 to fewer than 20,000.
Rokossovsky resumed his attack on 22 January with the 57th Army leading the way from the south-west. Paulus wanted to surrender on humanitarian grounds, but this argument had no effect on Hitler. By this time, 6. Armee was mainly a collection of the unattended wounded, sick and starving. The Soviets captured Gumrak airstrip on the 23rd and the Mamai kurgan two days later; the 62nd and 21st Armies had split the pocket in two. On 29 January the southern group was further subdivided. Germans in the northern pocket began surrendering the next night, while Paulus waited until the last day of the month to do so. The remnants of six divisions of XI Armee-Korps held out around the tractor factory until 2 February. German losses amounted to nearly 150,000 dead and more than 90,000 taken prisoner. Soviet casualties totalled 1.1 million, including almost 500,000 dead."
Altas of the Eastern Front: 1941-45 by Robert Kirchubel will be published on 20 January worldwide and can be preordered today.
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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 09 яну 2016, 12:00

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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 14 яну 2016, 00:01

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1. Book Diaries - Battlescenes - 2016-01-13 08:07:52
Battlescenes
The second plate categories in a New Vanguard are the battlescenes or ‘technicals’. They are really one type of plate, although the focus of each is different. A battlescene is … well … a battle. A technical is an illustration of some aspect of operating the item highlighted in the New Vanguard. Loading the bombs into a bomb bay is a technical. Dropping the bombs over the target is a battlescene. Regardless, I approach both the same way.
The first step is to identify characteristic battles (battle scenes) or activities (technicals). I like picking something that is not commonly seen. In American Light and Medium Frigates I chose the battle between Constellation and Venguer rather than the more famous battle between Constellation and l’Insurgente. Why? Because I knew of a dozen paintings or drawings of the Constellation fighting l’Insurgente. I could not find one of Constellation fighting Venguer. Why redo what has been done, repeatedly, when I could do something new?

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Constellation vs L'Venguer – the battle no one illustrates
In Great Lakes Warships one of my battlescenes involved the frequently-illustrated Battle of Lake Champlain. My different take was to show Saratoga as it rotated 150 degrees to bring its undamaged broadside to bear on the British. No one had ever shown that before. Part of the fun (for me) was figuring out how it was done. Any reader of C. S. Forester or Patrick O’Brian has read about anchoring on springs. I got to figure out how it was done and how it worked so I could instruct the artist on what it looked like. Neat stuff!
Seaplane carrier battle scenes can be a bit tricky. They were not supposed to mix it up with surface warships, and there were no WWI exchanges of airstrikes as was so common in in WWII. One battle plate ended up showing aircraft launching for an airstrike. I could have used one of several strikes, including the start of the Cuxhaven Raid. An even better one was the Wakamiya’s attack on Tsingtao. It was the first-ever carrier airstrike. Plus, while the Cuxhaven Raid had been illustrated several times (in photos and artwork), even getting an illustration of the Wakamiya was a challenge. So, let’s put the Japanese in a plate. I showed the start of the strike: a Maurice Farman taking off with Wakamiya in the background.

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A Maurice Farman being lifted off Wakamiya
The other battlescene was a little more kinetic – for the seaplane carrier. HMS Ben-My-Chree was sunk by artillery on the Turkish mainland while anchored in a Greek harbor on an island off the coast of Anatolia. So how did I put together the scene?
I was fortunate to find a picture of Ben-My-Chree being shelled, and another one of the ship on the bottom. They were not publication quality, but were good enough for an artist’s brief. I also had plan drawings of Ben-my-Chree, overhead and side.
Good enough? Nope. If this had been on the open ocean I could have gotten away with it, but this took place in a harbor. I needed to depict the land around the battle scene, which was clearly visible in the photos. I needed a map of the harbor.
Three cheers for the Internet. In 1915 I would have needed to find a hydrographic map of Kastellorizo harbor. Today I can go to Google Earth. Sure enough, I found the harbor – and the area around it – and took a screenshot of the area.

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This graphic was part of the artist's brief for the Loss of the Ben-My-Chree plate
Better still, an Internet search uncovered pictures of Kastellorizo from 1922 and the present. The 1922 photo was black and white and poor quality. The 21st-century photos were from photo sharing sites – vacation pictures. They showed the city was not much altered from 1917, when the battle was fought. I could use the modern pictures to show the artist what the town looked like – in color!
How do I know the colors were right? Because the buildings were whitewashed back then, and the roofs an unpainted terracotta. Today there are pastel colors on some buildings, but I told the artist to use white for the walls. The roofs remain unpainted terracotta.
I think it should make a visually effective plate. The gray warships and grimy smoke will make a striking contrast to the cheerful colors of the town. It is the type of thing you live for as a Osprey author.




Previous: The Cuxhaven Raid
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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 16 яну 2016, 00:02

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1. An important update regarding January orders - 2016-01-15 15:49:20
As part of Osprey’s ongoing integration with Bloomsbury Publishing, there will be unfortunately some disruption this month in fulfilling orders through the Osprey website. Please see below for more information:
Due to planned changes in our distribution and warehouses, orders in the US and Canada placed after 18:59 EST on Monday 18th January, and orders placed in the UK and the Rest of World after 23:59 GMT on Tuesday 26th January will not be processed by our warehouses until Monday 1st February. Unfortunately this means that there will be a delay in fulfilling and shipping all orders placed after these dates.
Orders can still be placed on our website after these dates and our 25% discount will still be valid for all orders placed until Sunday 31st January, but they will not be processed until Monday 1st February.
We’re sorry about the disruption to your book buying. We hope to be back to normal in the first week of February.
2. New Artwork from April Books! - 2016-01-15 08:29:33
The first artwork reveal of 2016 is here, with three beautiful plates to showcase from our April 2016 releases. Enjoy!

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Campaign 292: Camden 1780 by David Smith
Our first illustration is the work of Graham Turner and shows a soldier overlooking the Bombardment of Charleston from a battery at Fenwick's Point.
Click here to view the book.


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Warrior 179: US Army Green Beret in Afghanistan 2001-02 by Leigh Neville
Next up is this great plate from Peter Dennis, which shows troops conducting specialist mobility training with their ground mobility vehicles or GMVs.
Click here to view the book.

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Men-at-Arms 505: Imperial Chinese Armies 1840-1911 by Philip S. Jowett
Last, but by no means least, is this stunning illustration by Gerry Embleton. It depicts Li Hung-change, one of the most prominent Chinese political and military figures of the late 19th century, flanked by a Captain of the Imperial Army and a standard-bearer from the Army of Ch'iu Feng-chia.
Click here to view the book.
Have these three plates whetted your appetite for our upcoming titles? Let us know in the comments section below.
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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 22 яну 2016, 00:01

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1. An important update regarding the change in distributors. - 2016-01-21 11:32:02
As mentioned in my previous blog, Osprey is currently in the process of changing distributors. We are changing the companies that deliver the books to you, working with new suppliers, across the world.
This has unfortunately had an effect on the stock feed for the website, something that you will certainly all notice in the next couple of weeks. As stock is shifted from one distributor to the other it will display as ‘Out of Stock’ on the website, meaning that whilst our books are on the lorries it will be impossible for them to be ordered on our site.
I’m sorry that this will impact on your book-buying. Once we are moved, have found the tea bags and unpacked all the boxes we should be back to normal. We’ll keep you up to date with our progress.
We would also like to let you know that the 25% January Discount will be being extended into the first week of February to give you the chance to order the books that were unavailable.
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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 23 яну 2016, 00:01

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1. January New Releases Quiz! - 2016-01-22 09:15:55
Our January 2016 releases are now available, which means its time for you to test your knowledge in our January New Releases Quiz. Give it a go and let us know how you do in the comments section below!


Can't see the quiz? Click here for a direct link.
Here are the books the questions were drawn from:
Question One - Campaign 289: Burma Road 1943-44
Question Two - Duel 71: M48 Patton vs Centurion
Question Three - New Vanguard 230: Imperial Roman Warships 27 BC-193 AD
Question Four - Elite 208: US Marine Corps Recon and Special Operations Uniforms & Equipment 2000-15
Question Five - Weapon 44: The Flintlock Musket
Question Six - Combat 15: US Infantryman vs German Infantryman
Question Seven - Aircraft of the Aces 128: Aces of Jagdgeschwader Nr III
Question Eight - Men-at-Arms 508: Armies of the War of the Pacific 1879–83
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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 27 яну 2016, 00:01

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1. Australian Soldiers through the 20th Century - 2016-01-26 00:01:23
Today is Australia Day, a national public holiday for our friends down under commemorating the founding of New South Wales on 26 January 1788. It is a celebration of everything that is great about Australia and being Australian, and here at Osprey we thought we’d chip in with a bit of Australian military history.
Please use the navigational links at the bottom of the page to progress through our Australia Day blogs.

This blog series will be looking at Australian soldiers in the 20th century. To start with we have a plate from Men-at-Arms 123: The Australian Army at War 1899-1975, which shows an Australian Major and Private in South Africa, 1900.

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Artwork by Mike Chappell
Extract from Men-at-Arms 123: The Australian Army at War 1899-1975 by John Laffin:
On the left: Private, Australian volunteer mounted infantry; South Africa, 1900
This solder of a Bushmen’s unit is dressed in a simple uniform of khaki drill, without insignia. The two-pocket tunic has a stand collar, normally worn open and sometimes with a knotted handkerchief or sweat-rag. The breeches are confined by puttees wound from the top, tied at the ankle – the opposite practice to 1914-18. The slouch hat has a plain khaki puggaree, a rolled length of cloth pressed flat and then wound with cord; the plumed emu feathers were still worn by Light Horse personnel in 1914-18. The weapon is the .303 Magazine Lee Enfield Mk I; on the march it was carried with the butt in a ‘bucket’ by the right stirrup, and the trooper rode with his hand on it at all times so that he could ‘take it with him’ if he fell off. Ammunition is carried in a 50-round bandolier, each section of ten individual loops having a flap fastened by two brass studs. A haversack and canteen are slung on the left side. The saddlery is standard apart from the bride, which is unique: it is the standard headroller with a local pattern of bit buckled on by a short strap. The trooper’s blanket, a horse rug and fodder are all carried. The Bushmen’s horses were all taken to the war from Australia, being of higher quality than any brought from England or found in South Africa.
On the right: Major, New South Wales Lancers, 1897-early 1900s
The hat badge is an elephant’s head with crossed lances and a wreath, the collar badge the tusked elephant’s head alone, both being in white metal. The ranking on the red shoulder strap is gilt. Note whistle lanyard just visible at throat; and unique pattern of sword frog, designed for this élite corps of the State of New South Wales. The hat plume is of glossy cock’s feathers.





Next: Australian Soldiers in World War I
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Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 30 яну 2016, 00:01

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1. The Victoria Cross - 2016-01-29 09:20:19
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On the 29 January 1856 Queen Victoria introduced the Victoria Cross, the highest military decoration available to British and Commonwealth forces, to honour acts of valour during the Crimean War.
It is awarded for “…most conspicuous bravery, or some daring or pre-eminent act of valour or self-sacrifice, or extreme devotion to duty in the presence of the enemy.”
To mark the 160th anniversary we have put together this blog, looking at some of the recipients of the Victoria Cross, from the very first recipient in the Crimean War up to Vietnam.

The Crimean War
Lieutenant Charles D. Lucas
This Officer was promoted to his present rank on the 21st of June 1854, for his gallantry in throwing overboard a live shell, at the first attack on the batteries of Bomarsund. Captain Hall writes to Sir C. Napier:—" With regard to Mr. Lucas, I have the pleasure to report a remarkable instance of coolness and presence of mind in action, he having taken up, and thrown overboard, a live shell thrown on board the ' Hecla' by the enemy, while the fuze was burning."
The London Gazette, 24 February 1857


Zulu War
Corporal William Allen and Private Frederick Hitch
It was chiefly due to the courageous conduct of these men that communication with the hospital was kept up at all. Holding together at all costs a most dangerous post, raked in reverse by the enemy's fire from the hill, they were both severely wounded, but their determined conduct enabled the patients to be withdrawn from the hospital, and when incapacitated by their wounds from fighting, they continued, as soon as their wounds had been dressed, to serve out ammunition to their comrades during the night.
The London Gazette, 2 May 1879

The First Boer War
Provisional Lance-Corporal Joseph John Farmer
For conspicuous bravery during the engagement with the Boers at the Majuba Mountain, on the 27th February, 1881, when he showed a spirit of self-abnegation and an example of cool courage which cannot be too highly commended. While the Boers closed with the British troops near the wells, Corporal Farmer held a white flag over the wounded, and when the arm holding the flag was shot through, he called out that he had "another." He then raised the flag with the other arm, and .continued to do so until that also was-pierced with a bullet.
The London Gazette, 17 May 1881

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The Second Boer War
Sergeant Donald Farmer
During the attack on General Clements' Camp at Nooitgedacht, on the 13th December, 1900, Lieutenant Sandilands, Cameron Highlanders, with fifteen men, went to the assistance of a picquet which was heavily engaged, most of the men having been killed or wounded. The enemy!, who were hidden by trees, opened fire on the party at a range of about 20 yards, killing two and wounding five, including Lieutenant Sandilands. Sergeant Farmer at once went to the Officer, who was perfectly helpless, and carried him away under a very heavy and close fire to a place of comparative safety, after which he returned to the firing line and was eventually taken prisoner.
The London Gazette, 12 April 1901

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World War I
Captain Edward Bamford, D.S.O., R.M.L.I.
For most conspicuous gallantry.
This officer landed on the mole from ''Vindictive" with numbers 5, 7 and 8 platoons of the marine storming force, in the face of great difficulties. When on the mole and under heavy fire, he displayed the greatest initiative in the command of his company, and 'by his total disregard of danger showed a magnificent example to his men. He first established a strong point on the right of the disembarkation, and, when satisfied that that was safe, led an assault on a battery to the left with the utmost coolness and valour.
Captain Bamford was selected by the officers of the R.M.A. and R.M.L.I. detachments to receive the Victoria Cross under Rule 13 of the Royal Warrant, dated the 29th January, 1856.
The London Gazette, 19 July 1918

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World War II
Second-Lieutenant Premindra Singh Bhagat, Corps of Indian Engineers (serving with Royal Bombay Sappers and Miners)
For most conspicuous gallantry on active service in the Middle East. During the pursuit of the enemy following the capture of Metemma on the night 31st January - 1st February, 1941, Second-Lieutenant Bhagat was in command of a section of a Field Company, Sappers and Miners, detailed to accompany the leading mobile troops (Bren Carriers) to clear the road and adjacent areas of mines. For a period of four days and over a distance of 55 miles this officer in the leading carrier led the Column. He detected and supervised the clearing of fifteen minefields. Speed being essential he worked at high pressure from dawn to dusk each day. On two occasions when his carrier was blown up with casualties to others and on a third occasion when ambushed and under close enemy fire, he himself carried straight on with his task. He refused relief when worn out with strain and fatigue and with one ear-drum punctured by an explosion, on the grounds that he was now better qualified to continue his task to the end.
His coolness, persistence over a period of 96 hours and gallantry, not only in battle, but throughout the long period when the safety of the Column and the speed at which it could advance were dependent on his personal efforts, were of the highest order.
The London Gazette, 6 June 1941

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Korean War
Private William Speakman, Black Watch (Royal Highland Regiment), attached to the 1st Battalion, The King's Own Scottish Borderers
From 0400 hours, 4th November, 1951, the defensive positions held by 1st Battalion, The King's Own Scottish Borderers, were continuously subjected to heavy and accurate enemy shell and mortar fire. At 1545 hours, this fire became intense and continued thus for the next two hours, considerably damaging the defences and wounding a number of men.
At 1645 hours, the enemy in their hundreds advanced in wave upon wave against the King's Own Scottish Borderers' positions, and by 1745 hours, fierce hand to hand fighting was taking place on every position.
Private Speakman, a member of B Company, Headquarters, learning that the section holding the left shoulder of the Company's position had been seriously depleted by casualties, had had its N.C.Os. wounded and was being overrun, decided on his own initiative to drive the enemy off the position and keep them off it. To effect this he collected quickly a large pile of grenades and a party of six men. Then displaying complete disregard for his own personal safety he led his party in a series of grenade charges against the enemy; and continued doing so as each successive wave of enemy reached the crest of the hill. The force and determination of his charges broke up each successive enemy onslaught and resulted in an ever mounting pile of enemy dead.
Having led some ten charges, through withering enemy machine gun and mortar fire, Private Speakman was eventually severely wounded in the leg. Undaunted by his wounds, he continued to lead charge after charge against the enemy and it was only after a direct order from his superior officer that he agreed to pause for a first field dressing to be applied to his wounds. Having had his wounds bandaged, Private Speakman immediately rejoined his comrades and led them again and again forward in a series of grenade charges, up to the time of the withdrawal of his Company at 2100 hours.
At the critical moment of the withdrawal, amidst an inferno of enemy machine gun and mortar fire, as well as grenades, Private Speakman led a final charge to clear the crest of the hill and hold it, whilst the remainder of his Company withdrew. Encouraging his gallant, but by now sadly depleted party, he assailed the enemy with showers of grenades and kept them at bay sufficiently long for his Company to effect its withdrawal.
Under the stress and strain of this battle, Private Speakman's outstanding powers of leadership were revealed and he so dominated the situation, that he inspired his comrades to stand firm and fight the enemy to a standstill.
His great gallantry and utter contempt for his own personal safety were an inspiration to all his comrades. He was, by his heroic actions, personally responsible for causing enormous losses to the enemy, assisting his Company to maintain their position for some four hours and saving the lives of many of his comrades when they were forced to withdraw from their position.
Private Speakman's heroism under intense fire throughout the operation and when painfully wounded was beyond praise and is deserving of supreme recognition.
The London Gazette, 25 December 1951


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Vietnam War
Warrant Officer Class II Rayene Stewart SIMPSON, D.C.M., 217622, Royal Australian Infantry
On 6th May 1969, Warrant Officer Simpson was serving as Commander of 232nd Mobile Strike Force Company of 5th Special Forces Group on a search and clear operation in Kontum Province, near the Laotian border. When one of his platoons became heavily engaged with the enemy, he led the remainder of his company to its assistance. Disregarding the dangers involved, he placed himself at the front of his troops, thus becoming a focal point of enemy fire, and personally led the assault on the left flank of die enemy position. As the company moved forward, an Australian Warrant Officer commanding one of the platoons was seriously wounded and the assault began to falter. Warrant Officer Simpson, at great personal risk and under heavy enemy fire, moved across open ground, reached the wounded Warrant Officer and carried him to a position of safety. He then returned to his company where, with complete disregard for his safety, he crawled forward to within ten metres of the enemy and threw grenades into their positions. As darkness fell, and being unable to break into the enemy position, Warrant Officer Simpson ordered his company to withdraw. He then threw smoke grenades and, carrying a wounded platoon leader, covered the withdrawal of the company together with five indigenous soldiers. His leadership and personal bravery in this action were outstanding.
On 11th May 1969, in the same operation, Warrant Officer Simpson's Battalion Commander was killed and an Australian Warrant Officer and several indigenous soldiers were wounded. In addition, one other Australian Warrant Officer who had been separated from the majority of his troops was contained in the area by enemy fire. Warrant Officer Simpson quickly organised two platoons of indigenous soldiers and several advisors and led them to the position of the contact. On reaching the position the element with Warrant Officer Simpson came under heavy fire and all but a few of the soldiers with him fell back. Disregarding his own safety, he moved forward in the face of accurate enemy machine gun fire, in order to cover the initial evacuation of the casualties. The wounded were eventually moved out of the line of enemy fire, which all this time was directed at Warrant Officer Simpson from close range. At the risk of almost certain death he made several attempts to move further forward towards his Battalion Commander's body but on each occasion he was stopped by heavy fire. Realising the position was becoming untenable and that priority should be given to extricating other casualties as quickly as possible, Warrant Officer Simpson alone and still under enemy fire covered the withdrawal of the wounded by personally placing himself between the wounded and the enemy. From this position he fought on and by outstanding courage and valour was able to prevent the enemy advance until the wounded were removed from the immediate vicinity. Warrant Officer Simpson's gallant and individual action and his coolness under fire were exceptional and were instrumental in achieving the successful evacuation of the wounded to the helicopter evacuation pad.
Warrant Officer Simpson's repeated acts of personal bravery in this operation were an inspiration to all Vietnamese, United States and Australian soldiers who served with him. His conspicuous gallantry was in the highest tradition of the Australian Army.
The London Gazette, 26 August 1969



If you are interested in reading more about any of these subjects you may wish to take a look at the books listed below:
The Crimean War
The Zulu War
The First Boer War
The Second Boer War
World War I
World War II
Korean War
The Vietnam War


Special thanks to The London Gazette.
canonman
Мнения: 2
Регистриран: 12 май 2012, 16:48

Re: Новини - литература и периодика

Мнение от canonman » 30 яну 2016, 10:04

Здравейте!
Решихме с Оги Стефанов да отбележим пенсионирането на Самолетът-боец - МиГ-21 по подобаващ начин. Направихме този плакат, който е с детайлировка и качество на впечатляващо ниво. Размерът е 57х100 см, а по-долу може да се видят и детайли. Машината е последната приземила се в Графа на 18 декември 2015. Кратката история на типа е на два езика - български и английски. По корпусът личат дори следи от експлоатацията - като истински е :)


Петър Пенев / AirshipGallery
Потребителски аватар
Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България
Мнения: 15345
Регистриран: 02 яну 2012, 19:25

Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 01 фев 2016, 00:01

Blog
Blog

1. Sunday Photo - The Battle for Hill 170 - 2016-01-31 09:24:23
On 31 January 1945 a reinforced Japanese infantry battalion launched a fierce surprise assault on the 3rd Commando Brigade, who had been tasked with holding Hill 170. Fighting continued throughout the day, with heavy MG and artillery fire raining down on the Allied positions and Japanese assault engineers undertaking suicidal missions to take out Allied tanks. Savage hand-to-hand combat raged as the British troops fought tooth and nail to maintain their position.
Victory at the Battle of Hill 170 would be a key factor in the fate of the Japanese 28th Army in Arakan, but it came at a heavy price. The 3rd Commando Brigade lost 45 officers and ORs killed and a further 90 wounded. Japanese dead exceeded 340.
The photograph below shows the 3rd Commando Brigade coming ashore during the Burma Campaign.

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If you’d like to read more about this battle, take a look at Battle Orders 18: British Commandos 1940 – 46 by Tim Moreman.
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Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България
Мнения: 15345
Регистриран: 02 яну 2012, 19:25

Мнение от Клуб Стендов Моделизъм България » 04 фев 2016, 00:00

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1. En préparation sur mon écran : BATAILLES AÉRIENNES n° 76, - 2016-02-03 03:28:00
La non-stop Offensive (juin 1941- 26 octobre 1941)
Tome I : de juin au 17 juillet 1941
Encore des Spitfire ! Mais en compagnie de Messerschmitt....grâce aux bons soins de JL Roba. (23 profils)

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2. En préparation sur mon écran : le 350th Squadron (Belgium) de la RAF. - 2016-02-03 03:02:00
Une bonne histoire belge...
Bientôt un livre édité par LELA PRESSE et écrit par Jean-Louis Roba !
Les Spitfire en sont la vedette, du Mk II au Mk XIV, en passant par le Mk V.

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Заключена

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